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  1. #1 Cheating students more likely to want government jobs 
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    By Emily Alpert Reyes

    LA TIMES SCIENCE



    College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania found in a study of hundreds of students in Bangalore, India.


    Their results, recently released as a working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggest that one of the contributing forces behind government corruption could be who gets into government work in the first place.

    For instance, “if people have the view that jobs in government are corrupt, people who are honest might not want to get into that system,” said Rema Hanna, an associate professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. To combat that problem, governments may need to find new ways to screen people seeking jobs, she said.

    Researchers ran a series of experiments with more than 600 students finishing up college in India. In one task, students had to privately roll a die and report what number they got. The higher the number, the more they would get paid. Each student rolled the die 42 times.
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  2. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    By Emily Alpert Reyes

    LA TIMES SCIENCE



    College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania found in a study of hundreds of students in Bangalore, India.


    Their results, recently released as a working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggest that one of the contributing forces behind government corruption could be who gets into government work in the first place.

    For instance, “if people have the view that jobs in government are corrupt, people who are honest might not want to get into that system,” said Rema Hanna, an associate professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. To combat that problem, governments may need to find new ways to screen people seeking jobs, she said.

    Researchers ran a series of experiments with more than 600 students finishing up college in India. In one task, students had to privately roll a die and report what number they got. The higher the number, the more they would get paid. Each student rolled the die 42 times.
    Using the demographics of American federal employment we could make all kinds of propensity conclusions because the same is not representative here either. It seems to me that the real problem is when government jobs become the better or best jobs in an area. In American this is not because government jobs are corrupt or wildly compensated, it's because the private sector has been allowed to export jobs which Americans once did well and for which were well compensated.
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  3. #3  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    One of my ex-coworkers cheated her way through life, until she got the wrong supervisor.


    Sooner or later, cheaters get caught if they don't change their ways. Even those who work for the government. I warned my ex-coworker-I told her "they always get you on the mileage". If you are cheating to cover your ass, you won't go the extra mile to get money for it. If you are cheating as a way of life, you are also putting in for mileage for those visits you never made. They catch you when you get greedy.

    She is no longer employed by the state.
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  4. #4  
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    "More likely to want" does not mean "more likely to have." A cheating student might feel that a government job is "easy" and that they're less likely to be fired, hence their desire. But government jobs (especially Federal ones) are surprisingly hard to get, especially the higher GS/SES levels. You have to know your stuff. In my experience, the government workers often know more than the contractors who are brought in to do the work.
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  5. #5  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Using the demographics of American federal employment we could make all kinds of propensity conclusions because the same is not representative here either. It seems to me that the real problem is when government jobs become the better or best jobs in an area. In American this is not because government jobs are corrupt or wildly compensated, it's because the private sector has been allowed to export jobs which Americans once did well and for which were well compensated.
    The private sector wasn't "allowed" to export jobs. Unions have imposed increasingly unsustainable costs on businesses, and the expansion of government has imposed huge regulatory and financial burdens on the private sector, which made hiring domestically more complicated, expensive and burdensome. Outsourcing comes with its own costs, which are the results of trying to run a business from a great distance. Inefficiencies abound, and the start up costs can be prohibitive, but when the domestic job market becomes so convoluted and expensive that it becomes too difficult to expand or even maintain domestic operations, outsourcing becomes cost-effective. Do you really believe that most corporations would want to deal with the costs and hassle of overseas subsidiaries if they could get work done close to home?
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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  6. #6  
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    The OP describes a study in India.

    Conditions may be very different there from here.
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