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  1. #1 Missouri Farmers Fight Rise In Hay Thefts 
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
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    December 3, 2012 9:49 AM


    ST. LOUIS (KMOX) - As if itís not bad enough that Missouri farmers are trying to survive the worst drought in decades, now many of them are facing a new problem thatís costing them big bucks.

    Missouri Farm Bureau president Blake Hurst says thieves are actually targeting those big bundles of hay that are left out in fields prior to being harvested, hauling them off and selling the valuable commodity.

    ďOf course, no one brands their hay so if you hook onto it with your tractor or your pickup and make it out the gate, then itís impossible to prove where the hay came from,Ē Hurst said.

    Hay thieves!!!
    May the FORCE be with you!
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  2. #2  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarasotaRepub View Post
    First the Depression, then the Dust Bowl. Wikipedia talks about how Roosevelt tried to conserve soil and restore the ecological balance, but avoids mentioning that these actions preceded the worst effects of the Dust Bowl. How much you want to bet that environmentalist policies exacerbated the problem?

    During President Franklin D. Roosevelt's first 100 days in office in 1933, governmental programs designed to conserve soil and restore the ecological balance of the nation were implemented. Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes established the Soil Erosion Service in August 1933 under Hugh Hammond Bennett. In 1935, it was transferred and reorganized under the Department of Agriculture and renamed the Soil Conservation Service. More recently, it has been renamed the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).[23]

    Additionally, the Federal Surplus Relief Corporation (FSRC) was created after more than six million pigs were slaughtered to stabilize prices. The pigs were sent to slaughterhouses and the meat packed and distributed to the poor and hungry. FDR in an Address on the AAA commented, "Let me make one other point clear for the benefit of the millions in cities who have to buy meats. Last year the Nation suffered a drought of unparalleled intensity. If there had been no Government program, if the old order had obtained in 1933 and 1934, that drought on the cattle ranges of America and in the corn belt would have resulted in the marketing of thin cattle, immature hogs and the death of these animals on the range and on the farm, and if the old order had been in effect those years, we would have had a vastly greater shortage than we face today. Our program -- we can prove it -- saved the lives of millions of head of livestock. They are still on the range, and other millions of heads are today canned and ready for this country to eat."

    The FSRC diverted agricultural commodities to relief organizations. Apples, beans, canned beef, flour and pork products were distributed through local relief channels. Cotton goods were later included, to clothe the needy.[24]

    In 1935, the federal government formed a Drought Relief Service (DRS) to coordinate relief activities. The DRS bought cattle in counties which were designated emergency areas, for $14 to $20 a head. Animals unfit for human consumption Ė more than 50 percent at the beginning of the program Ė were killed. The remaining cattle were given to the Federal Surplus Relief Corporation (FSRC) to be used in food distribution to families nationwide. Although it was difficult for farmers to give up their herds, the cattle slaughter program helped many of them avoid bankruptcy. "The government cattle buying program was a blessing to many farmers, as they could not afford to keep their cattle, and the government paid a better price than they could obtain in local markets."[25]
    --Odysseus
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    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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  3. #3  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Hay that sucks! I couldn't find any good hay to buy this year, I get alfalfa pellets for 22.00 per #100 that come from Colorado.
    How is obama working out for you?
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Unreconstructed Reb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Hay that sucks! I couldn't find any good hay to buy this year, I get alfalfa pellets for 22.00 per #100 that come from Colorado.
    We've had a good hay season in the Upstate this year. I'm getting round bales of coastal bermuda for $40 each.
    "The beauty of the Second Amendment is that you won't need it until they try to take it away."---Thomas Jefferson

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  5. #5  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unreconstructed Reb View Post
    We've had a good hay season in the Upstate this year. I'm getting round bales of coastal bermuda for $40 each.
    Bermuda here is 80 to 100 per bale but most of it was cut during the drought and has no protein whatsoever, only fiber.
    How is obama working out for you?
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member Unreconstructed Reb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Bermuda here is 80 to 100 per bale but most of it was cut during the drought and has no protein whatsoever, only fiber.
    A few years ago we were dealing with an extreme drought situation and I was paying similar amounts for round bales that we trucked up from Florida.
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  7. #7  
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    In Minnesota, hay has been produced in great numbers. Although we aren't able to sell it to other states since we need most of it to feed the liberals in this state.
    Liberals are proof that evolution is only a theory. Nothing that stupid could evolve past a monkey.
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  8. #8  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unreconstructed Reb View Post
    A few years ago we were dealing with an extreme drought situation and I was paying similar amounts for round bales that we trucked up from Florida.
    That is what they were charging at the field and it was bad hay.
    How is obama working out for you?
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