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  1. #1 The Constitution Is Just Parchment, Get Over It 
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    This comes from a lefty site: Common Dreams. Now correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't DUmmies accuse George Bush of having said, "The Constitution is just a piece of paper"?

    http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/07/10

    The Constitution Is Just Parchment, Get Over It
    by David Michael Green

    Last week America engaged in one of its perennial paroxysms of constitutional cogitation – this time over the Obama health care bill – with (mostly) predictable results....


    ...Today’s rant is on the destructive dogmas and horrid habits of our national addiction to the practice of constitutionalism itself....

    ...But what’s really wrong, at the foundation of this pyramid of bad practices, is the whole notion of constitutionalism itself. Somehow we’ve gotten it into our heads that we as a twenty-first century contemporary society are only permitted to do what the Constitution of the late eighteenth century permits us to do. I, for one, don’t see the wisdom in that at all, and I say that for a number of good reasons.

    To begin with, it is a fool’s errand to believe that we can ascertain the intentions of the Founders on a huge raft of contemporary issues which – like radar itself, would have been completely off their screens in the pre-industrial, let alone pre-post-industrial, agrarian society in which they lived. Even the Founders themselves – the very people who wrote the document in question – began debating about what the Constitution permits immediately after ratification, notably the 1790 row between Hamilton and Madison over whether a federal bank was permitted.

    That particular debate – between two key authors of the Constitution a mere one year after it was ratified – suggests a second problem with the notion of constitutionalism as the foundational mechanism for policy-making. Namely, that the document is written in vague enough language in many places so as to permit multiple interpretations on given questions, each sometimes equally valid. Not for nothing, for example, is one of the key provisions of the document referred to as the “elastic clause”.

    So already, any rationale for making decisions on everything from health care to pornography to torture to racial equality in this fashion is on the shakiest of grounds on the basis of these two critiques alone. But there are other reasons for rejecting this approach as well....


    But, truth be told, it’s actually not such a very good document, if we’re honest about it. I know you’re not supposed to say that, but then again if we occasionally told the truth in America we wouldn’t be in the mess we’re in right now either. So I will.

    The first thing to notice about the Constitution, looked at dispassionately, is what is not in it. It is, in terms of actual content, very little of a moral statement at all. It does include some guaranteed freedoms as something of an afterthought in the Bill of Rights, but it does not otherwise have any substantive content, especially on any serious ethical or philosophical issues. Moreover, on the great moral question of democratic inclusion, the prescriptions of the Constitution are highly wanting (though some – but not all – of this may be fairly excused by the ethos of the historical moment). There is no room for women here, nor for less-than-wealthy men, nor for non-whites. I don’t know about you, but if you want me to be impressed with any given manifesto or political statement, it needs to stand for something at least a bit novel and profound.

    So what is in the document, then, if not some secular equivalent of the Ten Commandments? It is essentially a blueprint for a governing structure, and little else of note. The Constitution says who decides in American society, how they come to occupy those positions, and how these positions relate to each other in terms of their powers. That’s just about it, really.

    Now, if that happened to represent some brilliant form of governing structure, far superior to all the others, then I might be persuaded that our national reverence for this centuries old document was well founded. In point of fact, however, I would argue rather the opposite is true here. Though I think the Constitution represents a fairly clever bit of engineering on the part of the Founders, given the goals and parameters of their moment, those aren’t goals I particularly share, nor can they be fairly argued to be very much helpful to national governance in our time.

    For the key thrust of the regime created by the Founders in the Constitution is the dilution of power. Their task was to come up with a government of stronger power than the failing Articles of Confederation, but they were adamant that it not be too strong, so they found three ways to spread power out. First, vertically, by sharing power between the states and the federal government. Second, horizontally, within the federal government, by means of separation of powers across independent branches of policy-making and implementing institutions, otherwise known as the idea of ‘checks and balances’. And, third, by expressly limiting the powers that the federal government possessed over the public and over the states, as itemized in the Bill of Rights...

    ...This is a governing structure that is designed to mostly be incapable of doing anything, other than when very, very broad consensus exists across all the governing institutions. The diffusion of power also means that assigning responsibility is rather difficult as well. If you’re unhappy with your government today, who do you blame? Democrats? Republicans? The President? Congress? The Courts? And if you have a hard time affixing blame, how can you choose a different alternative as a remedy?

    I would argue that this is a form of government – one in which so many veto points guarantee relative inaction – only well suited to a people who are paranoid about the supposed perils of governmental powers. It’s true that probably no other culture on the planet fits that description as well as American society, but that said, it seems to me that there comes a point at which the dysfunctionality of weak government outweighs any benefits. Besides which, the small government limitations in place today seem only to apply to making it difficult for our government to provide benefits for its citizens, like health care. When it comes to the really ugly stuff (and the stuff that the Founders were concerned about) – like unrestrained warfare, warrantless spying on citizens, endless incarceration without due process, and now even assassination of citizens on the president’s unilateral whim – there’s no small government to be found anywhere in sight, anyhow. And, by the way, do the other democracies of the world – those not possessing the power-diffusing principles of governance America has – suffer from totalitarian regimes controlling their subjects’ lives in some sort of nightmare right out of Orwell? Is that what you see in Sweden? Canada? New Zealand?

