Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1 We Need To Stop Trusting The Police 
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sarasota,FL
    Posts
    42,797
    Yeah, you go right ahead there loon...



    Thu Jan 23, 2014, 03:48 AM
    MrScorpio

    We Need To Stop Trusting The Police

    Last Monday, a jury found two former Fullerton, California, police officers not guilty on one charge of excessive force, two of manslaughter, and one of second-degree murder in the beating death of Kelly Thomas. The 2011 altercation, which lead to Thomas’s death five days later, was captured in detail by surveillance cameras and audio from police recorders—on tape, the cops can be seen beating the homeless man mercilessly and Tasing him twice in the face. At one point, Thomas is moaning “Help me dad” as the officers swing their nightsticks at him.

    That fairly clear video evidence, along with the activism of Kelly’s father Ron (a former sheriff’s deputy) and the mobilization outraged community, ensured Thomas’s death got a lot more media coverage than the killing of homeless people by police normally do. But the officers are still walking free after beating an unarmed man to death. (In fact, one of them, Jay Cicinelli, already wants his job back.) How does that happen? A great many people in the community are asking that same question—multiple protests against the outcome of the trial this week resulted in 14 arrests

    One answer to that question is that the jurors, like most Americans, probably thought that cops are generally almost always right. A Gallup Poll from last month found that 54 percent of respondents had “high” or “very high” amounts of trust in police officers. People think more favorably of cops than they do journalists, politicians, lawyers, or even members of the clergy. The only authority figures more trusted than the police are doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and grade school teachers.

    That trust is buttressed by laws that grant cops various kinds of immunity against prosecution. For instance, in 2010, a Seattle cop named Ian Birk shot and killed John T. Williams, a Native American woodcarver, and after the dust settled, a review panel had found that the shooting was unjustified, Birk had resigned from the force, and the city had paid Williams’s family $1.5 million. Yet Birk never faced criminal charges for killing Williams, since under Washington state law prosecutors would have had to prove evidence of “malice or bad faith” on his part when he pulled the trigger.

    http://www.vice.com/read/we-need-to-...ing-the-police
    Let's put OWS in charge...
    May the FORCE be with you!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    12,445
    Quote Originally Posted by SarasotaRepub View Post
    Yeah, you go right ahead there loon...





    Let's put OWS in charge...

    That would be like the end of A Clockwork Orange, when Alex is released from prison after being brainwashed into pacifism, and gets the crap beat out of him by his former droogs, who have become cops while he was incarcerated.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,595
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    That would be like the end of A Clockwork Orange, when Alex is released from prison after being brainwashed into pacifism, and gets the crap beat out of him by his former droogs, who have become cops while he was incarcerated.
    "Jobs for them what are of job age, eh?"

    Yeah, I don't totally trust cops already, after my years prosecuting crimes, I've seen plenty of them lie, play games, and just make shit up while under oath. Although the great majority of them are basically honest and want to do the right thing, their idea of the 'Right thing' often involves fitting the actual facts into their personal stereotypes and preconceptions, getting submission to their authority whether they're right or wrong, and making whatever charge they write up stick. It's a big mistake to afford anyone unquestioned authority, no matter how good their intentions may be, it always ends badly. Without actual accountability and consequences for misconduct, you just open the door for the force itself to become a safe harbor for sociopathic behavior. Of course, 9 out of 10 of the people they end up having confrontations with are a whole lot worse, so defaulting to NOT believing them at all works out even worse.

    "Trust but verify."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Fabulous Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    10,161
    Quote Originally Posted by SarasotaRepub View Post
    Thomas’s death got a lot more media coverage than the killing of homeless people by police normally do…
    Ah yes, the journalistic style known as "No integrity." The problem with newspapers and radio is that they control the message. If the Times doesn't like your criticism, then they don't print your letter. If Michael Medved can't justify his position, then he baffles with bullshit, goes to commercial, or suddenly experiences trouble with the telephone connection. When someone says or prints "normally do" or "how many times must x happen" then the appropriate response is to demand to know how many examples we are talking about.

    We live in a world where journalism is going down the tubes. We live in a world where educated people believe that they have no obligation to be objective. Talk radio hosts can be forgiven; they are entertainers and if they get too professorial then people will stop listening. Todd Schnitt aggravates the crap out of me, but apparently appeals to people who have nothing better to do than to be teased for two hours to get ten minutes of content.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Fabulous Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    10,161
    For instance, in 2010, a Seattle cop named Ian Birk shot and killed John T. Williams, a Native American woodcarver, and after the dust settled, a review panel had found that the shooting was unjustified, Birk had resigned from the force, and the city had paid Williams’s family $1.5 million. Yet Birk never faced criminal charges for killing Williams, since under Washington state law prosecutors would have had to prove evidence of “malice or bad faith” on his part when he pulled the trigger.

    This is another tactic, and one which the right wing specializes in as well: dragging up an old and resolved case and re-reporting it as if it had not be resolved. In this case, John T Williams whom they never fail to mention was a "Native American" as if that has squat to do with anything, was a demented inebriate who came at the the police with a knife (which is why they always call him a woodcarver, I suspect he was a wood carver the same way the bums in New York are auto detailers). He had also recently been in prison for lewd exposure. They are trying this same tactic with Trayvon Martin. It's as if there had never been a trial and a finding of fact in the case.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ft Worth
    Posts
    3,788
    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Ah yes, the journalistic style known as "No integrity." The problem with newspapers and radio is that they control the message. If the Times doesn't like your criticism, then they don't print your letter. If Michael Medved can't justify his position, then he baffles with bullshit, goes to commercial, or suddenly experiences trouble with the telephone connection. When someone says or prints "normally do" or "how many times must x happen" then the appropriate response is to demand to know how many examples we are talking about.

    We live in a world where journalism is going down the tubes. We live in a world where educated people believe that they have no obligation to be objective. Talk radio hosts can be forgiven; they are entertainers and if they get too professorial then people will stop listening. Todd Schnitt aggravates the crap out of me, but apparently appeals to people who have nothing better to do than to be teased for two hours to get ten minutes of content.
    Because we have become a culture whose foundation is solipsism. We are told and we believe, consciously or unconsciously, that perception is reality. We are encouraged to eschew and reject objective reality.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    12,445
    Quote Originally Posted by DumbAss Tanker View Post
    "Jobs for them what are of job age, eh?"

    Yeah, I don't totally trust cops already, after my years prosecuting crimes, I've seen plenty of them lie, play games, and just make shit up while under oath. Although the great majority of them are basically honest and want to do the right thing, their idea of the 'Right thing' often involves fitting the actual facts into their personal stereotypes and preconceptions, getting submission to their authority whether they're right or wrong, and making whatever charge they write up stick. It's a big mistake to afford anyone unquestioned authority, no matter how good their intentions may be, it always ends badly. Without actual accountability and consequences for misconduct, you just open the door for the force itself to become a safe harbor for sociopathic behavior. Of course, 9 out of 10 of the people they end up having confrontations with are a whole lot worse, so defaulting to NOT believing them at all works out even worse.

    "Trust but verify."

    Most of the cops I deal with for work are from either the DPD's child abuse or sex crimes unit or the Wayne CO Sheriff's officers, who look for our runaway teens. The cops I deal with seem pretty upright to me, but they are doing jobs that involve helping kids.

    I've had a few people I dealt with over the years that I wouldn't have had too many problems with the sex crimes unit if the perp had accidentally bumped his head on the frame of the cop car while being put in the backseat for transport. I hear that happens a lot to people who are arrested for raping children.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •