Thread: More about Oil, Gas and the hunting and capturing thereof.

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  1. #1 More about Oil, Gas and the hunting and capturing thereof. 
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    This Week in Petroleum History – March 18 to March 24

    March 18, 1937 – Odorless Natural Gas Explosion devastates East Texas School
    With just minutes left in the school day – and more than 700 students and teachers inside the building – a natural gas explosion destroys the New London High School in Rusk County, Texas.
    Odorless natural gas has leaked into the basement and ignited – with a force felt even four miles away. Roughnecks rush in from the nearby East Texas oilfield to save their children.
    Despite rescue efforts, 298 people are killed (dozens more later die of injuries). The cause of the school explosion is found to be an electric wood-shop saw that sparked unscented gas that had pooled beneath and in the walls of the school.

    <snip>

    As a result of this disaster, Texas and other states soon pass laws requiring that natural gas be mixed with a malodorant to give early warning of a gas leak.

    March 20, 1919 – American Petroleum Institute founded
    Founded in New York City, the American Petroleum Institute relocated to Washington, D.C. in 1929. It today maintains standards and recommended practices to promote the use of safe equipment and proven engineering practices – and has produced more than 600 technical standards covering all aspects of the oil and natural gas industry.

    March 20, 1973 – Pennsylvania Boom Town listed in Historic Registry
    Managed by the Drake Well Museum, the Pithole Visitors Center includes a diorama of the vanished boomtown.
    The former oil boom town of Pithole, Pennsylvania, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
    Discovered in January 1865, the Pithole Creek field creates a massive – although short lived – oil boom town for the young petroleum industry, which began in nearby Titusville in 1859.
    Pithole’s first well produced a 250-barrel-a-day gusher. As the news spread through Venango County, “everyone came to the Pithole area to try their luck,” notes one historian.

    March 24, 1989 – Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
    Field studies continue to examine the effects of the Exxon supertanker’s disastrous grounding on Bligh Reef in Alaska’s Prince William Sound in 1989.
    “No one anticipated any unusual problems as the Exxon Valdez left the Alyeska Pipeline Terminal at 9:12 p.m., Alaska Standard Time, on March 23, 1989,” begins a 1990 account by the Alaska Oil Spill Commission.

    <snip>.

    “Eight of 11 cargo tanks were punctured. Computations aboard the Exxon Valdez showed that 5.8 million gallons had gushed out of the tanker in the first three and a quarter hours.”

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  2. #2  
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    Richard Lau took it upon himself to offer a series of vids (from mostly and engineering perspective) on the industry and has made it available to the general public for anyone wishing to know more about the industry.

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  3. #3  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    And finally (for tonight anyway)

    Pelosiums views:

    “I believe in natural gas as a clean, cheap alternative to fossil fuels,” she said at one point. Natural gas “is cheap, abundant and clean compared to fossil fuels,” she said at another.


    Update: “She knows it [natural gas] is a fossil fuel but includes it because compared to other fossil fuels (coal and oil) it burns more cleanly,” said Pelosi’s spokesman, Brendan Daly. “Also, it is plentiful domestically and cheaper.”


    Sure she does - but did she when she opened her uninformed and empty mind in front of witnesses?
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  4. #4  
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    This week in Petroleum History: 4/1 - 4/7

    April 1, 1911 – First “Pump Jack Capital of Texas” Discovery

    The April 1, 1911, well brought prosperity to Electra, Texas, where citizens celebrated the discovery’s centennial.
    Just south of the Red River border with Oklahoma, near Electra, Texas, the Clayco Oil & Pipe Line Company’s Clayco No. 1 well launches an oil boom that lasts for decades.
    “As news of the gusher spread through town, people thought it was an April Fools joke and didn’t take it seriously until they saw for themselves the plume of black oil spewing high into the sky,” notes one Electra historian. “That day secured Electra’s place in the history books as being one of the most significant oil discoveries in the nation.”


