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  1. #1 Detroit Conspiracy Theories of my coworkers 
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I wasn't sure whether to post this in GD or lounge, but it is really funny in a sad way.


    When I came in this morning, some of my young, female coworkers were discussing the latest story-the Wayne County Prosecutor's office is discussing ways to save money, and that they don't have enough staff to cover the court's docket. The Prosecutor's office is headed by Kym Worthy, who was the assistant prosecutor who took on the cops who killed Malice Green, which means that 20 years ago, the black citizens of Detroit loved her and most white cops in the area hated her.

    The County Executive, Robert Ficano, who has been caught up in some scandals of his own in the past couple of years involving airport contracts (the biggest source of corruption in Wayne County government), told Worthy that she should have handled her budget better. I guess one of the proposals to save money is to let burglars walk the first two times they are picked up, and charge them the 3rd time. I'm not sure on that.

    The women at work have a theory that the reason Kym Worthy prosecuted Kwame Kilpatrick was because he jilted her. I said "I never heard that one, and she only prosecuted him on the perjury charges that he served a couple of months for a while back. The feds are the ones who got him this time". One woman said "I'll never forgive her for sending that fine-looking man to prison", another said "the only reason she went after him for perjury is because he didn't want her".

    I finally said "You got to be kidding me-did you see any of the evidence the feds had on him? Did you see what exactly Kwame was convicted of? He didn't even cooperate with his conditions of probation from the perjury case, and his perjury cost the city $9 million. He's arrogant and a thug."

    I like my coworkers, but these are the young ones, not the women my age. I would think that they are putting something in the water, but all of us in the burbs drink the same water.
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    Noonie, you're not that naive are you? This is a black culture thing. Black women are expected to stand by their black brothers regardless of what they do. When they don't, other black women are the first to excoriate them. If Kilpatrick had been white, they'd be cheering Worthy on. I've seen this a lot over the years. It's part of what played into the OJ trial. Underneath it all is the feeling that the black male is being destroyed--and there is a lot of truth to that if you look at the incarceration and murder rates. The black community tries to counter this by supporting the males regardless of their actions.

    Yeah, I know. Racist. But it's really not. Those attitudes exist and they are strong.
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    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I wasn't sure whether to post this in GD or lounge, but it is really funny in a sad way.


    When I came in this morning, some of my young, female coworkers were discussing the latest story-the Wayne County Prosecutor's office is discussing ways to save money, and that they don't have enough staff to cover the court's docket. The Prosecutor's office is headed by Kym Worthy, who was the assistant prosecutor who took on the cops who killed Malice Green, which means that 20 years ago, the black citizens of Detroit loved her and most white cops in the area hated her.

    The County Executive, Robert Ficano, who has been caught up in some scandals of his own in the past couple of years involving airport contracts (the biggest source of corruption in Wayne County government), told Worthy that she should have handled her budget better. I guess one of the proposals to save money is to let burglars walk the first two times they are picked up, and charge them the 3rd time. I'm not sure on that.

    The women at work have a theory that the reason Kym Worthy prosecuted Kwame Kilpatrick was because he jilted her. I said "I never heard that one, and she only prosecuted him on the perjury charges that he served a couple of months for a while back. The feds are the ones who got him this time". One woman said "I'll never forgive her for sending that fine-looking man to prison", another said "the only reason she went after him for perjury is because he didn't want her".

    I finally said "You got to be kidding me-did you see any of the evidence the feds had on him? Did you see what exactly Kwame was convicted of? He didn't even cooperate with his conditions of probation from the perjury case, and his perjury cost the city $9 million. He's arrogant and a thug."

    I like my coworkers, but these are the young ones, not the women my age. I would think that they are putting something in the water, but all of us in the burbs drink the same water.
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    Noonie, you're not that naive are you? This is a black culture thing. Black women are expected to stand by their black brothers regardless of what they do. When they don't, other black women are the first to excoriate them. If Kilpatrick had been white, they'd be cheering Worthy on. I've seen this a lot over the years. It's part of what played into the OJ trial. Underneath it all is the feeling that the black male is being destroyed--and there is a lot of truth to that if you look at the incarceration and murder rates. The black community tries to counter this by supporting the males regardless of their actions.

    Yeah, I know. Racist. But it's really not. Those attitudes exist and they are strong.

    I would say that it is a race thing, except that my black colleagues who are my age and older hate Kwame at this point, and like Kym Worthy. I had a coworker a little older than me once say she liked Kwame's eyes, but she still wanted him to go to jail for his crimes. It's an age and race thing.


    I swear, though, some of my younger female colleagues-they will defend a useless scumbag like Kwame, and in the next breath, refer to their good man by the n word.
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    Senior Member Eupher's Avatar
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    Well, to a lot of blacks, the "n" word isn't a pejorative like it is when a white person uses that word. Just look at Chris Rock and a few dozen other black "comedians" and it's a hard press to get them NOT to use that term.

    But more to the point, there shouldn't be any question that in the greater Detroit area - Scumbag Central that it is - the culture that runs rampant there is to excuse and justify the arrogant "leaders" simply because it's another dumbass way for some same scumbags to get over on "the man."

    Dirtbags like Kwame are too stupid to realize that he IS "the man." The rest utterly fail to see the hypocrisy.
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eupher View Post
    Well, to a lot of blacks, the "n" word isn't a pejorative like it is when a white person uses that word. Just look at Chris Rock and a few dozen other black "comedians" and it's a hard press to get them NOT to use that term.

    But more to the point, there shouldn't be any question that in the greater Detroit area - Scumbag Central that it is - the culture that runs rampant there is to excuse and justify the arrogant "leaders" simply because it's another dumbass way for some same scumbags to get over on "the man."

    Dirtbags like Kwame are too stupid to realize that he IS "the man." The rest utterly fail to see the hypocrisy.

    One thing I have learned is that when a black woman refers to her man by the n word, she is usually really pissed off at him.

    You grew up around here-you would like Charlie LeDuff's book. It's title is Detroit: An American Autopsy". He tells a great story about meeting Monica Conyers at Baker's Keyboard Lounge and how she grabbed his crotch, claiming that she was looking for a wire.
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I would say that it is a race thing, except that my black colleagues who are my age and older hate Kwame at this point, and like Kym Worthy. I had a coworker a little older than me once say she liked Kwame's eyes, but she still wanted him to go to jail for his crimes. It's an age and race thing.

    Remember that the older women weren't being fed the same tripe as the younger ones, either on TV, in the educational system, or in college classes about race. Some current theories of race promote racial solidarity at the expense of everything else, especially the dignity and worth of black women. I once met a black male psychologist on a university campus who explained to me in great detail why black men needed to be empowered and black women needed to step back. His rationale was that black women had always had access to the white world as domestics, while black men did not have that access. He also pointed out that black women were being promoted in workplaces (especially public sector) while black men were being left behind. I'm not kidding. This was his rationale. His idea was that black women needed to let black men be men, and that a black female heading her household and supporting her children (because her man had left) was, somehow, disempowering black men. He was not happy when I pointed out that most black females headed households out of necessity, not out of any desire to weaken black men.

    And remember, this guy was teaching courses at the university, in psychology. The younger generation of females has been exposed to this view that black men need to be supported, as if female support is the only thing that makes men men. Often this idea of support borders on self-abnegation and even masochism, as in staying with an abusive husband or boyfriend. This kind of belief system is what happens when one group needs to blame another for their own faults; remember, men have been blaming women for their sins since Eve gave Adam the apple. In the black community, this kind of blame has increased over past decades because the stats are still so bad for black men, and blaming whites doesn't help to explain the things that happen within the community.


    I swear, though, some of my younger female colleagues-they will defend a useless scumbag like Kwame, and in the next breath, refer to their good man by the n word.
    Kwame had "made it" with his high salary and public profile. The fact that criminality was the underpinning for his success is of secondary importance. The men these women are with probably are not making the money that Kwame was, nor do they have the status. Amoral materialism is certainly not restricted to any specific community--many Democratic women respected that scumbag Bill Clinton and, I'm sure, found their own husbands wanting, despite Clinton's own criminality.
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    Senior Member Eupher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    One thing I have learned is that when a black woman refers to her man by the n word, she is usually really pissed off at him.

    You grew up around here-you would like Charlie LeDuff's book. It's title is Detroit: An American Autopsy". He tells a great story about meeting Monica Conyers at Baker's Keyboard Lounge and how she grabbed his crotch, claiming that she was looking for a wire.
    I hadn't leard of LeDuff (unlike Jac LeGoff, who's probably dead now -- I fled the Detroit area the first time in 1975 and the second and final time in 1997) until you mentioned him, but I downloaded the Kindle version of the book off of Amazon.

    Thanks for the recommendation. I should get a lot of laughs out of it.

    Detroit is good for something besides "Oh Gawd, there goes another confirmed disaster." Maybe reading will get me to go back there and visit.

    On the other hand, it'll take take more than a book to get me to go back there unless it's for a funeral.
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