    Which reminds us that there is a better way, actually. In a parliamentary, unitary (non-federalist) democracy, power resides in parliament. Period. Which also means that responsibility resides there as well. There are no checks and balances, no competing institutions, no great secular scripture on high to consult, and no gridlock. If you don’t like the way things are going in your country, you know who to blame, and what to do about it at the next election.

    And this reminds us further, then, that American ultra-reverence for the US Constitution is even more misplaced. The main thing – indeed, just about the only thing – that the document does is to spell out the governing structure for the society. I’d say that’s undeserving of reverence enough but if, in doing so, it prescribes a fairly dysfunctional one, why must we always genuflect in its direction every time we need to make a decision more than two centuries later? If it doesn’t even do the one thing it was designed to do so very well, why in the world should it be controlling our lives?

    There are two great ironies here. One is that I suspect that we take the Founders a whole helluva lot more seriously than they took themselves. They referred to their regime-creating enterprise as an “experiment”, and they meant that rather literally. Not only did they not think their Constitution walked on water, they didn’t really have much of a clue as to whether it could work. And there were good reasons to adopt such a healthy skepticism. First because they had gotten it wrong very recently, and not once, but twice. They had tried monarchy and abandoned it as a failure. They then substituted the Articles of Confederation, a governing design so flawed it barely lasted a decade. Moreover, if you look at what actually transpired at the constitutional convention, you see all sorts of ideas and debates and compromises flying around amongst the delegates. The point is, it’s not like these people were hand-delivered an instruction manual for good governance by the Supreme Being. They knew that they weren’t, so how come we don’t?

    The other great irony here is that our twenty-first century slavish reverence for the diktats of the Constitution (or what some of us claim to be able to decipher as its diktats) does a massive disservice to the one great thing that the Founders actually did contribute in penning the document.

    In truth, it’s not the contents of the Constitution that are to be greatly admired, for all the reasons noted above. This was a significantly flawed document in 1787, and is even more so today. What really matters is not what they did so much as that they did it. The really amazing thing about the Founders and the Enlightenment movement of which they were leading lights, was the transition they provided to the concept of self-rule, and to the notion of governance based on the principle of reason, or rational analysis based on empirical observation. This idea was almost wholly foreign to their time, and their broader ethos that humans could be trusted to think for themselves and govern themselves was truly a gigantic leap out of the dark ages and into modernity. Indeed, Enlightenment ideas arguably represent the most significant development in all of human history.

    For this, I truly admire the confidence, courage and ingenuity of Founders’ generation, and I’m truly grateful for their contribution.

    In light of this, then, how much more absurd and sad is it that we – centuries further down the road – dishonor their contribution by continually trying to make policy on the basis of interpreting some über-text written by some quasi-deities from a wholly different culture and time, instead of following their prime directive and thinking for ourselves?

    I’m pretty confident that the Founders would agree that in slavishly seeking to decipher their ancient words and letting those govern us today, we have in fact missed the very core essence of what they were trying to say.

    Justice Antonin Scalia, one of the most destructive forces in American history, not long ago had a message for liberals and other patriots still smarting from the judicial coup he engineered which put another of the most destructive forces in our history into the White House for eight years: “Get over it” said the nice judge.

    I’d like to return the favor with respect to his brand of regressivism masked as constitutional originalism: It’s just parchment, people. Get over it.
    Last edited by Elspeth; 07-10-2012 at 01:18 PM.
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    David Michael "My Mom Says I''m A Genius!" Green may be comfortable with the thought of living under a government with highly-fungible limits, but I doubt if he'd like the actuality of it. Wide-open rules tend to attract people who thrive on exploiting wide-open rules, and not 'For the general welfare,' so I expect he'd live to regret wishing for that but possibly not much past that point.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbAss Tanker View Post
    David Michael "My Mom Says I''m A Genius!" Green may be comfortable with the thought of living under a government with highly-fungible limits, but I doubt if he'd like the actuality of it. Wide-open rules tend to attract people who thrive on exploiting wide-open rules, and not 'For the general welfare,' so I expect he'd live to regret wishing for that but possibly not much past that point.
    The problem with people like this Green character is they always think their smarter than everyone else and won't be one of the ones caught up in their own creation.

    It's the same reason why I think that the left holds on so tightly to the notion of a Communist Utopia in America despite all the other nations that have failed when they tried...the American left thinks they can succeed where other;s have failed because they are smarter than the others who tried and failed.
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

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    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by txradioguy View Post
    they always think their smarter than everyone else
    Irony alert -
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Bailey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Irony alert -
    Maximum irony alert...
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    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by txradioguy View Post
    The problem with people like this Green character is they always think their smarter than everyone else and won't be one of the ones caught up in their own creation.

    It's the same reason why I think that the left holds on so tightly to the notion of a Communist Utopia in America despite all the other nations that have failed when they tried...the American left thinks they can succeed where other;s have failed because they are smarter than the others who tried and failed.
    The left assumes that they are smarter than their neighbors, and therefore have a right to rule us. We see this expressed repeatedly in the rhetoric of leftist intellectuals such as Rousseau, Marx, Chomsky and the rest of the proglodyte intelligentsia. What they fail to understand is that ultimately, any system must be run by human beings, and all of us are flawed in some way. Those who do not recognize their flaws are the most dangerous to have in charge, as they accept no criticism and do not learn from their mistakes.

    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Irony alert -
    Tex doesn't presume to dictate how they're supposed to live their lives, as they presume to do to us. It is the left's conceit of their own mental superiority that he attacked.
    --Odysseus
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