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  1. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I'm sure managers at fast food restaurants make decent money. They have a lot of job responsibilities, some of which require some education-accounting skills, in particular.


    I like the idea of a lower minimum wage for those under 18, if the US is stupid enough to raise minimum wage to $15 an hour. As it is, young people ages 16-18 are having trouble getting the jobs that used to be theirs for the asking.
    That's great, but it means that no one over 18 ever gets hired for an entry-level or nearly entry-level job. Why would I pay an 18-year-old high school graduate $15/hour (plus the taxes, insurance, etc., etc., which really means that the cost of that employee is closer to about double that amount) to flip burgers when I can hire someone in the class behind him for $7.50 or $10 or whatever per hour? I'll get roughly the same amount of work out of each. Why pay more?
    Olde-style, states' rights conservative. Ask if this concept confuses you.
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  2. #12  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apocalypse View Post
    Yea, this is easy debunk.

    First lets look at cost of living differences.



    And disposable income after taxes.



    Might be making $21 an hour. But wait for it....


    Which that $1 more then mim wage if you really work it out, translates into about shit over min if you take it all into consideration.
    Most fast food workers with some experience already make a dollar more then minimum wage in the United States, in some cities and location they start higher then that. In n Out burger starts employees at $10.50 and they get a free meal during their shift.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member oldcoastie!'s Avatar
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    Do the math.......$7.51 Norway vs $4.68 USA.


    While the average price of a Big Mac in the United is $4.68, the same sandwich will cost you a lot more after currency adjustments in these top five countries. Due to the lack of reliable data and an inconsistent policy on ranking high inflation countries, we chose to remove Venezuela from this list; the Big Mac Index claims its sandwich comes in at $7.15.

    Top 5 Most expensive countries on the Big Mac Index
    Brazil Big Mac Index
    Brazil is one of the top five most expensive countries on the Big Mac Index

    5. Brazil – $5.28
    While critics of the Big Mac Index point out how Argentina’s insane president cooks the books on her country’s double-digit inflation, Brazil is officially the most expensive country in South America to buy a Big Mac. As of a recent survey, Brazilians pay a little more than 10 Brazilian real for each individual sandwich. As one of the most expensive countries in the Southern Hemisphere, it’s no surprise that Brazil makes the list.

    Denmark Big Mac Index
    Denmark is one of the top countries on The Economist’s Big Mac Index
    4. Denmark – $5.37

    The Big Mac Index places socialist Denmark as the fourth most expensive hamburger in the world – almost a full $1 more expensive than the same sandwich in The Land of the Free. While Denmark has been ranked one of the most economically free European countries, it also imposes stringent regulations on businesses. Taxes don’t help, either; Denmark has raised its value added tax (VAT) from the low single digits a few decades ago, to its current 25% level. Income taxes are as high as 59%. And if you eat too many Big Macs, you might get hit by Denmark’s “fat tax”.

    Sweden has one of the world’s most expensive Big Macs
    3. Sweden – $6.16
    Sweden’s position on the Big Mac Index shows, according to the survey, that its kroner currency is overvalued by 35.1%. An average price of 41.6 kroner for one of McDonalds’ classic sandwiches makes Sweden the third most expensive country to buy one, which should come as no surprise to those who understand Sweden’s obssession with social and income equality (despite proof it hasn’t really worked).

    Switzerland Big Mac Index
    Switzerland is one of the world’s most expensive countries to eat in, as backed up by the Big Mac Index
    2. Switzerland – $6.72
    McDonald’s combo meals in Switzerland can cost as much as $15 thanks to the country’s Swiss franc and its status as one of the most expensive countries in the world. However, such prices may seem tame when you consider that a decent dinner in Zurich can easily cost $60 without alcohol, and a decent hotel room in Geneva can easily top $200. At those prices, you may be rushing to stock up on the world’s most expensive Big Mac. According to The Economist’s “light hearted” data, this data indicates the Swiss franc is a whopping 47.5% overvalued, the second highest in the world.

