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  1. #1 Injection for Diabetes 
    One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

    mice with diet-induced diabetes -- the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans -- a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. The discovery by Salk scientists, published today in the journal Nature, could lead to a new generation of safer, more effective diabetes drugs.


    The team found that sustained treatment with the protein doesn't merely keep blood sugar under control, but also reverses insulin insensitivity, the underlying physiological cause of diabetes. Equally exciting, the newly developed treatment doesn't result in side effects common to most current diabetes treatments.
    "Controlling glucose is a dominant problem in our society," says Ronald M. Evans, director of Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory and corresponding author of the paper. "And FGF1 offers a new method to control glucose in a powerful and unexpected way."
    Type 2 diabetes, which can be brought on by excess weight and inactivity, has skyrocketed over the past few decades in the United States and around the world. Almost 30 million Americans are estimated to have the disease, where glucose builds up in the bloodstream because not enough sugar-carting insulin is produced or because cells have become insulin-resistant, ignoring signals to absorb sugar. As a chronic disease, diabetes can cause serious health problems and has no specific cure. Rather it is managed -- with varying levels of success -- through a combination of diet, exercise and pharmaceuticals.
    Diabetes drugs currently on the market aim to boost insulin levels and reverse insulin resistance by changing expression levels of genes to lower glucose levels in the blood. But drugs, such as Byetta, which increase the body's production of insulin, can cause glucose levels to dip too low and lead to life-threatening hypoglycemia, as well as other side effects.
    In 2012, Evans and his colleagues discovered that a long-ignored growth factor had a hidden function: it helps the body respond to insulin. Unexpectedly, mice lacking the growth factor, called FGF1, quickly develop diabetes when placed on a high-fat diet, a finding suggesting that FGF1 played a key role in managing blood glucose levels. This led the researchers to wonder whether providing extra FGF1 to diabetic mice could affect symptoms of the disease.
    Evans' team injected doses of FGF1 into obese mice with diabetes to assess the protein's potential impact on metabolism. Researchers were stunned by what happened: they found that with a single dose, blood sugar levels quickly dropped to normal levels in all the diabetic mice.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0716131541.htm
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
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    I will keep my eye on this. I have type 2 and take once a day insulin shot in either my thigh or my stomach. I would be more than happy to give up this process.

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    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Wow this is exciting news. Medical trials take a long time, but something like this is worth the wait!

    Great article.

    My mom was type 2 then as she aged it changed to insulin dependent type 2 and at the time doctors were being told they were waiting too long to put patients on insulin. Now she has a new doctor that is young and very smart and he was able to get her off the insulin. She simply takes two pills every day. Her blood sugar has never been better.

    I know others that have been type 1 since childhood and a couple have insulin pumps. Does not sound fun.
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  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    Wow this is exciting news. Medical trials take a long time, but something like this is worth the wait!

    Great article.

    My mom was type 2 then as she aged it changed to insulin dependent type 2 and at the time doctors were being told they were waiting too long to put patients on insulin. Now she has a new doctor that is young and very smart and he was able to get her off the insulin. She simply takes two pills every day. Her blood sugar has never been better.

    I know others that have been type 1 since childhood and a couple have insulin pumps. Does not sound fun.

    I can't imagine living off of shots my entire life. This does sound exciting.
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  5. #5  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    I can't imagine living off of shots my entire life. This does sound exciting.
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    Senior Member MstrBlue's Avatar
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    I have been on insulin since Dec 17, 2011 (thanks for THAT Christmas present, doc!)
    Seriously, though, this research does sound promising!

    Still... one injection lasting two to three days? That may work for fat rats, but I question the effectiveness with humans. I take two types of insulin myself, one long-acting, for all-day control, and one fast-acting to treat spikes, like after eating.
    How can a single shot every couple days deal with these transitory spikes?

    Granted, I am excited for the research!
    And I hope that it continues!
    But, I will not expect the necessary tests to be completed during my lifetime.
    I hope I am wrong, for the future of those young people with diabetes, if not for myself.

    Hope will always win out!


    BB
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  7. #7  
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    I follow these developments, as I am one of those people at risk of developing it. My glucose runs a little high from time to time (not high enough for diagnosis), and I watch my weight, diet, and exercise levels rigorously. Anything that keeps more and more of the population from developing this awful disease is all to the good.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  8. #8  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Anything that keeps more and more of the population from developing this awful disease is all to the good.
    I agree.
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