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  1. #1 Obamacare national marketing campaign to cost $700 million 
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    Obamacare national marketing campaign to cost $700 million

    ...About 16 percent of Americans are uninsured, but despite years of political debate and media attention, more than three-quarters of them still know little about the law known as "Obamacare," according to recent surveys.

    "It's not sugar cereal, beer and detergent," said Brooke Foley, chief executive officer of the Chicago-based Jayne Agency, one of the advertising firms crafting messages to reach the uninsured.

    The Obama administration and many states are launching campaigns this summer to get the word out before enrollment for new benefits begins in October.

    The targets are mostly the working poor, young people who are disengaged, or those who gave up their insurance because of the cost. Three-quarters are white. Eighty-six percent have a high school education or less. Together they make up a blind spot in the nation's health care system...
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    Senior Member Meshuga Mikey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    Obamacare national marketing campaign to cost $700 million

    ...About 16 percent of Americans are uninsured, but despite years of political debate and media attention, more than three-quarters of them still know little about the law known as "Obamacare," according to recent surveys.

    "It's not sugar cereal, beer and detergent," said Brooke Foley, chief executive officer of the Chicago-based Jayne Agency, one of the advertising firms crafting messages to reach the uninsured.

    The Obama administration and many states are launching campaigns this summer to get the word out before enrollment for new benefits begins in October.

    The targets are mostly the working poor, young people who are disengaged, or those who gave up their insurance because of the cost. Three-quarters are white. Eighty-six percent have a high school education or less. Together they make up a blind spot in the nation's health care system...
    Together they make up a blind spot//PERIOD.

    hey if OBAMAS FOR IT...theyre ONBOARD though!!

    save the 600

    get obama a prime time interveiw on MTV...and the jobs DONE...FOR FREE
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    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Typical liberalism. The best way t sell a boondoggle is to throw money at it.
    The Obama Administration: Deny. Deflect. Blame.
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    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    Obamacare national marketing campaign to cost $700 million

    ...About 16 percent of Americans are uninsured, but despite years of political debate and media attention, more than three-quarters of them still know little about the law known as "Obamacare," according to recent surveys.

    "It's not sugar cereal, beer and detergent," said Brooke Foley, chief executive officer of the Chicago-based Jayne Agency, one of the advertising firms crafting messages to reach the uninsured.

    The Obama administration and many states are launching campaigns this summer to get the word out before enrollment for new benefits begins in October.

    The targets are mostly the working poor, young people who are disengaged, or those who gave up their insurance because of the cost. Three-quarters are white. Eighty-six percent have a high school education or less. Together they make up a blind spot in the nation's health care system...
    How can they enroll when the start date keeps getting pushed back?
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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    700 million to sell a boondoggle.

    But not 7 million to continue to provide a national test on civics and history?

    http://www.humanevents.com/2013/07/2...-to-disappear/

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress exams in civics, U.S. history, and geography have been indefinitely postponed for fourth and twelfth graders. The Obama administration says this is due to a $6.8 million sequestration budget cut. The three exams will be replaced by a single, new test: Technology and Engineering Literacy.

    “Without these tests, advocates for a richer civic education will not have any kind of test to use as leverage to get more civic education in the classrooms,” said John Hale, associate director at the Center for Civic Education.

    NAEP is a set of national tests of fourth, eighth, and twelfth graders that track achievement on various subjects over time. Researchers collect data for state to state comparisons in mathematics, reading, science, and writing. The other subjects only provide national statistics and are administered to fewer students. The tests provide basic information about students but do not automatically trigger consequences for teachers, students, and schools.

    Students have historically performed extremely poorly on these three tests. In 2010, the last administration of the history test, students performed worse on it than on any other NAEP test. That year, less than half of eighth-graders knew the purpose of the Bill of Rights, and only 1 in 10 could pick a definition of the system of checks and balance on the civics exam.

    Science vs. Humanities
    Since most civic education is taught to first-semester high school seniors, Hale said, not testing in twelfth grade creates a major gap of information.

    “Is it possible to have a responsible citizenry if we don’t teach them civics, history, and the humanities?” said Gary Nash, a professor of history education at the University of California Los Angeles. Postponing the exams, typically administered every four years, does not mean classroom education in the humanities will be cut. But the cuts indirectly say we can do without civics and U.S. history, Nash said.

    Trading the humanities tests for technology tests is necessary to measure “the competitiveness of U.S. students in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)-focused world,” said David Driscoll, chair of the NAEP Governing Board, in a statement. “The [Technology and Engineering Literacy] assessment, along with the existing NAEP science and mathematics assessments, will help the nation know if we are making progress in the areas of STEM education.”

    Nash agrees the U.S. needs more engineers and scientists: “But what are they without humanities under their belt?” he said....


    (It's my guess that it's not the budget: it's the final destruction of citizenship for the younger generation as they take their positions as technical drones.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post

    Nash agrees the U.S. needs more engineers and scientists: “But what are they without humanities under their belt?” he said....


    (It's my guess that it's not the budget: it's the final destruction of citizenship for the younger generation as they take their positions as technical drones.)
    It's going to be difficult to make engineers from 9th graders who can't read. Another problem is being competent in tech fields requires problem analysis, and problem solving. Logical thinking is needed. Mechanical, electrical, structural, thermal, etc. issues refuse to be fixed using nuanced solutions. I don't know the stats, but I'm sure flamin' libs in these fields are well under the overall average. If not, don't correct me. I'll be petrified every time I cross a bridge.
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rd-try View Post
    It's going to be difficult to make engineers from 9th graders who can't read. Another problem is being competent in tech fields requires problem analysis, and problem solving. Logical thinking is needed. Mechanical, electrical, structural, thermal, etc. issues refuse to be fixed using nuanced solutions. I don't know the stats, but I'm sure flamin' libs in these fields are well under the overall average. If not, don't correct me. I'll be petrified every time I cross a bridge.
    Understood. But they are using math and science deficiencies, which the Dept of Ed created in the first place, to scrap a test for civics knowledge, which, despite the claims of science, is far more important to citizenship in this nation than first derivatives.
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