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  1. #1 A Generation of Deluded Narcissists.... 
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    This article is an important read for anyone who is concerned about the direction pop culture has taken....


    A new analysis of the American Freshman Survey, which has accumulated data for the past 47 years from 9 million young adults, reveals that college students are more likely than ever to call themselves gifted and driven to succeed, even though their test scores and time spent studying are decreasing.

    Psychologist Jean Twenge, the lead author of the analysis, is also the author of a study showing that the tendency toward narcissism in students is up 30 percent in the last thirty-odd years.
    This data is not unexpected. I have been writing a great deal over the past few years about the toxic psychological impact of media and technology on children, adolescents and young adults, particularly as it regards turning them into faux celebrities—the equivalent of lead actors in their own fictionalized life stories.

    On Facebook, young people can fool themselves into thinking they have hundreds or thousands of “friends.” They can delete unflattering comments. They can block anyone who disagrees with them or pokes holes in their inflated self-esteem. They can choose to show the world only flattering, sexy or funny photographs of themselves (dozens of albums full, by the way), “speak” in pithy short posts and publicly connect to movie stars and professional athletes and musicians they “like.”

    We must beware of the toxic psychological impact of media and technology on children, adolescents and young adults, particularly as it regards turning them into faux celebrities—the equivalent of lead actors in their own fictionalized life stories.

    Using Twitter, young people can pretend they are worth “following,” as though they have real-life fans, when all that is really happening is the mutual fanning of false love and false fame.

    Using computer games, our sons and daughters can pretend they are Olympians, Formula 1 drivers, rock stars or sharpshooters. And while they can turn off their Wii and Xbox machines and remember they are really in dens and playrooms on side streets and in triple deckers around America, that is after their hearts have raced and heads have swelled with false pride for “being” something they are not.

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2013/...#ixzz2HRvc4d7G
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  2. #2  
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
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    It's all about this phoney "self-esteem" shit.

    http://members.socket.net/~mcruzan/images/allen-west.jpg

    Four boxes keep us free: the soap box, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box.

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    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    We used to call this behavior spoiled brats, everybody has to have a string of initials to define their dysfunction today, and it is never your own fault.
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    ...everybody has to have a string of initials to define their dysfunction today,...
    Such as MBA, JD, PhD,.........

    http://members.socket.net/~mcruzan/images/allen-west.jpg

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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I read a book last year called Hurt 2.0. It was a Christian ministry to kids kind of book, but the guy who wrote it spent a lot of time with teens through teaching and through groups like Young Life and laid out how isolated our kids are from the adults in their lives. They value their peers more, mainly because their parents have been too busy with their lives to be involved with those of their children, so they filled that absence with peers, and the approval of the peer group supercedes any family bond. There was a lot more to the book overall, and I think that parents who are involved with their children raise kids who end up either being able to resist the peer group pressure or who end up being the leaders of their peer groups.


    After reading it, I realized that the problems that used to be pretty much exclusively those of children in the foster care system 25 years ago and more, when I was new in the field or a teen myself, are now pretty common among average teenagers.
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    We are looking at another example of the ensuing issues caused by the decaying family structure. Instead of getting their sense of self worth from their family, faith and from the tangible outcome of hard work and study, children seem to be getting it from their peers and then filtering out the negative. The schools teach them that no one fails (when in the real world people fail all the time) so when they do fail they don't know how to learn from the experience. If you give a kid a trophy simply because he played on a baseball team where is the incentive to get better at the sport? Why work harder than the rest for something everyone is going to get anyways. On top of this society tells them how great it is that they got the trophy even though they only had to show up to get it.

    We wonder where the narcissism and arrogance of our children have comes from. It comes from the failed society to which we turned our children over. A failed society tells its self how great it is and then tells its members that they are great because they are members, all the while both spiral into an existence that is less than mediocre.

    Parents stick their children in daycare centers because they are too busy to raise them and then are surprised when the children grow up and put their parents in nursing homes. This is what we taught them to do. Too busy to be bothered with responsibilities and unwilling to make the hard choice then let some one else deal with the issue. This is the ultimate end of narcissism, to see your life as more important than the life you created or the life that created you.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    This article is an important read for anyone who is concerned about the direction pop culture has taken....
    I don't find it surprising at all and I don't think it has to do with video games. It has to do with the dumbing down of high school.

    When my mom and dad went to high school they graduated with the ability to read as well as speak the English language to the degree that they could diagram sentences and do all that tense and agreement stuff. Mom learned math sufficient to breeze college and then handle huge sums of government money for the Navy. Dad learned math well enough to go to a prestigious engineering school. They both learned science (biology, chemistry, earth), real science even in the dark ages.

    By the time I came along, high school was "boring". Sure, there were high end classes but what future millionaire needs to study chemistry? I glided through high school and most of college on above average intelligence combined with some serious Catholic school education and a few testing tricks taught in my high school.

    Now high schools are proud of themselves when the graduates can read instructions and fill out job applications at Walmart all by themselves. Perhaps not that simpleminded, but it seems that a lot of our high school students lack a sixth grade education. So the kids who are intelligent and who do learn can either work themselves to death in AP courses so they can go to medical school, or they can glide through high school, and then glide through a BA, figuring that nothing really matters until grad school anyway.
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    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I don't find it surprising at all and I don't think it has to do with video games. It has to do with the dumbing down of high school.

    When my mom and dad went to high school they graduated with the ability to read as well as speak the English language to the degree that they could diagram sentences and do all that tense and agreement stuff. Mom learned math sufficient to breeze college and then handle huge sums of government money for the Navy. Dad learned math well enough to go to a prestigious engineering school. They both learned science (biology, chemistry, earth), real science even in the dark ages.

    By the time I came along, high school was "boring". Sure, there were high end classes but what future millionaire needs to study chemistry? I glided through high school and most of college on above average intelligence combined with some serious Catholic school education and a few testing tricks taught in my high school.

    Now high schools are proud of themselves when the graduates can read instructions and fill out job applications at Walmart all by themselves. Perhaps not that simpleminded, but it seems that a lot of our high school students lack a sixth grade education. So the kids who are intelligent and who do learn can either work themselves to death in AP courses so they can go to medical school, or they can glide through high school, and then glide through a BA, figuring that nothing really matters until grad school anyway.
    Once that dumbing down of high school began the other things like video games, violent movies, trophies for all, etc became players in the issue.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    Once that dumbing down of high school began the other things like video games, violent movies, trophies for all, etc became players in the issue.

    I'm waiting for someone to make the connection between video games and pot. Seriously, the only people I am acquainted with (ie the guys I hire for menial labor) who are totally into video games are potheads.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I'm waiting for someone to make the connection between video games and pot. Seriously, the only people I am acquainted with (ie the guys I hire for menial labor) who are totally into video games are potheads.
    I don't think that one causes the other. But I do think that character and personal behavior, absent any psychological disorder, learned from earliest childhood would lead an individual to either or both. The desire for instant gratification plays into this.

    http://members.socket.net/~mcruzan/images/allen-west.jpg

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