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  1. #1 Horror Novel List, Week 2 -- Haunted Houses! 
    Senior Member DarkScribe's Avatar
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    For the Week Two topic of the Horror Novel List, I've decided to use the classic setting of any great horror story...the haunted house. The long-standing creepy, dilapidated, cobweb-strewn, ghost-inhabited, soul-shattering manse has been a staple in classic AND modern horror fiction. So, I hope you enjoy this list and please add some of your own. Fictional stories (short OR long) can also include tales of hauntings, ghosts, demons, and ghouls...but these ALL must take place in one way or another in an old house, hotel, school, etc. Hear those boards creak upstairs? The wind howling around decrepit old eaves, sounding so much like the tortured scream of damned souls? The door suddenly opening behind you and you spin around to see...nothing!

    #1 The Shining by Stephen King. Yes, yes, I know the setting isn't a HOUSE but a very large resort hotel, but this is perhaps the finest "haunted house" modern horror novel (in my opinion). Tortured writer Jack Torrance decides to spend the winter as caretaker of the Overlook, along with his wife and young son, who possesses the ability (the Shine, as dubbed by the Overlook's Shine-gifted head chef, Dick Halloran) to see violent and bloody events that took place within its walls...ghosts of the past. But when the evil essence of the Overlook begins to taint Jack's mind, he soon sees his family as a threat to his real inheritance...not as a famous writer, but that as a permanent resident of the Overlook.

    #2 Ghost Story by Peter Straub. Perhaps the best horror novel written by the eloquent and resilient Straub, who's been writing horror for as long as his contemporary and friend from Maine. This dense but nicely-paced novel darts back and forth between two eras, the Then and Now, and involves a group of wealthy old men who gather to drink brandy, smoke cigars, and tell ghost stories--the Chowder Society--and a high school teacher trying to solve the mystery of his older brother's bizarre suicide. The members of the Chowder Society think that one heinous act in their past--that of the tragic death of one beautiful woman they ALL longed for--was buried forever. But unsettled, perhaps evil, things don't stay buried, for long...

    #3 The "Harrow House" novels by Douglas Clegg. Although unknown to many of you, maybe, Clegg has been long contributing great novels and stories to the modern horror pantheon. In several novels, Clegg has created a terrifying history surrounding a dark mansion in upstate New York, a house called Harrow. Do yourself a favor and order these novels. They are well-worth the money. Nightmare House, Mischief, The Infinite, and The Abandoned all take place at Harrow, but at different time periods. Also, his novella, Necromancer, is kind of a prequel to Nightmare House, which is the first Harrow novel.

    #4 The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons. (This was suggestion from Shannon, by the way) This southern gothic classic takes place in Atlanta, where an architectural feat of a house is constructed, only to take away from the newly arrived family what they most hold dear. The neighbors next door, Colquitt and Walter Kennedy, try to make sense of the all-pervasive evil that seems to destroy all who inhabit the seemingly perfect, beautiful structure...but it is they who must take it upon themselves to confront this monstrous force...even if that feat seems nearly impossible.

    #5 Flesh Gothic by Edward Lee. Okay, I couldn't help myself...but this is a classic haunted house tale, Ed Lee-style! Kind of like The Haunting of Hill House meets Hustler magazine...sort of. But seriously, Lee takes the haunted house motif and injects his own hardcore brand of the macabre. Not for the squeamish or faint of heart. And you can't help but think nothing good can ever happen in a place called Hildreth House...

    As a side-note, I left out Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House because it was listed in Week One, but it would otherwise be noted here. Also, Richard Matheson's Hell House is supposedly a fantastic haunted house novel, which I own but haven't read yet.
    Last edited by DarkScribe; 10-06-2008 at 07:33 PM.
    "The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." H.P. Lovecraft in Supernatural Horror in Literature
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  2. #2  
    Resident Unliked Meanie Shannon's Avatar
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    Flesh Gothic is a porn book. I don't care if ghosts are involved. It's still just porn.
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    #2 Ghost Story by Peter Straub. Perhaps the best horror novel written by the eloquent and resilient Straub, who's been writing horror for as long as his contemporary and friend from Maine. This dense but nicely-paced novel darts back and forth between two eras, the Then and Now, and involves a group of wealthy old men who gather to drink brandy, smoke cigars, and tell ghost stories--the Chowder Society--and a high school teacher trying to solve the mystery of his older brother's bizarre suicide. The members of the Chowder Society think that one heinous act in their past--that of the tragic death of one beautiful woman they ALL longed for--was buried forever. But unsettled, perhaps evil, things don't stay buried, for long...
    I saw this movie. Freaky.
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    Resident Unliked Meanie Shannon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jinxmchue View Post
    I saw this movie. Freaky.
    The movie was lame compared to the book.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkScribe View Post
    For the Week Two topic of the Horror Novel List, I've decided to use the classic setting of any great horror story...the haunted house. The long-standing creepy, dilapidated, cobweb-strewn, ghost-inhabited, soul-shattering manse has been a staple in classic AND modern horror fiction. So, I hope you enjoy this list and please add some of your own. Fictional stories (short OR long) can also include tales of hauntings, ghosts, demons, and ghouls...but these ALL must take place in one way or another in an old house, hotel, school, etc. Hear those boards creak upstairs? The wind howling around decrepit old eaves, sounding so much like the tortured scream of damned souls? The door suddenly opening behind you and you spin around to see...nothing!

