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  1. #1 We Post Nothing About Our Daughter Online 
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    We Post Nothing About Our Daughter Online
    Nothing. It’s the only way to defend her against facial recognition, Facebook profiling, and corporate data mining.
    http://www.slate.com/articles/techno...ne.single.html



    I vividly remember the Facebook post. It was my friend’s 5-year-old daughter “Kate,” (a pseudonym) standing outside of her house in a bright yellow bikini, the street address clearly visible behind her on the front door. A caption read “Leaving for our annual Labor Day weekend at the beach,” and beneath it were more than 50 likes and comments from friends—including many “friends” that Kate’s mom barely knew.

    The picture had been uploaded to a Facebook album, and there were 114 shots just of Kate: freshly cleaned and swaddled on the day of her birth … giving her Labradoodle a kiss … playing on a swing set. But there were also photos of her in a bathtub and an awkward moment posing in her mother’s lacy pink bra.

    I completely understood her parents’ desire to capture Kate’s everyday moments, because early childhood is so ephemeral. I also knew how those posts would affect Kate as an adult, and the broader impact of creating a generation of kids born into original digital sin.

    Last week, Facebook updated its privacy policy again. It reads in part: “We are able to suggest that your friend tag you in a picture by scanning and comparing your friend’s pictures to information we’ve put together from your profile pictures and the other photos in which you’ve been tagged.” Essentially, this means that with each photo upload, Kate’s parents are, unwittingly, helping Facebook to merge her digital and real worlds. Algorithms will analyze the people around Kate, the references made to them in posts, and over time will determine Kate’s most likely inner circle.

    The problem is that Facebook is only one site. With every status update, YouTube video, and birthday blog post, Kate’s parents are preventing her from any hope of future anonymity.

    That poses some obvious challenges for Kate’s future self. It’s hard enough to get through puberty. Why make hundreds of embarrassing, searchable photos freely available to her prospective homecoming dates? If Kate’s mother writes about a negative parenting experience, could that affect her ability to get into a good college? We know that admissions counselors review Facebook profiles and a host of other websites and networks in order to make their decisions.

    There’s a more insidious problem, though, which will haunt Kate well into the adulthood. Myriad applications, websites, and wearable technologies are relying on face recognition today, and ubiquitous bio-identification is only just getting started. In 2011, a group of hackers built an app that let you scan faces and immediately display their names and basic biographical details, right there on your mobile phone. Already developers have made a working facial recognition API for Google Glass. While Google has forbidden official facial recognition apps, it can’t prevent unofficial apps from launching. There’s huge value in gaining real-time access to view detailed information the people with whom we interact.

    The easiest way to opt-out is to not create that digital content in the first place, especially for kids. Kate’s parents haven’t just uploaded one or two photos of her: They’ve created a trove of data that will enable algorithms to learn about her over time. Any hopes Kate may have had for true anonymity ended with that ballet class YouTube channel....
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  2. #2  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    I came from a small town and long before computers there was no anonymity then either, everyone knew everything about everyone else. We are back where we started.
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    I came from a small town and long before computers there was no anonymity then either, everyone knew everything about everyone else. We are back where we started.
    Yeah, but back then, the Federal government didn't know everything about you.
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  4. #4  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Not then but they probably did when the country was founded

    Sent from my XT1049 using Tapatalk
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Not then but they probably did when the country was founded

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    Nah. If they had, the would have forestalled the Whiskey Rebellion.
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  6. #6  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Occupy whiskey street?

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    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Occupy whiskey street?

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    George Soros wasn't alive in 1791.
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  8. #8  
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    Hey check this out:

    The NSA wrote turkey-day talking points, because of course it did
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...course-it-did/

    ....Defenders of the spy agency might have found this set of talking points helpful. Distributed internally by the NSA the week before Thanksgiving and reported earlier today by Firedoglake, the two-pager — a literal set of bullet points — armed employees with verbal ammunition that they were encouraged to share "with family and close friends."

    As with previous sets of talking points prepared for top intelligence officials, this latest document isn't afraid to invoke 9/11. It also cites a common statistic about the effectiveness of NSA surveillance, claiming that it contributed to the disruption of 54 terrorist plots since 2001. Critics challenge this figure, saying that less than a handful of those cases can be realistically connected to the snooping.

    Another part of the talking points takes a thinly veiled shot at China.

    "NSA does not and will not steal industry secrets in order to give U.S. companies a competitive advantage," it reads. Beijing has, on occasion, been accused of conducting economic espionage as a way to advance its political interests.

    At other times, the talking points take a sloganeering turn.

    "NSA performs its mission exceptionally well," it reads (its emphasis). "We strive to be the best we can be, because that's what America requires as part of its defense in a dangerous world."...

    Click for Complete Talking Points Memo from the NSA-LOL!
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