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  1. #1 Why Democrats, including me, are abandoning Obama 
    Senior Member Gina's Avatar
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    I wrote an article last month for this website discussing how I – along with other Democrats and independents – might just cast our vote for Romney, although I didn't fully explain the rationale for the change. While I'm not claiming there is a new wave of supporters for Mitt Romney, there is no denying that there is a large number of disgruntled Democrats and independents who are dissatisfied with President Obama. And that may just be enough to elect Mitt Romney.

    At this week's Democratic Convention, president Obama spoke of his many hopes and dreams for America. He has often said that he expects to leave a legacy of great achievements, like those of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.

    Kennedy was able to galvanize the nation not simply because he wanted to do so, but as a result of methodical campaigning and stumping that culminated with a cross-country trip in 1956, where he introduced himself to voters, delegates and politicians. Lyndon Johnson was able to pass numerous bills into law, not merely for the reason that they were morally right, but because he was a skilled politician who understood and accepted the workings of our political system.

    JFK was a relentless and industrious campaigner. He came from a level of wealth and privilege that placed him at the top of the one percent of his day, yet instead of rejecting the mandatory campaign requirements of politicians of that era, he embraced the daily rigors of handshaking, personal visits and ward style politics, exploiting them further than anyone ever had before.

    The president has a wonderful vision for America, but it's nothing more than a delusion that can't be achieved during a time of record – and climbing – deficits.
    -
    Lyndon Johnson was the consummate politician who truly understood that the art of the deal was all about bipartisanship and he worked tirelessly to unite our country. It’s been said that while most men were content to read a book or watch a sporting event for recreation, Lyndon Johnson would follow the results of a local Texas school board election for fun. His love for politics was unflagging. That was his tennis.

    President Obama is said to abhor the daily machinations of Washington politics. He refuses to miss more than two dinners a week with his daughters. He prefers not to meet with senators, congressmen or significant donors, yet he still expects to reap the benefits normally provided by those circumstances.

    Obama snubbed the advice of George Soros (perhaps his wealthiest and most influential donor) and has alienated many other important supporters. What President Obama may perceive as altruistic is nothing more than intractable behavior along with a refusal to accept the reality of American politics and – ultimately – the basic job description of president of the United States.

    Perhaps President Obama should consider that his dislike of Washington politics has contributed to the inertia and current stalemate that exists in Washington. He promised hope and change, but his current campaign is divisive with negative advertisements and driven by class warfare.

    In Thursday night's convention address, President Obama reprised the same promises he made in 2008, again with no feasible suggestions of how to pay for them.

    The president has a wonderful vision for America, but it's nothing more than a delusion that can't be achieved during a time of record – and climbing – deficits. Our government has built roads, bridges and schools that have educated us. However, it has also become a bloated money burning machine in desperate need of reform – a word that does not seem to exist in Obama's vocabulary.

    Democrats are jumping ship because President Obama is offering nothing but blame for the previous administration and his own pipe dreams at a time when voters need some real assurance if they’re going to believe the economy can be saved. Unfortunately, speaking as one of those Democrats, I have little hope that President Obama will change.
    Makes sense to me.
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  2. #2 Maureen Dowd 
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    "the little o says it's all our fault"

    HOW did the one formerly known as The One go for two?

    In his renomination acceptance speech here on Thursday night, he told us that America’s problems were tougher to solve than he had originally thought.

    And that’s why he has kindly agreed to give us more time.

    Because, after all, it’s our fault.

    “So you see, the election four years ago wasn’t about me,” President Obama explained. “It was about you. My fellow citizens, you were the change.”

    We were the change!

    We were the change? Us?

    How on earth could we have let so much of what we fought for slip away? How did we allow Mitch McConnell, Karl Rove, the super PACs, the Tea Party, the lobbyists and the special interests take away our voice?

    “Only you can make sure that doesn’t happen,” the president chastised us. “Only you have the power to move us forward.”

    We’re so lame. We were naïve, brimming with confidence that we could slow the rise of the oceans, heal the planet, fix the cracks in the Capitol dome.

    We never should have let the Congressional Democrats run wild with their stimulus spending on pork that didn’t even create the right kinds of jobs.

    It also took us too long to realize what the party of know-nothings and no-everything was up to. We should never have walked into that blind budget alley with John Boehner. We should have realized, after the first of three phone calls went unreturned, that even with a few more merlots under his belt, the speaker wouldn’t have the guts to tell us he couldn’t get a grand bargain through his Tea Party House.

    We should never have delegated health care to Max Baucus and let him waste time trying to cut a deal with Senate Republicans who had no intention of going along even with ideas — like the individual mandate — that they backed first.

    We should have listened to Joe Biden instead of getting rolled by the generals on Afghanistan.

    We’re older, wiser and grayer now.

    It’s depressing to look back and remember what soaring hopes we had for ourselves only four years ago. Did we overdo it with the Greek columns? Sheesh, a million people showed up for our inauguration. Now we brag when we break 10,000.

    What a drag to realize that Hillary was right: big rallies and pretty words don’t always get you where you want to go. Who knew that Eric Cantor wouldn’t instantly swoon at the sound of our voice or the sight of our smile?

    Our forbearing leader didn’t pander to us with that standard breakup line: “It’s not you, it’s me.”

    He gave it to us straight: It’s not me, it’s you.

    If we get a second term, maybe Republicans will stop blocking, and blowing racial dog whistles. Maybe they’ll realize that they should deal with us, especially if they lose enough Latino voters to cost them not just the White House but Congressional seats.

    As the president told us, “our destinies are bound together.” So we have to stop holding him back when he’s trying to go “Forward.”

    We admit we like our solitude — maybe a little too much given our chosen profession. We could have opened up our weekend golf foursomes to a few pols — even women! — rather than just the usual junior aides.

    And we could probably stomach giving lifts in the limo to some mayors and members of Congress, and actually pretend that we care about their advice — not to mention their votes.

    Maybe we could drop the disdainful body language. For that matter, shouldn’t we put a little more effort into helping elect Democrats to Congress? Just because we only did a cameo in the Senate doesn’t mean some people there don’t think of it as a star turn.

    Apparently, etiquette matters. We could send out a few thank-you notes to big donors and celebrities who give benefit concerts. Oddly, it turns out folks like to frame notes signed by the president and hang them on the wall.

    Maybe we relied too much on Valerie Jarrett, a k a the Night Stalker and Keeper of the Essence. She says people should woo us. But could it be that we need to woo them as well?

    How could we have let the storybook president lose his narrative?

    How could we keep failing to explain what changes we have gotten through? Why is salesmanship so beneath us?

    It’s ironic that Bill Clinton, who couldn’t pass his own health care bill, does a better job of selling ours. Even Obama said on Friday that we should make Bill a cabinet member — “the secretary of ’splainin’ stuff.”

    We are grateful to the president for deigning to point out our flaws and giving us another chance.

    “I’m the president,” he intoned.

    But We, the People, must do the work.

    The buck stops with us.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    Live every day as if it were your last, because one of these days, it will be.
     

  3. #3 KIMBERLEY A. STRASSEL 
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    The Party that Obama Un-Built

    Julian Castro is no Barack Obama. And for that, Democrats have themselves to blame.

    The focus of this week's Democratic convention was President Obama. Lost in the adulation was the diminished state to which he has brought his broader party. Today's Democrats are a shadow of 2008—struggling for re-election, isolated to a handful of states, lacking reform ideas, bereft of a future political bench. It has been a stunning slide.

    The speech by Mr. Castro, the young and charismatic mayor of San Antonio, was the Democrats' attempt to recapture the party optimism that then-Senate candidate Obama sparked at the 2004 convention. John Kerry didn't win, but that year marked the start of an ambitious Democratic plan to revitalize the party.
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    Democratic pollster Stan Greenberg on President Obama's recent decline in the polls and whether he'll get a bump from the convention. Credit: Associated Press




    In 2006, Nancy Pelosi muzzled her liberal inclinations to recruit and elect her "Majority Makers"—a crop of moderate and conservative Democrats who won Republican districts and delivered control of the House for the first time in 14 years.

    Democrats in 2006 also claimed the Senate, with savvy victories in states like Montana and Virginia. The party thumped Republicans in gubernatorial races, winning in the South (Arkansas), the Mountain West (Colorado), and in Ohio (for the first time since 1991). A vibrant candidate Obama further boosted Democratic ranks in 2008.

    By 2009, President Obama presided over what could fairly be called a big-tent coalition. The Blue Dog caucus had swelled to 51 members, representing plenty of conservative America. Democrats held the majority of governorships. Mr. Obama had won historic victories in Virginia and North Carolina. The prediction of liberal demographers John Judis and Ruy Teixeira's 2004 book, "The Emerging Democratic Majority"—lasting progressive dominance via a coalition of minorities, women, suburbanites and professionals—attracted greater attention among political analysts.

    It took Mr. Obama two years to destroy this potential, with an agenda that forced his party to field vote after debilitating vote—stimulus, ObamaCare, spending, climate change. The public backlash, combined with the president's mismanagement of the economy, has reversed Democrats' electoral gains and left a party smaller than at any time since the mid-1990s.

    Of the 21 Blue Dogs elected since 2006, five remain in office. The caucus is on the verge of extinction, as members have retired, been defeated in primaries waged by liberal activists, or face impossible re-elections. The GOP is set to take Senate seats in North Dakota and Nebraska, and maybe to overturn Democratic toeholds in states from Montana to Virginia. There is today a GOP senator in Massachusetts. Republicans claim 29 governorships and may gain two to four more this year.

