Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1 President of U of South Carolina: Courses on Constitution "archaic" 
    Power CUer
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,767
    Not long ago, the University of South Carolina replaced "Gender Studies" with the Constitution under a new South Carolina state law requiring courses on the founding documents. Considering how other academic types feel about the Constitution, it's not a surprise that there should be major backlash. Here is the latest.


    Losing Our Liberties, One Degree at a Time
    http://www.realclearpolicy.com/blog/...time_1011.html

    By Thomas K. Lindsay

    Does democratic liberty depend on civic education? America's founders thought so. While we expect students to acquire job-relevant skills in college, we also hope for something more, something higher, than employment training alone, as expressed by Thomas Jefferson's cautionary remark, "Any nation that expects to be both ignorant and free ... expects what never was and never will be." Our freedoms are not guaranteed. They must be re-earned, through being relearned, by every generation.

    Forget all that now. Harris Pastides, president of the University of South Carolina, has sparked a conflagration by refusing to obey a state requirement that public universities instruct students in the "essentials of the United States Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, and the Federalist Papers." His justification for flouting the law? It's "archaic." This is but the latest example of American higher education's abdication of its responsibility to do more than provide job training (which, by the way, it's also doing poorly, say employers).

    It would be unfair to focus our indignation on Pastides alone. Today, most colleges fail to require even one introductory course in American government. The result? Department of Education statistics show that only one-third of graduates ever complete such a course. More disturbing is the reason for this academic turnabout. Carol Schneider, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, reported that "after five years of active discussions on dozens of campuses," she found "not just a neglect of but a resistance to college-level study of United States democratic principles."

    Required courses constituting a "core curriculum" of studies in American government and American history, as well as economics, philosophy, and "Western Civ," were attacked in the late '60s and early '70s as irrelevant, producing a decades-long dismantling of such requirements and with them, the study of the Great Books. The effect has been all too predictable: The landmark national study of collegiate learning Academically Adrift employed the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) to measure how much undergraduates increase their mastery of fundamental intellectual skills during college. The study found that 36 percent of students showed "small or empirically non-existent" gains in "general collegiate skills" -- critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing skills -- after four years invested in college....


    U. of South Carolina President Refuses to Teach Nation’s Founding Documents
    http://collegeinsurrection.com/2014/...ing-documents/

    This is a violation of state law. It’s also unethical and surprisingly anti-academic behavior for a college president.

    Dave Huber of the College Fix reports.

    U. of South Carolina President Violates State Law

    It’s state law: all public universities must teach about the nation’s founding documents, but University of South Carolina President Harris Pastides is refusing to follow it. He says teaching about the Constitution and other founding-era writings is “archaic.”

    Ironically, the college claims the law itself is unconstitutional. The Daily Signal reports:

    When asked about this by a student at an academic forum in 2013, the vice provost of USC, Dr. Helen Doerpinghaus, claimed that while the university did not follow the letter of the law, it did follow the “spirit of the law” by handing out pocket-sized Constitutions on Constitution Day. Under this logic, the university must believe it could teach students chemistry by handing out a copy of the Periodic Table on World Science Day on Nov. 10.

    Starting in December 2013, several concerned state legislators wrote to the university asking about this failure. President Pastides responded by saying the law was “archaic” and giving multiple reasons for the university’s noncompliance. He also claimed that about 60 percent of students take a political science or history class that discusses these documents, which, of course, means that approximately 40 percent of students don’t take those classes and do not receive a proper grounding in our founding documents and the principles that animate them.

    The university’s main concern is a part of the law that requires a student’s “power of loyalty” to the Constitution “be examined” before graduating.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    751
    The ignorance taught in institutions of "higher learning" is on full display every time O'Reilly has a "Water's World" segment and in the old Jay Leno "Jay Walking" segments.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Power CUer
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,767
    Quote Originally Posted by thundley4 View Post
    The ignorance taught in institutions of "higher learning" is on full display every time O'Reilly has a "Water's World" segment and in the old Jay Leno "Jay Walking" segments.
    But here, a state school is breaking the law. Ironically, they are saying the law is "Unconstitutional" even as they refuse to teach the Constitution on which they are basing their opinion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    751
    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    But here, a state school is breaking the law. Ironically, they are saying the law is "Unconstitutional" even as they refuse to teach the Constitution on which they are basing their opinion.
    The state should cut the salaries of those involved or cut funding to the college.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I came to Texas as soon as I could
    Posts
    5,871
    The university’s main concern is a part of the law that requires a student’s “power of loyalty” to the Constitution “be examined” before graduating.
    Before I choose whom to discuss and/or cuss, I want to know more about this part of the law.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    A man is but a product of his thoughts. What he thinks, he becomes. Gandhi
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol
    When I judge someone's integrity one key thing I look at is - How does s/he treat people s/he doesn't agree with or does not like?
    I can respect someone who I do not agree with, but I have NO respect for someone who puts others down in a public forum. That is the hallmark of someone who has no integrity, and cannot be trusted.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    748
    My son is attending USC(U of South Carolina not to be confused with USC California). I guess I'll have to continue to pound this stuff into his head because the intelligent elite refuse to do it.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •