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  1. #1 Take that Moochell.... 
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
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    Blue Eye, MO, is a small Ozark community on the MO/AR border just south of us.

    The breakfast menu for the Blue Eye elementary school this morning is pork sausage patty, biscuit and gravy. That's how you start the day in the Ozarks...

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    Senior Member MstrBlue's Avatar
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    Clearly, this school knows that children learn the best when they have a PROPER breakfast!
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  3. #3  
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    That's how you start the day in the states that are, respectively, 40th and 46th out of the 50 in life expectancy.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ife_expectancy
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  4. #4  
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    OK, you made me look. I pulled up the menu for that elementary school, and the other choices are pancakes, cereal, oatmeal, yogurt and fruit. Even the sausage biscuit has the "heart healthy" symbol next to it, which gives one the sneaking suspicion that it might be turkey sausage. On the menu it just says "sausage", not specifically "pork sausage".
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  5. #5  
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    OK, you made me look. I pulled up the menu for that elementary school, and the other choices are pancakes, cereal, oatmeal, yogurt and fruit. Even the sausage biscuit has the "heart healthy" symbol next to it, which gives one the sneaking suspicion that it might be turkey sausage. On the menu it just says "sausage", not specifically "pork sausage".
    In these parts, there's "sausage" and there's "turkey sausage" - they're not the same. Turkey sausage is for the tourists. And the Arkansas Razorbacks aren't called "Hogs" without reason.
    Besides, you can live every "healthy" life style you want, but you're still gonna die. Enjoy life. I'll take my 70+ years with sensibility before I'll take 90+ with senility and a catheter in a wheelchair.

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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by marv View Post
    Besides, you can live every "healthy" life style you want, but you're still gonna die. Enjoy life. I'll take my 70+ years with sensibility before I'll take 90+ with senility and a catheter in a wheelchair.
    That's very true; although the choice isn't just 70/healthy and 90/senile. My father is 94, eats what he wants, has a very sharp mind and speaks it (just ask his son-in-law!). A lot of it is genetics. But there are whole parts of the country that by "heritage" have an unhealthy style of eating; it's no accident that the deep south is known as the "stroke belt". All types of food can be enjoyed in moderation, but a lot of people don't know what "moderation" means.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    That's very true; although the choice isn't just 70/healthy and 90/senile. My father is 94, eats what he wants, has a very sharp mind and speaks it (just ask his son-in-law!). A lot of it is genetics. But there are whole parts of the country that by "heritage" have an unhealthy style of eating; it's no accident that the deep south is known as the "stroke belt". All types of food can be enjoyed in moderation, but a lot of people don't know what "moderation" means.
    My grandparents both lived past 90. Grandma, who was very overweight, had a stroke at 85 and spent the last 7 years of her life in a nursing home. A very nice, expensive nursing home.

    Grandpa lived to be 98, and lived independently until he checked into the hospital for the last time . He ate bacon for breakfast at least 3 days a week. He used butter and not margerine. He drank coffee and ate sweets. He ate Grandma's cooking until she had the stroke-she basted everything in butter, fried potatos as a side dish, and so on.

    He always said the secrets to living healthy into old age were 1. stay as active as your body will let you be and 2. eat the brownest bread you can on a daily basis. He had a breadmaker and made his own wheat bread after Grandma went to the nursing home-that many less unnatural ingredients than store-bought bread. The last summer he was alive, he was still cutting his own grass and re-upholstering furniture that he fished out of the dump.
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    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    That's how you start the day in the states that are, respectively, 40th and 46th out of the 50 in life expectancy.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ife_expectancy
    Jim Fixx was such a fitness nut, he wrote a book on running. He died at 54. Yule Gibbons, a health food guru died at 64. Curly Joe DeRita, the last remaining Stooge to die, was over 300lbs, smoked cigars, and drank like a fish. He lived to be 83.
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Jim Fixx was such a fitness nut, he wrote a book on running. He died at 54. Yule Gibbons, a health food guru died at 64. Curly Joe DeRita, the last remaining Stooge to die, was over 300lbs, smoked cigars, and drank like a fish. He lived to be 83.
    With the first two, it came down to the heart -- Jim Fixx's exploded at an early age as his father's had. Euell Gibbons had a ruptured aorta, which very few people live through.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  10. #10  
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    My grandparents both lived past 90. Grandma, who was very overweight, had a stroke at 85 and spent the last 7 years of her life in a nursing home. A very nice, expensive nursing home.

    Grandpa lived to be 98, and lived independently until he checked into the hospital for the last time . He ate bacon for breakfast at least 3 days a week. He used butter and not margerine. He drank coffee and ate sweets. He ate Grandma's cooking until she had the stroke-she basted everything in butter, fried potatos as a side dish, and so on.

    He always said the secrets to living healthy into old age were 1. stay as active as your body will let you be and 2. eat the brownest bread you can on a daily basis. He had a breadmaker and made his own wheat bread after Grandma went to the nursing home-that many less unnatural ingredients than store-bought bread. The last summer he was alive, he was still cutting his own grass and re-upholstering furniture that he fished out of the dump.
    Good for them, they both sound like they were good solid people.
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