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  1. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Two ways for Detroit to get some cash quickly and shore up some of it's debt:

    1. Sell/lease Belle Isle to the state for the deal that was offered earlier this year. It will give the city some cash and relieve it of a burden, upkeep-wise. The state will tear down the structures that need to be torn down and maintain the ones that are in good shape. It'll be safer, too.

    2. Make the Water Department into a regional body and give up the monopoly. All the suburbs buy their water from the city, and all the suburbs want it to be a cooperative, so that the city of Detroit no longer controls the water rates without any oversight from some of their largest customers. The burbs would have to buy in, which would give the city some cash to shore up pensions of retirees.



    Incidentally, the mayoral primary was held yesterday. The write-in white candidate, Mike Duggan, won with 53% of the vote, Sheriff Benny Napoleon came in second with 30% of the vote, so the race is on between them in November.
    You need to send your recommendations to both mayoral candidates. Both ideas sound very reasonable and could get the ball rolling.
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  2. #12  
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    There has been a demand for this sort of thing for decades now in all major cities focussed not on city services but on the performance disparity between urban and suburban schools. The big ass lie underlying this objective is that the city schools are "underfunded". Underfunded is one of those weasel words that "activists" like to use because it doesn't really mean anything, and usually isn't true.

    For example, Philadelphia schools are said to be underfunded because they are funded less than Lower Merion. In Detroit they say that the schools are underfunded because some suburban enclaves (The area has strange municipal school districts) spend a lot more per pupil than the city does. Of course this totally ignores that the lowest per pupil expenditure is also in a largely white Detroit suburb. Both the Detroit and Philadelphia schools spend over $9K per year per pupil which is the same as most places on the US map and higher than a lot of places on the US map.

    I have personally witnessed a de facto annex of a suburban county. When I was a kid, there were still farms inside the beltway in Prince Georges County. We had horses and neighbors had a mule and some chickens. Then in 1970 it was like Anacostia washed over PG County. Overnight people moved out, the schools went to hell, and we moved the following year. Not because black people moved next door, because the place had become dangerous.
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  3. #13  
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    Why did Anacostia begin the move to PG county? What prompted it?
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  4. #14  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    You need to send your recommendations to both mayoral candidates. Both ideas sound very reasonable and could get the ball rolling.
    I got them from Metro Times columnist Jack Lessenbury. The city knows these things, but fear losing control over them. The emergency manager probably will do both these things within the next few months.


    But I know what Reich is suggesting-isn't this what Miami did with Dade County some time ago?
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  5. #15  
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    Atlanta did the same thing back in the late 60's and early 70's even out to the county line in some places.

    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    There has been a demand for this sort of thing for decades now in all major cities focussed not on city services but on the performance disparity between urban and suburban schools. The big ass lie underlying this objective is that the city schools are "underfunded". Underfunded is one of those weasel words that "activists" like to use because it doesn't really mean anything, and usually isn't true.

    For example, Philadelphia schools are said to be underfunded because they are funded less than Lower Merion. In Detroit they say that the schools are underfunded because some suburban enclaves (The area has strange municipal school districts) spend a lot more per pupil than the city does. Of course this totally ignores that the lowest per pupil expenditure is also in a largely white Detroit suburb. Both the Detroit and Philadelphia schools spend over $9K per year per pupil which is the same as most places on the US map and higher than a lot of places on the US map.

    I have personally witnessed a de facto annex of a suburban county. When I was a kid, there were still farms inside the beltway in Prince Georges County. We had horses and neighbors had a mule and some chickens. Then in 1970 it was like Anacostia washed over PG County. Overnight people moved out, the schools went to hell, and we moved the following year. Not because black people moved next door, because the place had become dangerous.
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  6. #16  
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    The idea makes sense in a Liberal, 'Where can we find someone else's money to take fast?' and ignorant-of-the-law-of-unintended-consequences short-term thinking kind of way. In other words it's a one-budget-cycle solution for a fifty-year problem, and one with explosive boobytraps hidden in it to boot.
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbAss Tanker View Post
    The idea makes sense in a Liberal, 'Where can we find someone else's money to take fast?' and ignorant-of-the-law-of-unintended-consequences short-term thinking kind of way. In other words it's a one-budget-cycle solution for a fifty-year problem, and one with explosive boobytraps hidden in it to boot.
    Yep, once you spend the dowry the new bride can get expensive.
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
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  8. #18  
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    Read a great article about police abuse of civil forfeiture laws. The whole article can be found here:
    The Use and Abuse of Civil Forfeiture

    But there's a great section about Detroit:

    ...Another case involves a monthly social event that had been hosted by the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit. In the midst of festivities one evening in late May, 2008, forty-odd officers in black commando gear stormed the gallery and its rear patio, ordering the guests to the ground. Some in attendance thought that they were the victims of an armed robbery. One young woman who had fallen only to her knees told me that a masked figure screamed at her, “Bitch, you think you’re too pretty to get in the mud?” A boot from behind kicked her to the ground. The officers, including members of the Detroit Police Department’s vice squad and mobile tactical unit, placed the guests under arrest. According to police records, the gallery lacked proper city permits for after-hours dancing and drinking, and an old ordinance aimed at “blind pigs” (speakeasies) and other places of “illegal occupation” made it a crime to patronize such a place, knowingly or not.

    After lining the guests on their knees before a “prisoner processing table” and searching them, the officers asked for everyone’s car keys. Then the raid team seized every vehicle it could find, even venturing to the driveway of a young man’s friend nearly a mile away to retrieve his car. Forty-four cars were taken to government-contracted lots.

    Most of those detained had to pay more than a thousand dollars for the return of their cars; if payment wasn’t made promptly, the car would become city property. The proceeds were divided among the offices of the prosecutors, police, and towing companies. After the A.C.L.U. filed a suit against the city, a district court ruled that the raid was unconstitutional, and noted that it reflected “a widespread practice” by the police in the area. (The city is appealing the ruling.) Vice statutes have lent themselves to such forfeiture efforts; in previous years, an initiative targeted gay men for forfeiture, under Detroit’s “annoying persons” ordinance. Before local lawyers challenged such practices, known informally as “Bag a Fag,” undercover officers would arrest gay men who simply returned their glances or gestures, if the signals were deemed to have sexual connotations, and then, citing “nuisance abatement,” seize their vehicles.

    Detroit Police Department officials have said that raids like the one on the Contemporary Art Institute are aimed at improving “quality of life.” The raids certainly help address the department’s substantial budgetary shortfalls. Last year, Detroit, which has since filed for bankruptcy, cut the annual police budget by nearly a fifth. Today, “blind pig” raids around the city routinely result in the confiscation of dozens, sometimes hundreds, of cars....
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  9. #19  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    Read a great article about police abuse of civil forfeiture laws. The whole article can be found here:
    The Use and Abuse of Civil Forfeiture

    But there's a great section about Detroit:

    ...Another case involves a monthly social event that had been hosted by the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit. In the midst of festivities one evening in late May, 2008, forty-odd officers in black commando gear stormed the gallery and its rear patio, ordering the guests to the ground. Some in attendance thought that they were the victims of an armed robbery. One young woman who had fallen only to her knees told me that a masked figure screamed at her, “Bitch, you think you’re too pretty to get in the mud?” A boot from behind kicked her to the ground. The officers, including members of the Detroit Police Department’s vice squad and mobile tactical unit, placed the guests under arrest. According to police records, the gallery lacked proper city permits for after-hours dancing and drinking, and an old ordinance aimed at “blind pigs” (speakeasies) and other places of “illegal occupation” made it a crime to patronize such a place, knowingly or not.

    After lining the guests on their knees before a “prisoner processing table” and searching them, the officers asked for everyone’s car keys. Then the raid team seized every vehicle it could find, even venturing to the driveway of a young man’s friend nearly a mile away to retrieve his car. Forty-four cars were taken to government-contracted lots.

    Most of those detained had to pay more than a thousand dollars for the return of their cars; if payment wasn’t made promptly, the car would become city property. The proceeds were divided among the offices of the prosecutors, police, and towing companies. After the A.C.L.U. filed a suit against the city, a district court ruled that the raid was unconstitutional, and noted that it reflected “a widespread practice” by the police in the area. (The city is appealing the ruling.) Vice statutes have lent themselves to such forfeiture efforts; in previous years, an initiative targeted gay men for forfeiture, under Detroit’s “annoying persons” ordinance. Before local lawyers challenged such practices, known informally as “Bag a Fag,” undercover officers would arrest gay men who simply returned their glances or gestures, if the signals were deemed to have sexual connotations, and then, citing “nuisance abatement,” seize their vehicles.

    Detroit Police Department officials have said that raids like the one on the Contemporary Art Institute are aimed at improving “quality of life.” The raids certainly help address the department’s substantial budgetary shortfalls. Last year, Detroit, which has since filed for bankruptcy, cut the annual police budget by nearly a fifth. Today, “blind pig” raids around the city routinely result in the confiscation of dozens, sometimes hundreds, of cars....

    The Contemporary Art Institute is down the street from my office. I never heard about this, though. It's mostly suburbanites who hang out there, and I'm sure the DPD knew that when they raided the place. There's no money to be made from shaking down Detroit residents and holding their cars for ransom.


    I had heard about the "Bag a Fag" thing, though. Most gay people I know don't hang out in Detroit after work hours-they go to Royal Oak or Ferndale.
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  10. #20  
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    "If Detroit is defined as the larger metro area that includes its suburbs, it has enough money to provide all its residents with adequate if not good public services, without falling into bankruptcy."

    In other words, little Bobby wants to redistribute the poverty. Brilliant!
    "The beauty of the Second Amendment is that you won't need it until they try to take it away."---Thomas Jefferson

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