    April 1, 1986 – Oil Prices hit Modern Low

    World oil prices fall below $10 a barrel – a new low for the modern petroleum industry.
    Causes include excessive OPEC production, worldwide recession (increasing supplies with declining demand) and a U.S. petroleum industry heavily regulated by production or price controls.
    The record peak of oil prices will be $145 per barrel in July 2008 – before a price collapse to below $32 by the end of the year.


    April 2, 1980 – Carter signs Windfall Profit Tax
    One year after lifting price controls on oil, President Jimmy Carter signs the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax (WPT) into law. The controversial WPT imposes an excise tax on oil production.

    President Jimmy Carter signs into law the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax.
    “From 1980 to 1988, the nation levied a special tax on domestic oil production,” explains historian Joseph Thorndike. Policymakers, “imposed an excise levy on domestic oil production, taxing the difference between the market price of oil and a predetermined base price.”
    The base price is derived from 1979 oil prices and requires annual adjustments for inflation. A remnant of President Richard Nixon’s general wage and price freeze of 1971 – WPT is meant to limit increases in oil prices.
    However, “the windfall profits tax has nothing to do, in fact, with profits,” observed the Washington Post in 1979. “It is an excise tax – that is, a tax on each barrel of oil produced.”
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    What Are The Top Five Facts Everyone Should Know About Oil Exploration?

    1) Oil is important. Shockingly, sometimes horrifically important.

    2) It’s big. Capital B-I-G BIG. You have no idea how big oil is.

    3) Oil is wealth. Not just wealth for producers, but wealth for everyone who uses it.

    4) The oil industry is a really safe place to work.

    “To really put safety in perspective, the average 2.1 TRIR for rig operations is lower than [OSHA’s] 3.3 TRIR for real estate. You are safer statistically on the rig floor than driving around with a real estate agent.”

    Land rigs have about the same injury rate as a regular construction job, and offshore rigs have a lower injury rate than being a teacher.
    5) Oil companies don’t really make that much money.



    Top line: Microsoft
    Middle: Apple
    Bottom: Exxon
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  6. #6  
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    Oil: The Other Gold

    "Every year there's more gold available, but oil is a diminishing resource,"
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    Gasland Part II Leaves Landowners Out on the Streets


    Some familiar faces were allowed in, and some even had reserved seating in the theater. Yoko Ono, where is your experience in engineering, hydrology, geology and chemistry? Mr. Hinchey, where is your experience in the same sciences? (Hinchey’s claim to fame in this discussion is being a co-author of the FRAC Act, one of Josh Fox’s pet projects — an ironic development given Fox’s decrying of lobbying and influence in the movie.) Yoko Ono, Maurice Hinchey (my ex-Congressman), HBO Producers, and Fox’s whole family, just to name a few, were all allowed to watch the film they traveled to see and had paid for. Why wasn’t I?
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  8. #8  
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    There are some disconcerting discrepancies in here but all-in-all it's pretty straight forward and accurate.


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  9. #9  
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    What If We Never Run Out of Oil?

    Cut out the AGW nonsense and it's a very long but essentially good article.

    Says the same thing I always have, "we'll never run out of oil." - what we will do is reach the point where it is too expensive to use as motor fuel. But.... the new technologies keep giving us more time to move on to the next energy source.

    Note - even the methane hydrate is finite.
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  10. #10 The abiotic oil theory/practice... 
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    A couple of years ago I had occasion to 'google' "abiotic oil"; in relationship to Russia's withholding pipeline delivery of natural gas in some part of NE Europe. At the time I was puzzled as to how, all of a sudden, Russia became "energy independent".

    Here are just two links having to do with the subject of abiotic oil. It is 'viewed' as a theory, but Russia has been drilling to the mantel and actually producing for several years now.

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/crispin/crispin11.html

    http://viewzone.com/abioticoilx.html

    So, it appears that in reality we are "all set" petroleum-wise, and we had better start burning more of the stuff (including coal) if we want to escape the next scheduled ice age. HA.
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." author Will Rogers
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