    As for the presidential race, Republicans are in sight of taking back Virginia and North Carolina and are competitive in supposedly new Democratic strongholds like Colorado and New Mexico. The GOP is also making unexpected inroads in Wisconsin and Iowa. The real story of the Obama presidency is the degree to which he has pushed his party back toward its coastal and urban strongholds.

    All this was vividly on display in Charlotte this week. While the party's most vulnerable members aren't in outright mutiny against Mr. Obama, more than two dozen didn't risk attending the convention. In contrast to last week's GOP celebration of reformist GOP governors, the Charlotte podium was largely dominated by activists (Sandra Fluke, Lilly Ledbetter), the liberal congressional faithful (Mrs. Pelosi, Harry Reid), and urban mayors from failing states (Los Angeles's Antonio Villaraigosa, Chicago's Rahm Emanuel).

    Enlarge Image


    Reuters/Jessica Rinaldi

    San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro at the Democratic convention, Sept. 4.


    While the GOP has feted its upcoming stars—including minority governors like New Mexico's Susana Martinez and Louisiana's Bobby Jindal—the president has done little to nurture his down-ballot partners. Where is the next generation of Democrats?

    Which brings us to Mr. Castro. Mr. Obama lit up the political scene in 2004 with a lofty convention speech that told a heartfelt story, appealed to the best of America, and never once mentioned George W. Bush.

    Mr. Castro, by contrast, was tasked by the Obama team with laying out the bitter Democratic themes of this election. His own eloquent story was weighed down by his job of ridiculing Mitt Romney, lauding government, and stoking class warfare. The comparisons of Mr. Castro in 2012 with Mr. Obama in 2004 are misplaced; Mr. Obama has made them impossible.

    Mr. Castro must be wondering what chance he has of higher office in Texas, which today has not one statewide elected Democrat. It's a question for Democrats across wide sections of the country.

    The liberals who supported Mr. Obama's expansion of the entitlement state are pinning everything on Mr. Obama's re-election, assuming it will cement their big-government gains and allow them to grind back congressional majorities in the future.

    But contemplate the situation if he loses. Consider a Democratic Party that may hold neither the White House nor Congress, that has disappeared in parts of the country, and that has few future Obama-like stars. Compare that to 2008. This is the party Barack Obama un-built.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    Live every day as if it were your last, because one of these days, it will be.
     

  4. #4  
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    The whole Gaddamn thing is just down right depressing.

    It's about We, The People. Not Him.

    At Notre Dame, when He was protested by right-to-lifers, He said, "Let's compromise". They did. He didn't. They'll vote for Him anyway, cause he's willing to compromise.

    Damn.
     

  5. #5  
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    What I find interesting is the discussion of the shrinking of the Dem party and their downward spiral. They've been saying that about the Republicans, too. Look at Rush saying if Obama wins, the Republican party might cease to exist, because if they can't defeat Obama with this terrible economy, they can't defeat anyone.

    Could it be that with the passage of time, both parties have become obsolete? Nothing is getting done. Perhaps it's time for both to go the way of the Whigs and the Tories, and for new parties to form. Just a thought.
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member Gina's Avatar
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    Good men sleep peaceably in their beds at night because
    rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.



    Real superheroes don't wear capes. They wear dog tags.
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member Janice's Avatar
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    Look forward > Lean forward > Bend over.
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    Liberalism is just communism sold by the drink.
     

  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gina View Post
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    Makes sense to me.
    There is a certain amount of babble to that article- but I came away from it confused which is a good thing. As a conservative Democrat, I have felt that I am in the position of holding my nose while voting for Obama, especially since the backdoor amnesty stunt he recently pulled.

    I think we ought to ask ourselves which candidate has the most to prove at this point and how he would go about proving it. You can't convert people to another race- but you can show the world that a Mormon is the savior of the US, a profound patriot and nationalist (except for that Polynesians and Indians are Lamanites crap), and not some whackjob sent to Washington by America's most notorious and enduring cult. Hell, he might even deport the illegal aliens, build a universal single payer healthcare system, and tattoo the Second Amendment on Californians and Illinoiwhatevers at birth.
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member wasp69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    There is a certain amount of babble to that article- but I came away from it confused which is a good thing. As a conservative Democrat, I have felt that I am in the position of holding my nose while voting for Obama, especially since the backdoor amnesty stunt he recently pulled.
    If, after 4 years of misery and bullshit, you still find yourself voting for more while knowing better, there is nothing conservative about you. You're a lib and it's business as usual - party before country.

    I think we ought to ask ourselves which candidate has the most to prove at this point and how he would go about proving it.
    Okay, after 4 years, exactly what has obama done to "prove" he needs another 4?
     

  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wasp69 View Post


    Okay, after 4 years, exactly what has obama done to "prove" he needs another 4?
    That was my point- Obama and his fans had proved what they wanted to prove on election night 2008, ie that a black man could be president of the US.
     

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