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  1. #11  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    Amazing, when the Jewish people as a whole have always (at least in St Louis) been supporters of better treatment of the blacks.

    Big brave gang--15 against one 12 year old. I wonder what the Rev Al will do to stop this but have a feeling we'll be waiting a long time.
    When the white flight occurred in Detroit during the late 60s and early 70s, the Jews were among the last white people to leave. They just slowly moved north-first to the northwest side of the city, then to Oak Park, and now to Birmingham and Bloomfield Hills.

    There are some cool buildings that are now churches that used to be temples, though, and some of the churches kept the original decorations. There's one that has cool, Star of David stained glass windows on the corner of Evergreen and 7 Mile Rd.
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    When the white flight occurred in Detroit during the late 60s and early 70s, the Jews were among the last white people to leave. They just slowly moved north-first to the northwest side of the city, then to Oak Park, and now to Birmingham and Bloomfield Hills.

    There are some cool buildings that are now churches that used to be temples, though, and some of the churches kept the original decorations. There's one that has cool, Star of David stained glass windows on the corner of Evergreen and 7 Mile Rd.
    What is this "8 mile" and "7 mile" stuff about? Where I come from we have "Sixty Foot Road" but we don't have "Fifty Foot Road" or "Seventy Foot Road."
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Madisonian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    What is this "8 mile" and "7 mile" stuff about? Where I come from we have "Sixty Foot Road" but we don't have "Fifty Foot Road" or "Seventy Foot Road."
    The Mile Road System in Metro Detroit and Southeast Michigan facilitates ease of navigation in the region. It was established as a way to delineate east–west roads through the Detroit area and the surrounding rural rim. The Mile Road system, and its most famous road, 8 Mile Road, came about largely as a result of the Land Ordinance of 1785, which established the basis for the Public Land Survey System in which land throughout the Northwest Territory was surveyed and divided into survey townships by reference to a baseline (east–west line) and meridian (north–south line). In Southeast Michigan, many roads would be developed parallel to the base line and the meridian, and many of the east–west roads would be incorporated into the Mile Road System.

    The Mile Road System extended easterly into Detroit, but is interrupted, because much of Detroit's early settlements and farms were based on early French land grants that were aligned northwest-to-southeast with frontage along the Detroit River and on later development along roads running into downtown Detroit in a star pattern, such as Woodward, Jefferson, Grand River, Gratiot, and Michigan Avenues, developed by Augustus Woodward in imitation of Washington, D.C.'s system. As Detroit grew, several Mile Roads were given new names within the city borders, while some roads incorporated as part of the Mile Road System have traditionally been known by their non-mile names. It is unclear if they ever bore mile numbers formally.

    The baseline used in the survey of Michigan lands runs along 8 Mile Road, which is approximately eight miles directly north of the junction of Woodward Avenue and Michigan Avenue in downtown Detroit. As a result, the direct east–west portion of Michigan Avenue, and M-153 (Ford Road) west of Wyoming Avenue, forms the "zero mile" baseline for this mile road system.

    The precise point of origin is located in Campus Martius Park, marked by a medallion[6] embedded in the stone walkway. It is situated in the western point of the diamond surrounding Woodward Fountain,[7] just in front of the Fountain Bistro.
    We also can't keep our freeways straight in the Detroit metro area either. Instead of just the I-75 or I-96 designations, we have the Reuther (I-696), Lodge (M-10), Chrysler (I-75), Fisher (I-75), Ford (I-94), Jeffries (I-96) and Rosa Parks (I-96 between the Fisher and Ford freeways) as well.
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  4. #14  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madisonian View Post
    We also can't keep our freeways straight in the Detroit metro area either. Instead of just the I-75 or I-96 designations, we have the Reuther (I-696), Lodge (M-10), Chrysler (I-75), Fisher (I-75), Ford (I-94), Jeffries (I-96) and Rosa Parks (I-96 between the Fisher and Ford freeways) as well.
    How did they leave out Martin Luther? We have like Martin Luther ave, intersecting with Martin Luther street next too Martin Luther Parkway.
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
    http://i.imgur.com/FHvkMSE.jpg
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  5. #15  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    That's cold.
    Yes, but it had to be said. He's denying the obvious. See below.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    It sounds like he tries to see the good in people. It's actually a quality I like in Jewish communities I've been around. That said, I think it's time some of the progressives (not just Jewish ones, but all of them) woke up to some real problems.
    It's not so much that he is trying to see the good in people, he is denying the reality around him because it isn't in line with his pollyannaish view of the world. During the Holocaust, there were far too many Jews who refused to believe what was happening to them until it was too late. They believed the relocation stories, even after survivors escaped and publicized the atrocities in the camps. Jews in America, most notably the owners of the NY Times, refused to cover the stories, because they didn't want to draw attention to themselves and rock their comfortable boat. Far too many of us were willing to believe the lies that the Nazis told them, and many who knew that they were lies remained silent. Today, there are Jews who openly side with the enemies of the Jewish people, mostly on the left. Noam Chomsky, for example, or the clowns at J-Street, who seek to empower antisemitic Muslim regimes. Rabbi Cohen is, at best, a sucker, who thinks that by denying the reality around him he can keep it from being real.
    --Odysseus
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    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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  6. #16  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    How did they leave out Martin Luther? We have like Martin Luther ave, intersecting with Martin Luther street next too Martin Luther Parkway.
    We have an MLK Boulevard about a mile north of downtown. On the east side, it's Mack AVE, on the west, it's MLK BLVD. My dad still calls it Myrtle.

