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  1. #61  
    Senior Member Molon Labe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Artless.
    I'm not the one claiming the narrow view of "the poor". Nor am I making the simpleton claim that an election turns on Cuccinelli's view on gay butt sex.
    Gun Control: The theory that a woman found dead in an alley, raped and strangled with her panty hose, is somehow morally superior to a woman explaining to police how her attacker got that fatal bullet wound - Unknown


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  2. #62  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Interesting article from National Review on the election. Nova will object to Ralph Reed being the author, but the analysis rings true to me, especially the McAuliffe spending spree.



    The Corner
    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner...won-ralph-reed

    Why Cuccinelli Lost . . . and How We Might Have Won


    By Ralph Reed

    November 6, 2013 12:03 PM

    The very tight and hard-fought Virginia governor’s race has now concluded, and for the first time since 1969 a gubernatorial candidate of the party holding the White House has won in the Old Dominion.

    McAuliffe won by a very narrow margin, even though polls had shown him with a lead of seven to ten points. The reason? A superior conservative and GOP ground game, a failure of Obama voters to turn out for McAuliffe, and the meltdown of Obamacare over the past two weeks, which closed the race to a statistical dead heat.

    Still, Cuccinelli lost a race that he once led. The question is why, and was it ever in the cards for him? There were many factors in the outcome, some of which Cuccinelli could have controlled, and others that were beyond his control.

    First, the GOP was divided. Then–attorney general Bob McDonnell and Lieutenant Governor Bill Bolling agreed heading into the 2009 election that McDonnell would run for governor first, then Bolling would run for governor in 2013 and McDonnell would back him. Cuccinelli was not a party to this arrangement and never felt bound by it. He chose to run for governor anyway, which was his right. But by changing the nominating process from a primary to a convention, his supporters backed Bolling into a corner (Cuccinelli likely would have won a primary as well), forcing him out of the race. Bolling refused to support Cuccinelli, many of his supporters and donors sat on their hands, and the GOP was hopelessly divided. This stood in stark contrast to the party unity that led to victory four years earlier, and it was a major factor in the outcome. If you want to win, it’s fine to have a heated intramural struggle (certainly Hillary Clinton and Obama did in 2008), but you must mend fences when it is over. The GOP needed everyone on the field to win, and that did not happen.

    The same disunity has been seen in the Virginia post-mortems. The Wall Street Journal has pointed to the Tea Party–driven shutdown as causing Cuccinelli’s defeat, while talk-radio hosts are blaming the Republican National Committee for spending far less in Virginia in 2013 than it did in 2009. Neither factor was the main reason for Cuccinelli’s coming up short, but the fact that GOP factions are still organizing a circular firing squad shows that the party remains divided, and it will not win consistently until it is unified.

    Second, Cuccinelli was badly outspent. In fact, by being lapped by $15 million, he probably suffered the worst financial disadvantage of any gubernatorial candidate in modern Virginia political history. McAuliffe raised $34.4 million to Cuccinelli’s $19.7 million and in the final weeks was outspending him up to ten to one on television in major markets like Washington, D.C. In 2009 the opposite was the case: Bob McDonnell raised $21 million to Creigh Deeds’s $16 million. McDonnell’s advantage was starker in the closing weeks; in October he outspent Deeds two to one on television.

    Cuccinelli’s funding disadvantage was exacerbated by the fact that he had won every previous race in his political career while being heavily outspent. In 2009 his opponent outspent him three to one in the closing weeks, yet Cuccinelli won handily. The same was true in his campaigns for state senate. This created a false belief that his strong grassroots support could overcome losing the air war in a rout. But down-the-ballot races are not the same as being at the top of the ticket. Cuccinelli needed to be more financially competitive with McAuliffe, especially after Labor Day when the race began to slip away.

    Third, Cuccinelli remained attorney general as he ran for governor, a break with recent tradition. Previous elected attorney generals (ten of the past eleven) had resigned to avoid even the appearance of a conflict between their gubernatorial campaign and their responsibilities as chief law-enforcement officer of the commonwealth. The only Virginia attorney general since World War II who remained in office while running for governor was Marshall Coleman in 1981, and he lost. In fairness, Cuccinelli argued that pending litigation required his attention and he felt obligated to finish the work to which he had been elected. That was an admirable character trait. But when gifts from a major donor to Governor McDonnell surfaced (and the same donor also had given gifts to Cuccinelli), the attorney general’s office became involved in a matter that affected Cuccinelli’s own campaign. Resigning earlier could have saved Cuccinelli from proximity to the issue, which was a drag on the campaign in the summer.