    Norway Big Mac Index
    Norway is the most expensive country to buy fast food according to the Big Mac Index
    1. Norway – $7.51
    It’s hard to find inexpensive food in Norway. The country’s high VAT on restaurant dining makes it hard to eat out on a budget, for a number of reasons. And that’s reflected in Norway’s position on the Big Mac Index. Norway, one of the most expensive countries in the world, is also home to the priciest McDonald’s combo meal, at around $23. Norway prides itself on healthy and organic living, which may explain the lack of uproar over expensive fast food.
    http://nomadcapitalist.com/2013/11/2...big-mac-index/
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member oldcoastie!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    Supposedly not that much.
    Not true. Check my post.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member oldcoastie!'s Avatar
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    For Denmark:

    THE DENMARK EXPERIENCE: Highest Fast Food Wages In The World

    denmark mcd

    Louise Marie Rantzau works at a McDonald's in Copenhagen. Though there is no formal minimum wage, Denmark boasts one of the highest wages for fast food workers in the world. Unions secured a collective bargaining agreement with McDonald's in 1989 that has allowed workers to negotiate pay ever since, and all workers currently make about $21 per hour in U.S. dollars.

    The downside? McDonald's food is significantly more expensive; a Big Mac there set you back $5.18 as of January 2014, compared to $4.62 in the U.S.

    Rantzau sympathizes with American fast food workers, since many of them have to use all of their wages to support families. By comparison, she said, most workers are unmarried teenagers in Denmark. In the U.S., the median age of fast food workers is 29, more than 36 percent of workers over 20 years old have children and roughly 20 percent live below the federal poverty line.

    "You wouldn't be able to pay your rent or anything [being paid $7.25]" Rantzau told HuffPost. "I believe in a world where you work to get money you actually can live with."
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_5324938.html
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  6. #16  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldcoastie! View Post
    Do the math.......$7.51 Norway vs $4.68 USA.




    http://nomadcapitalist.com/2013/11/2...big-mac-index/
    $23 bucks for a value meal. Not bad, a family of four should be able to get out of there for about $80 as long as the kids are not big eaters.
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  7. #17  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Wood View Post
    That's great, but it means that no one over 18 ever gets hired for an entry-level or nearly entry-level job. Why would I pay an 18-year-old high school graduate $15/hour (plus the taxes, insurance, etc., etc., which really means that the cost of that employee is closer to about double that amount) to flip burgers when I can hire someone in the class behind him for $7.50 or $10 or whatever per hour? I'll get roughly the same amount of work out of each. Why pay more?

    Someone over 18 can work any hours of the day. A teen employee can't be worked during school hours (September-June) nor can he work after 9 pm.

    It would give a McDonald's a young workforce from 4-9 at night and an adult workforce from 6 am-4 pm, and again after 9 pm.
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  8. #18  
    http://bigmacindex.org/2014-big-mac-index.html

    Qty(1) BigMac in Denmark- $5.18

    Qty(1) BigMac in USA- $4.62

    Not a terribly large price gap. I expect the average Dane fast food worker is much more productive than staff in the USA. On that income the Dane will pay about 50% in income taxes plus a 25% VAT tax on purchases which largely accounts for the higher cost of living. The American making say $8 - 9/hr will pay around 25% in withheld taxes and 7 - 12% in sales tax on purchases. The Dane I expect receives far more actual value for his/her tax burden than does an American.

    For the Danes ( a small Country with a single ethnic group) their system works. For the USA it would mean even greater ethnic friction than we have already. For US the best approach would be to end Federal subsidy ........PERIOD. Hold the Feds strictly to enumerated Powers and the required level of Spending & Taxation to execute those Powers. How to wind down SSI in such a Regime? My thought is Bonds with ALL Federal Land as collateral. Too the Feds need to unwind the rent seeking fortunes their period of misrule has made possible. Revisiting and revoking the idea of 14th amendment 'personhood' would be an excellent place to start. Among the 50 States if some wish to try a Dane style welfare state that is purely their call as would be the consequences.
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