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  1. #61  
    Senior Member Generation Why?'s Avatar
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    The Duffel Blog is a military satire website, much like The Onion.
    “A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.”Ayn Rand

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  2. #62  
    Destroyer of Worlds Apocalypse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MstrBlue View Post
    I cannot speak to the truth of this, but I somehow think not.
    While it may be the safest way to protect his grave, because of the insult it represents to that hallowed ground, and that I doubt anyone would cause trouble there, the protests against it would be huge, imho.

    It would be far better, again imho, that they quietly bury him without fanfare, to avoid the crowds of protesters of those he and his crowd have insulted for so long.

    Quietly, and out of the public eye... lest his remains be subject to desecration.


    Of course, his followers are not very clever. Chances are that they will make a spectacle of it.


    The world is better off without him!



    BB
    From Snopes;

    -----------

    Although Phelps received an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point, he never attended and never served his country in uniform This item is a spoof of the Westboro Baptist Church's practice of picketing the funerals of servicemen and women killed in action. The Duffel Blog specializes in military satire, publishing such stories as "Army Runs Out of Red Tape," "Navy Solves Budget Woes By Selling Ship Naming Rights, Launches USS Ford-150," and "Up-Armored Golf Carts Arrive at Bagram Country Club."
    Rest In Peace America
    July 4, 1776 - January 20, 2009
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  3. #63  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    Look at what showed up in AT this week:

    Same Sex Marriage: 'Thoroughly Tiresome,' by Design
    By Doug Mainwaring
    http://americanthinker.com/2014/03/3_18_2014_15_41.html


    Published in 1989, After the Ball is a seminal work which laid out a comprehensive plan to establish the “normalcy” of gays and lesbians and secure broader acceptance and rights. It is subtitled, How America Will conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the 90s.

    The manifesto was laid out by a pair of Harvard graduates. Marshall Kirk (class of 1980) became a researcher in neuropsychiatry. Hunter Madsen (class of 1985) received his degree in Politics and went on to work on Madison Avenue and become an expert in public persuasion tactics and social marketing.



    Published in 1989, After the Ball is a seminal work which laid out a comprehensive plan to establish the “normalcy” of gays and lesbians and secure broader acceptance and rights. It is subtitled, How America Will conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the 90s.

    The manifesto was laid out by a pair of Harvard graduates. Marshall Kirk (class of 1980) became a researcher in neuropsychiatry. Hunter Madsen (class of 1985) received his degree in Politics and went on to work on Madison Avenue and become an expert in public persuasion tactics and social marketing.

    Today, twenty-five years after its publication, what is most striking about their work is this: Their ambitious plan, with a few verb tense changes, could be repackaged and sold as a History book, presenting a very accurate picture of what we have all witnessed happening over the last quarter century. Perhaps the only aspect of the plan that can be faulted just a little is its timeline. It took twenty five years, not ten, to achieve its goals. Not bad. Still an A+.

    American folklore tells us that a young Yale student named Fred Smith penned a paper for an economics class in the early 1960's outlining an overnight delivery service for the computer information age. That paper, rumored to have received a C+, became FedEx.

    The success of the plan laid out in After the Ball parallels that of FedEx, only it was not a business plan; it was a wildly successful social psychology/marketing plan. And it has changed American society every bit as much as FedEx has, and in the long run, probably far more.

    Nuts & Bolts


    I'll focus on just one chapter, which describes the essential components of the plan:

    Part II: Driving the Wedge

    Chapter 3: Strategy: Persuasion, not Invasion

    I’ll refrain from inserting a lot of commentary because it is unnecessary. Every word of this will resonate with anyone who has paid attention to societal and cultural issues over the last twenty five years.

    We have in mind a strategy . . . calculated and powerful . . . manipulative . . . It’s time to learn from Madison Avenue, to roll out the big guns. Gays must launch a large-scale campaign--we've called it the waging peace campaign--to reach straights through the mainstream media. We’re talking about propaganda (page 161).

    You can forget about trying right up front to persuade folks that homosexuality is a good thing. But if you can get them to think it is just another thing--meriting no more than a shrug of the shoulders--then your battle for legal and social rights is virtually won.
    OK, I have to comment: We reached this stage a long time ago. For a humorous take on this, watch episode #1 of "Queer Duck," a cartoon which aired weekly on the Showtime Network beginning in 2002. When Queer Duck decides to come out of closet at work, the response from the waiting room full of patients (Queer Duck is a receptionist at a doctors office) is a communal, "Yeah, so what?"


    Application of the keep-talking principal can get people to the shoulder-shrug stage. The free and frequent discussion of gay rights by a variety of persons in a variety of places gives the impression that homosexuality is commonplace.”

    One more thing: Is being gay really "commonplace?" According to the Williams Institute, the premiere LGBT think tank at UCLA Law, gays and lesbians comprise just 1.7% of the adult population. We gays and lesbians are not all that commonplace, it just seems that way because we have been granted such an overwhelming, high-profile presence by American media.

    Constant talk builds the impression that public opinion is at least divided on the subject and that a sizable bloc -- the most modern up-to-date citizens -- accept or even practice homosexuality.

    .... The main thing is to talk about gayness until the issue becomes thoroughly tiresome (pages 177-178).

    Undermining the Moral Authority of Churches

    [G]ays can undermine the moral authority of . . . churches over less fervent adherents by portraying such institutions as antiquated backwaters badly out of step with the times and with the latest findings of psychology. [This] has already worked well in America against churches on such topics as divorce and abortion. With enough open talk about the prevalence and acceptability of homosexuality, that alliance can work for gays.
    Here I go again: I recently returned to full fellowship with the Catholic Church. Clearly what is meant by “less fervent adherents” are high profile politicos and pundits who cloak themselves in Catholicism, but embrace ideologies antithetical to it, such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Vice President Joe Biden, Governors Cuomo and O’Malley, talking head Chris Matthews, and writer E.J. Dionne.

    In January Pope Francis recounted how a little girl in Buenos Aires told her teacher that she was sad because "my mother's girlfriend doesn't like me." In response, he said:

    "The situation in which we live now provides us with new challenges which sometimes are difficult for us to understand," the Pope told leaders of religious orders, adding that the church "must be careful not to administer a vaccine against faith to them."
    Yet how much more have these surprise validators, operating within the Church's warm embrace, vaccinated others against faith? Perhaps "vaccine" is too mild a term. Whether with good intentions or selfish ones, they have administered venom. They haven't vaccinated against faith: They have poisoned faith with their toxic regressive, pagan ideologies....

    MORE AT THE LINK
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  4. #64  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    I meant what did it mean in *his* case.

    If you get excommunicated from the Catholic church, it could be a number of things. Abortion, birth control, homosexuality. Take your pick. It depends on the Bishop in the area. I wanted to know what Fred Phelps did that made them want to give him the boot.
    One of the family members still in the church said they were not allowed to comment about the internal affairs of the church so we might never know. Until they want a bunch of free publicity and decide to talk to the press.
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  5. #65  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    Look at what showed up in AT this week:

    Same Sex Marriage: 'Thoroughly Tiresome,' by Design
    By Doug Mainwaring
    http://americanthinker.com/2014/03/3_18_2014_15_41.html


    Published in 1989, After the Ball is a seminal work which laid out a comprehensive plan to establish the “normalcy” of gays and lesbians and secure broader acceptance and rights. It is subtitled, How America Will conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the 90s.

    The manifesto was laid out by a pair of Harvard graduates. Marshall Kirk (class of 1980) became a researcher in neuropsychiatry. Hunter Madsen (class of 1985) received his degree in Politics and went on to work on Madison Avenue and become an expert in public persuasion tactics and social marketing.



    Published in 1989, After the Ball is a seminal work which laid out a comprehensive plan to establish the “normalcy” of gays and lesbians and secure broader acceptance and rights. It is subtitled, How America Will conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the 90s.

    The manifesto was laid out by a pair of Harvard graduates. Marshall Kirk (class of 1980) became a researcher in neuropsychiatry. Hunter Madsen (class of 1985) received his degree in Politics and went on to work on Madison Avenue and become an expert in public persuasion tactics and social marketing.

    Today, twenty-five years after its publication, what is most striking about their work is this: Their ambitious plan, with a few verb tense changes, could be repackaged and sold as a History book, presenting a very accurate picture of what we have all witnessed happening over the last quarter century. Perhaps the only aspect of the plan that can be faulted just a little is its timeline. It took twenty five years, not ten, to achieve its goals. Not bad. Still an A+.

    American folklore tells us that a young Yale student named Fred Smith penned a paper for an economics class in the early 1960's outlining an overnight delivery service for the computer information age. That paper, rumored to have received a C+, became FedEx.

    The success of the plan laid out in After the Ball parallels that of FedEx, only it was not a business plan; it was a wildly successful social psychology/marketing plan. And it has changed American society every bit as much as FedEx has, and in the long run, probably far more.

    Nuts & Bolts


    I'll focus on just one chapter, which describes the essential components of the plan:



    OK, I have to comment: We reached this stage a long time ago. For a humorous take on this, watch episode #1 of "Queer Duck," a cartoon which aired weekly on the Showtime Network beginning in 2002. When Queer Duck decides to come out of closet at work, the response from the waiting room full of patients (Queer Duck is a receptionist at a doctors office) is a communal, "Yeah, so what?"


    Application of the keep-talking principal can get people to the shoulder-shrug stage. The free and frequent discussion of gay rights by a variety of persons in a variety of places gives the impression that homosexuality is commonplace.”

    One more thing: Is being gay really "commonplace?" According to the Williams Institute, the premiere LGBT think tank at UCLA Law, gays and lesbians comprise just 1.7% of the adult population. We gays and lesbians are not all that commonplace, it just seems that way because we have been granted such an overwhelming, high-profile presence by American media.




    Undermining the Moral Authority of Churches



    Here I go again: I recently returned to full fellowship with the Catholic Church. Clearly what is meant by “less fervent adherents” are high profile politicos and pundits who cloak themselves in Catholicism, but embrace ideologies antithetical to it, such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Vice President Joe Biden, Governors Cuomo and O’Malley, talking head Chris Matthews, and writer E.J. Dionne.

    In January Pope Francis recounted how a little girl in Buenos Aires told her teacher that she was sad because "my mother's girlfriend doesn't like me." In response, he said:



    Yet how much more have these surprise validators, operating within the Church's warm embrace, vaccinated others against faith? Perhaps "vaccine" is too mild a term. Whether with good intentions or selfish ones, they have administered venom. They haven't vaccinated against faith: They have poisoned faith with their toxic regressive, pagan ideologies....

    MORE AT THE LINK
    Good find.
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  6. #66  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    Rob, I did not defend people who had abortions. I stated what I thought a lot of people are capable of and why. Learn the difference between analyzing something and condoning it. If you can't read my posts without twisting and turning it into something it's not, then forget it.
    Over analyzing by trying to use a "gay gene" scenario? Any thing to make you feel better about the hate your political party supports, the hate for the unborn.
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