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  1. #1 Liberal Movies 
    Junior Member Machete's Avatar
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    I watch a lot of movies. Far more than the average person should. As a conservative this can be distressing though, because although I love movies many if not most of them sneak in some liberal subtext, social commentary, or jabs at conservatives. I'm going to list a few examples:



    I Netflixed this movie this movie the other day thinking I was going to be watching a contemporary western/murder mystery, but what I got was a one sided analysis of boarder politics. Here is a review I submitted to Amazon. " I thought I was going to be watching a modern day western/who done it. Instead I received a dissertation on race relations at the boarder, and a story centered around an infallible protagonist. It reminds me a lot of "Higher Learning" in which all the progressive minded characters are empathetic sages of wisdom, and any conservative characters are one dimensional xenophobic bigots. So like another reviewer stated, it's basically a story that could've been told in 10 minutes inflated into an over two hour opus so that its writer/director can push a thinly veiled political agenda. In the end conservatives will enjoy this about as much as liberals love Red Dawn. Your enjoyment of this movie depends on your political affiliation and if you like being preached to."



    This movie perpetuates the liberal fantasy that all conservatives are closet homosexuals. In fact the more anti-gay you are the higher the chance is that you're a homosexual.




    Conservatives are evil and will destroy our own planet and the rest of the universe in the name of capitalism. That's the message of this movie in a nutshell. James Cameron has come out in support of eco-terrorism. That is interesting because his mansion has more than 6 times the square footage of my house, and he owns a fleet of vehicles. It's okay that he owns a Corvette and some firetrucks because he owns a Chevy Volt and a Tesla S Model to cancel them out. I love the liberal celebrity mantra of "Do as I say not as I do".



    I've actually never seen this movie but the plot is priceless.

    "Sixteen-year-old Tru has been raised in San Francisco by two lesbian mothers and two gay fathers. When one of her mothers gets a well-paid job in a multi-cultural but more conservative suburb in Southern California, Tru and her mothers relocate.

    When Tru first starts at her new school, teachers welcome her but a group of male football jocks and their female friends bully her and say she looks like a "dyke." One of the footballers, Lodell, changes his mind about her and they start dating, but the relationship never becomes sexual. When they attend The Marvelous Wonderettes musical, Lodell flirts with a man. Tru's fathers suggest that Lodell is gay, and when Tru questions him he finally, reluctantly admits that he is a closeted homosexual. She tells him that she "doesn't want to be his Katie Holmes" but agrees to be his beard so he can continue to be accepted at school.

    Tru begins to spend time with Lodell's best friend, fellow footballer Manuel, but when he bullies openly-gay classmate Walter, Tru defends Walter and they become friends. They try to establish a Gay Straight Alliance and although a conservative teacher and a closeted English teacher refuse to support the group, the school drama teacher agrees to be the faculty sponsor. The first meeting is successful, with several people attending a long discussion on same-sex marriage in California, but during football practice at the same time, the coach calls the players "ladies," rants that "kids can't even say prayers in class, but the fags...get their own club!" He then asks his team if they want to "put a little muscles into these plays or go meet [their] boyfriends at the Gay Scouts of America," to which they answer that they want to "play ball."

    At the end of the Gay Straight Alliance meeting Tru meets a gay-rights supporter, hipster-geek senior Trevor. She initially thinks he's gay, but they quickly form an intimate relationship. Trevor, raised by his uncle, a gay fiction author, is open-minded about Tru's family arrangement. Later, Tru discovers that Lodell and Walter are sexually involved, and she ends her faux-relationship with Lodell. When Lodell and his teammates destroy a Gay Straight Alliance banner, Trevor sends out a mass coming out e-mail from Lodell's account. Tru is upset by this but eventually forgives him.