    Fourth, the government shutdown probably affected Virginia more than any other state in the country. As an ally of the tea-party movement, Cuccinelli was in a difficult position. If he condemned the shutdown, he alienated his most enthusiastic supporters. On the other hand, the Obamacare meltdown turned it into a winnable race in the closing weeks, and the exit polling does not indicate that the shutdown alone defeated Cuccinelli. That it made it more difficult for him to gain momentum at a critical point in the campaign is beyond dispute.

    Finally, Cuccinelli’s campaign never branded its candidate on kitchen-table issues for swing voters as McDonnell did with “Bob’s for Jobs,” Jim Gilmore did with his plan to abolish the car tax, and George Allen did in 1993 with welfare reform and eliminating parole for violent felons. Unapologetically conservative candidates will always be attacked by the media and the left, and they need issues to appeal beyond their core supporters to soft Democrats and moderate Republicans. These “John Warner” Republicans and “Mark Warner” Democrats are not ideologically driven, but they will respond to kitchen-table issues that speak to their real needs. Such branding can also act as a shield against the inevitable charges of extremism. When the Washington Post attacked McDonnell over his Regent University master’s thesis, in which he argued in support of the traditional family, McDonnell was able to respond by saying the focus of his campaign was on job creation. Cuccinelli did not develop such a shield or a broad-based, issue-oriented appeal to swing voters, which made him more vulnerable to the onslaught of negative ads accusing him (unjustly) of being out of the mainstream.

    Still, Cuccinelli ran a good race despite being heavily outspent. He is a man of principle and an outstanding public servant. Ironically given the way his opponent sought to define him, he is known in Richmond as a reasonable and pragmatic legislator and leader who works easily with those on the other side of the aisle. He ran on issues that resonated with Virginians, and took an early and courageous stand against Obamacare (in which he has been vindicated). As a result, a race that looked over turned out in the end to be a squeaker because he never wavered in the onslaught of attacks that sought to define him. He can hold his head high for having fought the good fight, and so should his many friends and supporters.

    — Ralph Reed is president of the Faith and Freedom Coalition.

    So, what are the lessons that we need to learn?

    1. After the primary, close ranks against the common enemy. The intra-party fighting does nobody any good except the Democrats. If you are an establishment type, you need to support the candidate, even if he wouldn't fit in at a Georgetown cocktail party. If you're a Tea Partyer, you can't let your disdain for a RINO cost the party a critical position. There are no noble defeats in politics, just defeats.
    2. Money is the lifeblood of campaigns. Terry McAuliffe is a lousy businessman and he will be a lousy governor, but he is an extremely efficient fundraiser, and he needed to be countered. McAuliffe used his fundraising advantage to define Cuccinelli as an extremist who hated women, while Cuccinelli failed to answer the attacks and respond in kind. Given McAuliffe's autobiographical incident in which he left his wife and newborn son sitting in a car on the way home from the hospital so that he could stop at a DNC fundraiser, this is especially dumb. An ad with a voice over reading from McAuliffe's autobiography, followed by the announcer asking, "If that's how Terry McAuliffe treats the most important woman in his life, how do you think he'll treat you?" would have been devastating. It wasn't done, and it was common knowledge prior to the campaign, as it was all over talk radio. It needed to be on TV.
    3. Cuccinelli risked a lot by remaining on the job. In other states, it wouldn't have been a problem, but the moment that the McDonnell gift scandal hit, Cuccinelli should have loudly and publicly recused himself at the very least and allowed his staff to run with the ball. The scandal hurt him by association, even though he was clean, which is doubly ironic when you consider how corrupt McAuliffe is. Next time, commit to the job that you're running for, not the one that you will be leaving.
    4. This one is partly a reflection of the second point, which is that Cuccinelli failed to define himself, and left it to McAuliffe to do so. When Cucinelli was ahead in the polls, last summer, he should have been using that time to introduce himself to the voters and to define McAuliffe as the sleaze that he is. Low information voters don't know that McAuliffe was Clinton's money man, or that he was responsible for a slew of scandals in almost every position that he's ever held.


    •Invested $100 and made millions in real estate (The Labor Department sued Jack Moore and John Grau in May of 1999 for mismanaging the pension fund for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. The pension fund put up $39 million to purchase the property in central Florida. McAuliffe only put up $100 but somehow made a $2.45 million profit. Despite investing only that $100, he and his wife ended up owning 50 percent of the project.)
    •Teamsters money-cycling scheme (McAuliffe, then finance director for the Democratic National Committee (DNC), “took an active part” in a plan to illegally solicit contributions for the campaign of Ron Carey for president of the Teamsters union in exchange for the union’s financial backing during the 1996 elections.)
    •Buddhist temple fundraiser (and, of course, Gore's phone calls from his government office, which violated the Hatch Act)
    •Sold face-time with the Clintons
    •Rented the Lincoln bedroom
    •Made $18 million on a failed fiber-optics company
    Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2013/11/captain-o...VGfovK5qFVR.99
    Even the lefties at Mother Jones were shocked that he was going to be the governor of a major state (http://www.motherjones.com/politics/...nor-virginia):
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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  3. #63  
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    I wouldn't expect Ralph Reed to say that Cuccinelli lost critical votes because he and/or his running mate made stupid remarks about gay people and women. But hopefully Reed's pointing out that the last governor grossly outspent the Democratic challenger will take some of the tar and BS out of those who act like McAsshole outspending Cooch was some kind of international communist conspiracy.

    And we all know that if it had rained and the Dems came up 3 points short, you would have proclaimed a MANDATE! on the part of the GOPTP and guys from Joisey who want to be Southern governors.
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  4. #64  
    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Don't be cross, Nova. Reed is just trying not to look like others that are pissed off because the so-called Establishment Republicans have the gall to fight back.

    You have to admit that after excoriating the "RINO's" for so long, it is a bit churlish to say, "We hate you! Give us money!"
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  5. #65  
    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Molon Labe View Post
    I'm not the one claiming the narrow view of "the poor". Nor am I making the simpleton claim that an election turns on Cuccinelli's view on gay butt sex.
    What's his view on straight butt sex?
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  6. #66  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    What's his view on straight butt sex?
    My guess would be that his view is of the pillow.
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  7. #67  
    Senior Member txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    Don't be cross, Nova. Reed is just trying not to look like others that are pissed off because the so-called Establishment Republicans have the gall to fight back.

    You have to admit that after excoriating the "RINO's" for so long, it is a bit churlish to say, "We hate you! Give us money!"
    What in the hell are you basing your crazy theory on that it's the "establishment fighting back"? Other than your hatred of the TEA party that you and Nova share.
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

    Liberalism Is The Philosophy Of The Stupid

    To Achieve Ordered Liberty You Must Have Moral Order As Well

    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  8. #68  
    Senior Member txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    My guess would be that his view is of the pillow.
    Something you're an expert on.
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

    Liberalism Is The Philosophy Of The Stupid

    To Achieve Ordered Liberty You Must Have Moral Order As Well

    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  9. #69  
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    Quote Originally Posted by txradioguy View Post
    Something you're an expert on.
    I'm sure that your $100 gets you what you want in Juarez, so I won't worry about you.
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  10. #70  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I wouldn't expect Ralph Reed to say that Cuccinelli lost critical votes because he and/or his running mate made stupid remarks about gay people and women. But hopefully Reed's pointing out that the last governor grossly outspent the Democratic challenger will take some of the tar and BS out of those who act like McAsshole outspending Cooch was some kind of international communist conspiracy.

    And we all know that if it had rained and the Dems came up 3 points short, you would have proclaimed a MANDATE! on the part of the GOPTP and guys from Joisey who want to be Southern governors.
    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Interesting article from National Review on the election. Nova will object to Ralph Reed being the author, but the analysis rings true to me, especially the McAuliffe spending spree.
    Some people are just so predictable. All of that analysis, and the only thing that you came away with was Ralph Reed and McAuliffe's war on women meme.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    Don't be cross, Nova. Reed is just trying not to look like others that are pissed off because the so-called Establishment Republicans have the gall to fight back.

    You have to admit that after excoriating the "RINO's" for so long, it is a bit churlish to say, "We hate you! Give us money!"
    You've got it backwards. Establishment Republicans have been the ones who have withheld support whenever they didn't get their way. The Tea Partiers are a backlash against that, but regardless, my point was that both sides have to make the best case that they can in the primary, and then support the winner in the general election. Otherwise, we end up with the likes of McAuliffe, in which case nobody wins except the kleptocrats.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    What's his view on straight butt sex?
    While in Athens, a tourist named Joan
    Was heard to remark with a groan
    "While sex is just fine,
    When I'm lying supine,
    It's a pain in the ass when I'm prone."
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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