    We have a Rosa Parks BLVD, also, in addition to a freeway stretch named for her. My dad still calls that street 12th, but these two are mostly called by their new names at this point in time.

    I think Linwood has a second name, I believe it's Rev. CL Franklin BLVD (Aretha's daddy), but everyone still calls it Linwood.
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  7. #17  
    Politically tired. Lanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Yes, but it had to be said. He's denying the obvious. See below.


    It's not so much that he is trying to see the good in people, he is denying the reality around him because it isn't in line with his pollyannaish view of the world. During the Holocaust, there were far too many Jews who refused to believe what was happening to them until it was too late. They believed the relocation stories, even after survivors escaped and publicized the atrocities in the camps. Jews in America, most notably the owners of the NY Times, refused to cover the stories, because they didn't want to draw attention to themselves and rock their comfortable boat. Far too many of us were willing to believe the lies that the Nazis told them, and many who knew that they were lies remained silent. Today, there are Jews who openly side with the enemies of the Jewish people, mostly on the left. Noam Chomsky, for example, or the clowns at J-Street, who seek to empower antisemitic Muslim regimes. Rabbi Cohen is, at best, a sucker, who thinks that by denying the reality around him he can keep it from being real.
    I'd go with sucker. I doubt he's a Chomsky.
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  8. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Yes, but it had to be said. He's denying the obvious. See below.


    It's not so much that he is trying to see the good in people, he is denying the reality around him because it isn't in line with his pollyannaish view of the world. During the Holocaust, there were far too many Jews who refused to believe what was happening to them until it was too late... Rabbi Cohen is, at best, a sucker, who thinks that by denying the reality around him he can keep it from being real.
    There may be more to it than that:


    Poll: Jews in Europe Do Not Report Anti-Semitic Events
    http://freebeacon.com/poll-jews-in-e...emitic-events/

    A new poll reveals that Jews in Europe seem unwilling to report “isolated, personally directed anti-Semitic events to authorities, Israel Hayom reports.

    Some 82 percent of those surveyed who reported having felt discriminated against because they were Jews said this was the first time they were telling anyone about it.

    The poll indicated that the Internet remains a forum for anonymous individuals to espouse anti-Semitism. Seventy-five percent of those polled said anti-Semitism on the Internet in their home countries was problematic. Among children and adults between the ages of 16 and 29, 16% reported having been subject to offensive replies on Internet forums.

    Off the Internet, 25% of those polled reported having experienced verbally abusive language or harassment because they were Jews. Additionally, nearly one in five respondents said they had been physically attacked apparently because of their Jewish identity.

    The study was only conducted in European Union countries.

    Sixty-six percent of those polled claimed anti-Semitism was a problem that existed in every EU country; 75% said anti-Semitism has become worse over the last five years; almost half of respondents said they were afraid they would be verbally abused for being Jewish in the next 12 month; and a third of all respondents said they feared being physically assaulted.
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  9. #19  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    There may be more to it than that:


    Poll: Jews in Europe Do Not Report Anti-Semitic Events
    http://freebeacon.com/poll-jews-in-e...emitic-events/

    A new poll reveals that Jews in Europe seem unwilling to report “isolated, personally directed anti-Semitic events to authorities, Israel Hayom reports.

    Some 82 percent of those surveyed who reported having felt discriminated against because they were Jews said this was the first time they were telling anyone about it.

    The poll indicated that the Internet remains a forum for anonymous individuals to espouse anti-Semitism. Seventy-five percent of those polled said anti-Semitism on the Internet in their home countries was problematic. Among children and adults between the ages of 16 and 29, 16% reported having been subject to offensive replies on Internet forums.

    Off the Internet, 25% of those polled reported having experienced verbally abusive language or harassment because they were Jews. Additionally, nearly one in five respondents said they had been physically attacked apparently because of their Jewish identity.

    The study was only conducted in European Union countries.

    Sixty-six percent of those polled claimed anti-Semitism was a problem that existed in every EU country; 75% said anti-Semitism has become worse over the last five years; almost half of respondents said they were afraid they would be verbally abused for being Jewish in the next 12 month; and a third of all respondents said they feared being physically assaulted.
    And that was after we banned Gator.

    Europe has a far worse history of antisemitism than the US, because the US learned from the example of religious violence in Europe and barred the use of religious tests and state-run churches. What's really interesting, though, is that many of the most secular countries have the worst record of abuses in the last couple of centuries. The French pretty much banished religion from the public sphere since the revolution, to the point where they no longer even had chaplains in their army, but that didn't stop them from scapegoating Dreyfus, and French antisemitism is legendary in Europe. Even the Vichy government, which didn't have to turn over Jews, did so with enthusiasm. The Norwegians actively collaborated with the Nazis and turned over Jews en masse. The communist states were vicious in their persecutions of Jews and other religious groups, and Stalin's last planned purge of Jews was only aborted by his death. The British were extremely antisemitic, despite the fact that Jews in the Palestine mandate were enthusiastic fighters for king and country, while the Arabs were constantly trying to undermine the British and work with the Nazis. Today, these countries actively court Muslims and the result is the marginalization of Jews and the constant threat of violence. Am I surprised that Jews in Europe are afraid of speaking out? No. The great-granchildren of the WWII generation that openly celebrated the Holocaust is no better than their forebears, and the surviving Jews know this.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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  10. #20  
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    So you think Jews that are being attacked feel that they have no backup from the younger generation?

    This is really upsetting. I have been reading for a long time that the Muslim influx in Europe has exacerbated the attacks on European Jews, but I didn't realize there was a feeling of not being able to report the attacks to the government.
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