    #1 The Shining by Stephen King. Yes, yes, I know the setting isn't a HOUSE but a very large resort hotel, but this is perhaps the finest "haunted house" modern horror novel (in my opinion). Tortured writer Jack Torrance decides to spend the winter as caretaker of the Overlook, along with his wife and young son, who possesses the ability (the Shine, as dubbed by the Overlook's Shine-gifted head chef, Dick Halloran) to see violent and bloody events that took place within its walls...ghosts of the past. But when the evil essence of the Overlook begins to taint Jack's mind, he soon sees his family as a threat to his real inheritance...not as a famous writer, but that as a permanent resident of the Overlook.

    #2 Ghost Story by Peter Straub. Perhaps the best horror novel written by the eloquent and resilient Straub, who's been writing horror for as long as his contemporary and friend from Maine. This dense but nicely-paced novel darts back and forth between two eras, the Then and Now, and involves a group of wealthy old men who gather to drink brandy, smoke cigars, and tell ghost stories--the Chowder Society--and a high school teacher trying to solve the mystery of his older brother's bizarre suicide. The members of the Chowder Society think that one heinous act in their past--that of the tragic death of one beautiful woman they ALL longed for--was buried forever. But unsettled, perhaps evil, things don't stay buried, for long...

    #3 The "Harrow House" novels by Douglas Clegg. Although unknown to many of you, maybe, Clegg has been long contributing great novels and stories to the modern horror pantheon. In several novels, Clegg has created a terrifying history surrounding a dark mansion in upstate New York, a house called Harrow. Do yourself a favor and order these novels. They are well-worth the money. Nightmare House, Mischief, The Infinite, and The Abandoned all take place at Harrow, but at different time periods. Also, his novella, Necromancer, is kind of a prequel to Nightmare House, which is the first Harrow novel.

    #4 The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons. (This was suggestion from Shannon, by the way) This southern gothic classic takes place in Atlanta, where an architectural feat of a house is constructed, only to take away from the newly arrived family what they most hold dear. The neighbors next door, Colquitt and Walter Kennedy, try to make sense of the all-pervasive evil that seems to destroy all who inhabit the seemingly perfect, beautiful structure...but it is they who must take it upon themselves to confront this monstrous force...even if that feat seems nearly impossible.

    #5 Flesh Gothic by Edward Lee. Okay, I couldn't help myself...but this is a classic haunted house tale, Ed Lee-style! Kind of like The Haunting of Hill House meets Hustler magazine...sort of. But seriously, Lee takes the haunted house motif and injects his own hardcore brand of the macabre. Not for the squeamish or faint of heart. And you can't help but think nothing good can ever happen in a place called Hildreth House...

    As a side-note, I left out Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House because it was listed in Week One, but it would otherwise be noted here. Also, Richard Matheson's Hell House is supposedly a fantastic haunted house novel, which I own but haven't read yet.
    Good list, I have been looking for something to read in the horror genre .thank you .
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    Good titles. I like a short story by H.P. Lovecraft called The Lurking Fear.


    There was thunder in the air on the night I went to the deserted mansion atop Tempest Mountain to find the lurking fear. I was not alone, for foolhardiness was not then mixed with that love of the grotesque and the terrible which has made my career a series of quests for strange horrors in literature and in life. With me were two faithful and muscular men for whom I had sent when the time came; men long associated with me in my ghastly explorations because of their peculiar fitness.

    We had started quietly from the village because of the reporters who still lingered about after the eldritch panic of a month before - the nightmare creeping death. Later, I thought, they might aid me; but I did not want them then. Would to God I had let them share the search, that I might not have had to bear the secret alone so long; to bear it alone for fear the world would call me mad or go mad itself at the demon implications of the thing. Now that I am telling it anyway, lest the brooding make me a maniac, I wish I had never concealed it. For I, and I only, know what manner of fear lurked on that spectral and desolate mountain.
    I love his style.
    Hey careful man! There's a beverage here!
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    Senior Member DarkScribe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shannon View Post
    Flesh Gothic is a porn book. I don't care if ghosts are involved. It's still just porn.
    And Mr. Lee would consider that HIGH praise! :p
    "The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." H.P. Lovecraft in Supernatural Horror in Literature
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member DarkScribe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba Dawg View Post
    Good titles. I like a short story by H.P. Lovecraft called The Lurking Fear.




    I love his style.
    Indeed. In a lot of ways--even though I discovered Poe first--the older I get the more I seem to appreciate what HPL brought to the genre. As they say..."he dah man!"
    "The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." H.P. Lovecraft in Supernatural Horror in Literature
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member DarkScribe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba Dawg View Post
    Good titles. I like a short story by H.P. Lovecraft called The Lurking Fear.




    I love his style.
    By the way, BD...check out the site:

    http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary...aft/index.html
    "The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." H.P. Lovecraft in Supernatural Horror in Literature
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  10. #10  
    Senior Betwixt Member Bubba Dawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkScribe View Post
    Indeed. In a lot of ways--even though I discovered Poe first--the older I get the more I seem to appreciate what HPL brought to the genre. As they say..."he dah man!"

    House of Usher comes to mind. I really like Poe.

    I had a raggedy paperback copy of HP Lovecraft for years. Finally wore it out or lost it. I really like him a lot.
    Hey careful man! There's a beverage here!
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