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  1. #11  
    Moderator txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    We should expect Obama to support amnesty and open borders. If the darling of the GOP also supports amnesty and open borders, then what choice is there really?
    Long way until 2016...a lot can happen.

    And when Libtards like you are referring to a Republican as our "darling"...that should tell us right there to avoid nominating him.
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    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member southernlady's Avatar
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    Part of why his meds aren't helping is he had a Duodenal Switch and extended release medications do not work in a compromised gut. Here is a very biased article on the weight loss surgery. I say biased because I had the same surgery. And while you can be nutrient deficient, you can handle it with vitamins and minerals and whey isolate protein. But many patients decide that supplementing is too expensive (yeah, like major illnesses like diabetes and high cholesterol don't have a cost).

    I suspect his doctor who is handling his mental issues doesn't know SQUAT about a Duodenal Switch.

    Liz
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  3. #13  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by southernlady View Post
    Part of why his meds aren't helping is he had a Duodenal Switch and extended release medications do not work in a compromised gut. Here is a very biased article on the weight loss surgery. I say biased because I had the same surgery. And while you can be nutrient deficient, you can handle it with vitamins and minerals and whey isolate protein. But many patients decide that supplementing is too expensive (yeah, like major illnesses like diabetes and high cholesterol don't have a cost).

    I suspect his doctor who is handling his mental issues doesn't know SQUAT about a Duodenal Switch.

    Liz


    That's a good point. I'm willing to buy the whole Bipolar thing to a point-I personally think he's kind of old to be getting diagnosed with it for the first time, conditions like that usually show up in late adolescence and early adulthood.
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  4. #14  
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    (snip)

    “My health issues and treatment regimen have become incompatible with service in the House of Representatives,” Jackson wrote. “Therefore, it is with great regret that I resign as a member of the United States House of Representatives, effective today, in order to focus on restoring my health.”

    (snip)

    He couldn’t stop crying, so he couldn’t give a press conference,” according to a source close to Jackson. “First, he is not well. He is up and down. When he’s up, he can talk but he breaks down that’s why he couldn’t conduct the press conference.”
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/OTUS/...ry?id=16758571

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_1...is-bipolar-ii/
    (snip)

    Having blood relatives with bipolar disorder, being in your early 20's, experiencing periods of high stress, abusing drugs or alcohol and going through a major life change like the death of a loved one may raise risk for developing bipolar disorder, according to the Mayo Clinic's bipolar disorder website.

    According to the Clinic, people with bipolar II may have some changes in their functioning but typically can carry on with their normal daily routine. The clinic also said people with bipolar II have periods of depression that typically last longer than periods of hypomania.

    (snip)

    The clinic's statement also noted that Jackson had previously underwent gastric bypass surgery in 2004, which it said can change how the body absorbs food, liquids, vitamins, nutrients and medications.

    The statement was later revised Monday afternoon to say the congressman specifically underwent a duodenal switch, which could lead to those changes in absorption.

    In that procedure, a larger portion of the stomach is left intact as would be left from a gastric bypass, including the pyloric valve that regulates draining of contents from the stomach into the small intestine.

    (snip)
    Continues to sound like an alcohol/drug problem to me. Why the DS when he didn't seem to have a weight problem.

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  5. #15  
    Senior Member southernlady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marv View Post
    Continues to sound like an alcohol/drug problem to me. Why the DS when he didn't seem to have a weight problem.
    Some think *I* didn't seem to have a weight problem either but was considered heavy enough by my insurance to have surgery. I was only 53 lbs over normal BMI but had other issues that allowed me to go ahead. But I got the "you aren't fat enough for surgery" and "why can't you just LOSE weight on your own" often.

    The "aren't fat enough" comment got this: My doctor and I feel that this is the best way to handle my issues. And then a dead level stare to dare them to continue.
    The "why can't you just LOSE weight on your own" comment got this: I've been obese since I was 12. Only 5% of morbidly obese are able to lose weight AND KEEP it off. If a person needed heart surgery would you tell them to heal on their own? Even if healing on their own had a 95% FAILURE rate? No, that person would be encouraged to have surgery.

    I don't know what other problems he had but I DO know the reputation of his surgeon and his surgeon would not do it just because of money. It's a lifetime commitment to MAJOR vitamins, lab work, etc. I'm guessing (NO BASIS in fact here) that he got the correct information but failed to follow the advice.
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  6. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    That's a good point. I'm willing to buy the whole Bipolar thing to a point-I personally think he's kind of old to be getting diagnosed with it for the first time, conditions like that usually show up in late adolescence and early adulthood.
    I have had chemical imbalances which caused personality changes. My imbalances were electrolytes, as I had difficulty maintaining a health potassium level and that screws with every aspect of your being. While I acquired some serious coping skills (writing letters in my head as a tool of discipline and order, rather like making lists, counting ritually, and some TM techniques) there were times when I reacted or acted inappropriately and was aware of it, like I was watching myself lose it.

    My opinion about bi-polar disorder has been shaped by the people I have known who were in treatment for it. I knew one man who used it as an excuse for all of his bad behavior, and I once heard him actually say, "I'm bi-polar, I can do anything I want." At that point, I realized that there was a voluntary element to it, and I don't have a lot of patience with folks who don't manage well. I have even less patience with people who have been told that they are bi-polar by friends, who have not at least gone to a doctor to see what he thinks. Instead, we're all supposed to accommodate said person's "quirks".
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I have had chemical imbalances which caused personality changes. My imbalances were electrolytes, as I had difficulty maintaining a health potassium level and that screws with every aspect of your being. While I acquired some serious coping skills (writing letters in my head as a tool of discipline and order, rather like making lists, counting ritually, and some TM techniques) there were times when I reacted or acted inappropriately and was aware of it, like I was watching myself lose it.

    My opinion about bi-polar disorder has been shaped by the people I have known who were in treatment for it. I knew one man who used it as an excuse for all of his bad behavior, and I once heard him actually say, "I'm bi-polar, I can do anything I want." At that point, I realized that there was a voluntary element to it, and I don't have a lot of patience with folks who don't manage well. I have even less patience with people who have been told that they are bi-polar by friends, who have not at least gone to a doctor to see what he thinks. Instead, we're all supposed to accommodate said person's "quirks".


    Your situation is not bipolar disorder, which is a chemical imbalance also, but of a very specific chemical: Lithium. Although treating BPD with Lithium alone only works for so long, a good way to know if someone is truly bipolar is if Lithium works fairly well the first time it's prescribed.

    But you're right about individual will having a role. Some people can resist the impulses that may be caused by a chemical imbalance better than others.


    I read a really interesting book about psychology, called The Psychopath Test. The author gets into a lot of interesting detail about American practices vs European practices. But he discusses bipolar disorder-I found it fascinating that in Europe, there is no such diagnosis of childhood bipolar disorder. Only American psychologists/psychiatrists are willing to diagnose a child with bipolar disorder, then drug him or her with Depakote or some other really strong medication for something that isn't even recognized as a disorder outside of this country. And, if that kid is in our system, God help him.
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  8. #18  
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
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    I'm of the opinion that bi-polar is another psychological/psychiatric diagnosed condition, which has been used to excuse any number of social problems.

    Obesity? In my life, from grade school in the forties through to retirement in the nineties, I've know five individuals who would be called morbidly obese. Three have passed away, and I don't know about the other two. But I suspect that diabetes had something to do with their conditions.

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  9. #19  
    Senior Member southernlady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marv View Post
    I'm of the opinion that bi-polar is another psychological/psychiatric diagnosed condition, which has been used to excuse any number of social problems.

    Obesity? In my life, from grade school in the forties through to retirement in the nineties, I've know five individuals who would be called morbidly obese. Three have passed away, and I don't know about the other two. But I suspect that diabetes had something to do with their conditions.
    I suspect you are friends with far more than you realize. Considering that over a third of the adult population in the USA is considered obese.

    Obesity is weighing more than 30 BMI based on your height. The CDC definition:
    Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. Obesity is defined as a BMI of greater than or equal to 30 kilos per meter squared and morbid obesity is defined as a BMI greater than or equal to 40 kilos per meter squared. Among Americans 20 years and older, 28% are obese and 5% are morbidly obese.
    More than one-third of U.S. adults (35.7%) and approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.
    I am 5'4" and now weigh 131 lbs, BMI is 22.5 which is normal BMI. Two years ago (before I had surgery) my BMI was 35.2 (anything above 30% is obese). But I did not look fat to most people, just a bit heavy for my height.

    If someone has a 50BMI or more, they are actually considered Super Morbidly Obese not just obese.

    As a result of my surgery, besides getting down to a normal BMI, I managed to lose my insulin pump dependent diabetes (no longer use ANY medications) and my genetically high cholesterol is now totally normal, NO medications required. And I eat very protein & fat based meals. In fact I have to eat LOTS of fat. In fact, I went from 11 prescription medications to 2 and those are not related to obesity at all.
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  10. #20  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marv View Post
    I'm of the opinion that bi-polar is another psychological/psychiatric diagnosed condition, which has been used to excuse any number of social problems.

    Obesity? In my life, from grade school in the forties through to retirement in the nineties, I've know five individuals who would be called morbidly obese. Three have passed away, and I don't know about the other two. But I suspect that diabetes had something to do with their conditions.
    One of the kids I've worked with, one of the most successful kids, was diagnosed at around 12 with bipolar disorder. She had the classic cycles-being up for days without sleep, total meltdowns, the whole works. She doesn't have any symptoms now, and she's an adult attending college. She said that she was a foster kid, with no real family and walking on eggshells constantly around the family members she had left in her life. Her bio mother has a definite diagnosis, although not for bipolar disorder, and the young lady says that some of her behaviors developed to protect her from the crazy woman's bizarre lifestyle.

    She believes that psychologists and social workers (like me) want to diagnose every kid in the system with a psychological disorder so that we can medicate them and keep them in line. She's wrong about me, but not about the system I work within.
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