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  1. #1 May 7, 1920 – Erle Halliburton launches Halliburton 
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    The Halliburton Company is organized as an oil well “cementing” company in Wilson, Oklahoma, by Erle P. Halliburton (1892–1957), succeeding his New Method Oil Cementing Company formed a year earlier during the Burkburnett boom in Texas.
    The use of cement in drilling oil wells remains integral to the industry, because its injection into the well seals off water formations from the oil, protects the casing, and minimizes the danger of blowouts.

    Halliburton’s company, which will reach global dimensions within his lifetime, in 1922 patents a new “jet-cement” mixer that increases the speed and quality of the mixing process. By the end of the year, 17 Halliburton trucks are cementing wells in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

    “Despite his success, Halliburton continued to tinker with technology,” notes one historian. He introduced cement pumps powered by truck motors rather than steam from rig boilers and a device that allowed the testing of a formation without setting casing.
    “Major advances in cementing technology also ensued,” explains William Pike. Halliburton was the first to offer self-contained cementing units operating under their own power.
    Pike adds that in 1949 Halliburton and Stanolind Oil Company will make oilfield history with the first commercial application of hydraulic fracturing to increase oil and natural gas production.
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  2. #2 This brings back memories... 
    Senior Member Jim54's Avatar
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    When Haliburton would cement our surface casing we would have a bunch of empty 5 gallon buckets and snag as much of the excess cement as we could out of the surface ditch and pour little pads out by the shale shaker, jet manifold (many rigs then used earthen pits and old rotary shakers) and anywhere else we could. A boot without mud is a happy boot!
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  3. #3  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    And there was always excess cement.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    Live every day as if it were your last, because one of these days, it will be.
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