    Tru's mothers have a small backyard commitment ceremony attended by teachers and other locals. Lodell arrives to announce that he has left another faux-relationship, and he has the opportunity to reconcile with Walter and meet David Kopay. Manuel arrives with his football coach and punches Lodell for not revealing his sexuality. He refuses to accept homosexuality, but promises to continue being a friend to Lodell. Lodell performs a self-penned song, the school principical dances with Trevor's uncle, and the closeted English teacher is advised by friend and fellow teacher Ms. Maple (Jane Lynch) to be open about his sexuality. In the short final scene, Lodell comes out to his mother and grandmother and introduces Walter as his boyfriend."
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    Senior Member Generation Why?'s Avatar
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    I just like or don't like movies. They don't change my views.
    “A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.”Ayn Rand

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    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machete View Post
    <snip>
    Your name sake is a huge liberal movie.
    The Obama Administration: Deny. Deflect. Blame.
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  4. #4  
    Junior Member Machete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Your name sake is a huge liberal movie.
    Yeah I know, but it's been my internet alias long before that movie or Grindhouse were even written.
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    American Beauty is one of my favorite movies-not because of any political sway to it, but because Kevin Spacey is great in the role he plays. There are some great moments-like when he busts his wife with her lover. I really thought, until the very end, that his wife was going to be the one who killed him. But I know people who really hated this movie, not because of the twist with the neighbor's secret gayness, but because of Spacey's character's crush on the teenaged cheerleader. My mom had an issue with this-I said, but he ends up not doing anything with her because he realizes just how young (and stupid) she really is, which is exactly the right reason why he shouldn't get involved with her.

    I haven't seen any of the rest of those movies. The best movie I've seen in the last decade or so about race relations is "Black Snake Moan".
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  6. #6  
    Junior Member Machete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    American Beauty is one of my favorite movies-not because of any political sway to it, but because Kevin Spacey is great in the role he plays. There are some great moments-like when he busts his wife with her lover. I really thought, until the very end, that his wife was going to be the one who killed him. But I know people who really hated this movie, not because of the twist with the neighbor's secret gayness, but because of Spacey's character's crush on the teenaged cheerleader. My mom had an issue with this-I said, but he ends up not doing anything with her because he realizes just how young (and stupid) she really is, which is exactly the right reason why he shouldn't get involved with her.

    I haven't seen any of the rest of those movies. The best movie I've seen in the last decade or so about race relations is "Black Snake Moan".
    If I hated every movie with a liberal agenda there wouldn't be many movies for me to enjoy. I just like pointing them out and analyzing them. My favorite movie Aliens has plenty of liberal themes but they don't weigh down the film. American Beauty is a well crafted movie and is entertaining if you can ignore all the liberal subtext. It's too much for me, plus I've never been big on existentialist films.
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    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machete View Post
    If I hated every movie with a liberal agenda there wouldn't be many movies for me to enjoy. I just like pointing them out and analyzing them. My favorite movie Aliens has plenty of liberal themes but they don't weigh down the film. American Beauty is a well crafted movie and is entertaining if you can ignore all the liberal subtext. It's too much for me, plus I've never been big on existentialist films.
    Kindly explain the liberal message of Aliens.
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    Senior Member Generation Why?'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Kindly explain the liberal message of Aliens.
    Science?
    “A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.”Ayn Rand

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  9. #9  
    Junior Member Machete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Kindly explain the liberal message of Aliens.
    Anti-patriarchy, and corporate greed.

    "Aliens: Capitalism in the Future

    If Kirkhill is a weak, ineffectual capitalist who might be seen as the perfect embodiment of what Karl Marx referred to as "capitalist alienation," then Carter Burke (Paul Reiser), the capitalist at the heart of Aliens, is the perfect embodiment of the evil capitalist, the one who is the ultimate exploiter of the working class. This is especially unsettling when viewing the film as the future to The Abyss's present and Titanic's past. If anyone continues to insist on the legitimacy of Marx's predictions about the proletariat uprising, Aliens responds that it is still hasn't happened by the mid-twenty-first century.

    In the film, Burke is the antithesis of Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver), the hero. Ripley, the only surviving character from the original film, Alien (1979), is a traditional laborer, much like Bud Brigman. Earthy, natural, strong, and motherly, she is both an attractive and a powerful woman who can fight and labor alongside the tough marines with whom she travels to the planet LB-426 to investigate an apparent alien invasion into a colonial settlement.

