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  1. #1 Poll: Israelis don't believe Iran will stop nuclear program 
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    http://www.israelhayom.com/site/news...e.php?id=13561

    A majority of the Jewish Israeli public does not believe that Iran will stop its nuclear program following the agreement it signed with the P5+1 over the weekend, an Israel Hayom poll finds.



    A majority of the Hebrew-speaking Jewish Israeli public does not believe that Iran will stop its nuclear program following the agreement it signed with the P5+1 over the weekend, an Israel Hayom poll has found.

    According to the poll, commissioned by Israel Hayom from the New Wave Research Institute, 76.4% of respondents said they did not believe Iran would halt its nuclear program, while only 12.6% said they did believe Iran would put a stop to its program. Eleven percent said they did not know.

    The poll also found that 57.8% of Jewish Israelis believe that the U.S. harmed Israeli interests by signing the nuclear deal with Iran. Only 20.6% said that the U.S. did not harm Israeli interests by signing the deal, while 21.6% said they did not know.

    Asked if, should Iran continue to pursue its nuclear program, they would be for or against an independent Israeli military strike on Iran, 45.8% of respondents said they would be in favor of such a strike, while 37.9% said they were against, and 16.3% said they did not know.

    Asked if they were satisfied with the performance of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu over the nuclear deal, 55.3% of respondents said they were satisfied, 31% said they were not satisfied, and 13.7% said they did not know.

    The poll was conducted on Sunday, Nov. 24, from a random sample of 500 people representing the Hebrew-speaking Jewish population aged 18 and above. The survey has a 4.4% margin of error.
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  2. #2  
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    And Hayden doesn't like the deal either:


    Hayden: Worst of all possible outcomes

    http://www.politico.com/blogs/politi...es-178241.html

    Former CIA Director Michael Hayden says his biggest concern in the outcome from the nuclear deal with Iran is what happens after the six months are over.

    “My great fear is that this interim agreement, which doesn’t role back much at all, becomes a permanent agreement,” said Sunday on CNN's “State of the Union.”

    “Practically the worst of all possible outcomes is what you have here, a nuclear-capable state” he said. “Frankly, that’s what is Iran’s bottom line."

    Negotiations, he said, are now just time between nuclear capability and a nuclear weapon.
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  3. #3  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    The average Iranian citizen wants to have trade re-established with the west. To avoid another uprising like in 2009, the government is responding-who knows, the next uprising could be successful if their economy continues to stumble and the people figure out that having the ability to wipe Israel off the face of the earth has a price tag paid in dead Iranian people.


    I'm all for talks and peaceful agreements. I don't want to see Israel launch a military strike against Iran and I don't want to see the US get involved in a war with Iran.

    But I also can see how Bibi feels he is being set up to be the bad guy. If the US has an agreement with Iran that doesn't involve Israel, then if Israel strikes Iran, the whole world will then be in opposition to Israel's actions.

    Personally, I think Obama could have found a better SOS than Kerry. I would have even supported a republican for that cabinet position over Kerry. Not a senile one like McCain, but maybe a conservative like Mike Rogers-I might not agree with him on social issues, but I think he has a good understanding of international diplomacy.
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    The average Iranian citizen wants to have trade re-established with the west. To avoid another uprising like in 2009, the government is responding-who knows, the next uprising could be successful if their economy continues to stumble and the people figure out that having the ability to wipe Israel off the face of the earth has a price tag paid in dead Iranian people.


    I'm all for talks and peaceful agreements. I don't want to see Israel launch a military strike against Iran and I don't want to see the US get involved in a war with Iran.

    But I also can see how Bibi feels he is being set up to be the bad guy. If the US has an agreement with Iran that doesn't involve Israel, then if Israel strikes Iran, the whole world will then be in opposition to Israel's actions.

    Personally, I think Obama could have found a better SOS than Kerry. I would have even supported a republican for that cabinet position over Kerry. Not a senile one like McCain, but maybe a conservative like Mike Rogers-I might not agree with him on social issues, but I think he has a good understanding of international diplomacy.
    Agree with you Noonie on someone else being better than Kerry. But I doubt if any individual holding the position of SOS would make a difference. I think any SOS is the mouthpiece for Obama and whoever is pulling his strings. It probably makes no difference. I doubt if Obama and his close allies listen to anyone but themselves,
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  5. #5  
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    NOrmally I defer to Israel on such matters. I wonder, though, if we can truly predict the future from the past when it comes to Iran. To do so would require that we ignore the changes in technology and society which have come about since the 1970's. Those of us who lived in DC at the time met the upper middle class and upper class of Persian society. They were everywhere and by and large were somewhat like us.

    My observation is that Islam, radical islam thrives on ignorance and poverty. The Persian people aren't known for their satisfaction at being either ignorant or poor.

    Trade and technology can reasonably be expected to make Islamic fundamentalism more and more difficult to manifest. I read that India is champing at the bit to trade with Iran. Basically, money is crack. If we can get the Persian people addicted to money and consumerism, won't it be almost impossible for imams to turn them back?
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