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  1. #111  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post

    So how many years of medical school did the chicken farmers need?

    Sorry but I have lived on farms, worked on farms and have even owned a farm. Independent farmers still do pretty good.
    People who change with the times do better on average than those who don't.
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  2. #112  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    How do you figure that the government is or would be managing all medical practices?

    Ed Haislmaier, a health care researcher at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, DC, said Obamacare will accelerate the decline in doctor-owned private practices because more doctors will only accept patients who can pay in cash, leading to fewer clients and fewer private practices.

    “I think we are going to see primary care doctors increasingly moving to a cash-only arrangement, where they opt out of insurance rules,” Haislmaier said. “Primary care specialists, those on salary, will increase versus those who are in effect independent contractors, assuming these reforms actually happen and are not altered or repealed.”

    The new reforms also require the inpatient admissions of physician-owned hospitals to match or exceed the average admissions in all other county hospitals, have a bed occupancy rate greater than the state average, and be located in states where bed capacity is below the national average.

    “Clinical practice doctors are moving toward positions of those in research and management—all those same divisions—so you will see some shift to those things,” said Haislmaier. “Make no mistake, some doctors who are in private practice are going to start to do something else or go somewhere else if Obamacare is not altered.”

    <snip>

    Diana Furchtgott-Roth, a health policy analyst at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC, says these requirements will further reduce the number of doctor-owned medical practices in the country and encourage doctor unionization.

    “They have set up the system to fail, and to eliminate entrepeneurial approaches to medicine,” Furchtgott-Roth said. “Step one is to get more and more people into the Medicaid program, and private practice doctors do not want to take Medicaid. So federal or state governments are going to have to hire many doctors to cope with all the new demand, and those doctors are going to be unionized.”

    <snip>

    “The long-term goal of many of the people who have imposed Obamacare is to put the provider side of health care in the public sector,” Graham said. “It is putting medical providers in hospitals, nursing homes, and other areas under government control, and having them deliver their service according to a very centralized system. That system will probably demand a high level of unionization or quasi-unionization and drive out private practice.”

    http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-...wned-practices
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  3. #113  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    It's my understanding that the law treats pets as property and liability is limited to the replacement cost of the pet.

    How much do you think doctors pay in malpractice insurance?

    I used the highest figure in this article. $20,000/yr. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-...b_4171189.html

    http://truecostofhealthcare.org/malpractice

    20000/48 weeks/5 days / 16 patients = $5.20 per patient visit

    In reality a doctor would probably see more than 16 customers per day so the cost per customer would be lower. Obviously, if a doctor sees 32 patients a day the cost would be half. It's not unreasonable that a GP with an adult client base would see 32 patients per day.

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/12/...afely-day.html
    And so your vet pays little or nothing. And any supplies cost a fraction of the same thing for your md as standards of risk are absent. About the only comprable cost is real estate. No nurses, techs need have no training or certification at all. And education is far less. Comparing vets to docs isapples to refrigerators.
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  4. #114  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    It's my understanding that the law treats pets as property and liability is limited to the replacement cost of the pet.

    How much do you think doctors pay in malpractice insurance?

    I used the highest figure in this article. $20,000/yr. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-...b_4171189.html

    http://truecostofhealthcare.org/malpractice

    20000/48 weeks/5 days / 16 patients = $5.20 per patient visit

    In reality a doctor would probably see more than 16 customers per day so the cost per customer would be lower. Obviously, if a doctor sees 32 patients a day the cost would be half. It's not unreasonable that a GP with an adult client base would see 32 patients per day.

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/12/...afely-day.html
    $5.20 a patient is a lot of money if Medicaid only reimburses you $24 per office visit.

    Malpractice premiums vary from state to state, states with tort reform usually have lower rates.

    From 2009:

    In 2009, one of the highest rates of insurance in Nevada is for OB/GYNs, who may pay between $85,000 for malpractice liability insurance per year up to $142,000 per year for a premium plan by a prominent insurance company. Although the average annual salary for such doctors was around $180,000 in 2009, malpractice insurance can still be a huge financial burden.
    Read more: http://www.ehow.com/about_5514154_av...#ixzz2qOtk9iNq


    If the premium was a low of 85k four years ago, I'm sure it's higher now.
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  5. #115  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    People who change with the times do better on average than those who don't.
    Doctors are able to take their education and find a new job. They are changing with the times, they are getting out of medicine.
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  6. #116  
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    FL is one of the worst for malpractice insurance:

    Florida has some of the highest rates of liability insurance. Moreover, the deviation between low and high averages varies in Florida more widely than in almost any other state. For instance, a doctor in internal medicine in Florida could expect to pay in excess of $56,000 per year for insurance as of 2009, in contrast with Minnesota's $4,000. General surgeons paid in between $90,000 per year and $175,000 per year or more. OB/GYNs once again could expect the highest rates, with liability coverage ranging from $100,000 to $200,000 per year.
    Read more: http://www.ehow.com/about_5514154_av...#ixzz2qOzqa9bs
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  7. #117  
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    Quote Originally Posted by coach View Post
    Comparing vets to docs isapples to refrigerators.
    It's better then his attempt to compare doctors to chicken farmers.
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  8. #118  
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    Quote Originally Posted by coach View Post
    No nurses, techs need have no training or certification at all. And education is far less. Comparing vets to docs isapples to refrigerators.
    Vet techs are trained and certified. They aren't equal to people RN's but most of the "nurses" in doctor's offices in my experience are cna or lpn. In the ppu at my hospital there is one rn to two or three "techs".

    DVM education time, demands, and costs are comparable to an MD.

    http://iwanttobeaveterinarian.org/si...naryschool.pml

    http://gradschool.about.com/od/medic...SchoolCost.htm
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  9. #119  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    It's better then his attempt to compare doctors to chicken farmers.
    Next time I'll take your iq into account.
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  10. #120  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Next time I'll take your iq into account.
    You might have a better chance if you stayed on the chicken farm.
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