    Aliens complicates the symbiotic capitalist/military relationship set up in The Abyss by making the interstellar marines much like The Abyss's likable oil drillers. The marines, ideologically, are subservient to the capitalists, a fact that is never so obvious as when Burke declares that the marine in charge, Corporal Hicks (Michael Biehn in a very different role from his role in The Abyss) cannot make an important monetary decision because "he's just a grunt." Read together, The Abyss and Aliens seem to suggest that the military is, more or less, at the whim of the capitalists. In The Abyss, the military men exercised a great deal of power, but it was power granted them by the capitalists. In Aliens, the military men are once again working with the capitalists, but over the course of the film, they begin to rebel. Either way, it is still the businessmen who are ultimately in charge.

    Aliens is even more insistent than The Abyss on the omnipresence of an all-powerful global capitalist "company." In The Abyss, the company was Benthic Petroleum; however, within the first hour of the film, the company is isolated from the action by a hurricane, leaving only its extension, the Navy SEAL team, to represent it. In Aliens, the "company" is perpetually present in the narrative in the character of Burke. Burke's employer is referred to only vaguely as "the Company," with the exception of one scene that displays a sign reading: "Weyland-Yutan Corp.—'Building Better Worlds.'" The irony is that the company is not building better worlds. Its vaguely insulting term for the terra-formers—the laborers who set up atmosphere processors to build these "better worlds"—is a "shake'n'bake colony," indicating how unimportant and expendable they are in the eyes of the company businessmen. In fact, the film makes clear that the rescue mission at the center of the narrative is hardly about saving the colonists; instead, it is about saving the "multimillion dollar installation."

    When Burke, ever the ambitious capitalist, realizes that the installation is a lost cause, he makes arrangements to use the hostile alien race—the cause of all his company's problems—as a source of revenue at the expense of Ripley and the marines. As Burke puts it to Ripley: "Look, those two specimens are worth millions to the bioweapons division, right? Now, if you're smart, we can both come out this heroes, and we will be set up for life." As Marx wrote: "The increase in the quantity of objects is accompanied by an extension of the realm of the alien powers to which man is subjected, and every new product represents a new potency for mutual swindling and mutual plundering" (61). In Aliens, the aliens themselves are the "new product" for Burke, and he is so intent on getting them for the company that his "swindling" and "plundering" involves the murder of everyone else around him. The film makes clear that it was he who was initially responsible for the deaths of the colonists by sending them to the derel ict alien spacecraft, and he then connives a murderous plan to sneak the alien embryos back for the company. Ripley explains to the marines:

    He [Burke] figured he could get an alien back through quarantine if one of us was impregnated—whatever you call it—and then frozen for the trip home. Nobody would know about the embryos we were carrying ... the only way he could do it is if he sabotaged certain freezers on the way home—namely yours. Then he could jettison the bodies and make up whatever story he wanted to.

    Burke is consumed with the notion of making money for the company, whereas everyone else in the outfit, with whom he is stranded on the planet and trapped by aliens, is worried only about simply staying alive. This is also depicted in an earlier scene when Ripley recommends destroying the entire complex as the only way to be sure all the aliens are killed. Burke's immediate response, informed only by his capitalist instinct, is: "Hold on, hold on, wait a second. This installation has a substantial dollar value attached to it ... this is a multimillion dollar installation. ..." Ripley sums up Burke and his obsession with monetary wealth—and, therefore, Cameron's filmic conception of capitalism run amok—perfectly when she says: "I don't know which species is worse, us or them [the aliens]. You don't see them fucking each other over for a goddamned percentage.""

    -JAMES KENDRICK is a doctoral student in film and media studies at Indiana University. His research interests include cinema history, cult and horror films, and popular culture.
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  10. #10  
    Sonnabend
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    And the rest of us just thought it was a movie, and that Ripley looks hot in Cottontails.
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