Results 1 to 9 of 9

Hybrid View

  1. #1 "I Will Follow Him": Obama As My Personal Jesus 
    HR Corporate Scum patriot45's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Plant City, Florida
    Posts
    10,917
    I first thought to post this in the humor forum, but it shows the type of college nitwits that are going to be voting. Gotta a be a moonbat from DUmmie land!! Or is it eyelid!?:eek:

    The rest of the idiocy here

    Maggie Mertens

    Obama is my homeboy. And I'm not saying that because he's black - I'm saying that in reference to those Urban Outfitters t-shirts from a couple years ago that said, "Jesus is my homeboy." Yes, I just said it. Obama is my Jesus.

    While you may be overtly religious and find this to be idol-worshipping, or may be overtly politically correct and just know that everything in that sentence could be found offensive, I'm afraid it's true anyway.

    As with many spiritual enlightenments, mine came in the middle of a bleak, hopeless period of my life. The innocent, idealistic world of politics that had shaped my childhood, the one that taught me how the president is a good guy, one who makes you feel safe, gives a speech on TV every once in a while and one you'd feel honored to shake hands with, had been slowly whittled into a deep rooted cynicism to anything politically related.

    The crush of the Bush victory over Gore was only the first mar on my previously consummate ideal of the American administration. And the tragedies just kept continuing: Bush's response to the Sept.11 attacks, the invasion of Iraq, the tax cuts for the rich, the downward spiral continued squashing my scant hope that the political world and state of our country could be saved.

    Then I found my miracle. Stumbling through my hopeless world, afraid to turn to anyone with my political questions of morality, my concerns about the afterlife of the country I called home, a voice spoke to me.

    Barack Obama bore to me his testimony in 2004 at the Democratic National Convention, a testimony that included believing in concepts as simple and wholesome as the Constitution; a belief the current administration had done away with entirely. I was 17 and my antipathy for politicians was already in place before I had even reached the age to legally vote for one. He, though, seemed different. I was intrigued. I would follow him. I believed however, that my discipleship would lead me on a much longer path to political change than was true. He was much too young, not white enough, not rich enough, not jaded - the country certainly wasn't ready for this, maybe in 12 or 16 years he would be able to run in the Democratic primary, I thought.

    : “Grow your own dope. Plant a liberal.”
    ” Obummercare, 20 percent of the time it works everytime.
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member YupItsMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Vermont (yeah, I know)
    Posts
    530
    This is why when Cold Warrior and others talk about one state being "smarter" than another because of the pectentage of college graduates, I laugh. This is about the total depth of thought coming out of the average American university these days. All you have to do is watch Jay Leno's "Jaywalkers - College Edition" to see the best and the brightest.
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member xavierob82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    288
    Well, the author of the article Maggie Mertens is black.

    It's obvious to see why the blacks will be absolutely thrilled with Obama as president, not since Lincoln will we see this level of deification of a presidential candidate by the black community.
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member Rebel Yell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    South GA
    Posts
    5,181
    Quote Originally Posted by xavierob82 View Post
    Well, the author of the article Maggie Mertens is black.

    It's obvious to see why the blacks will be absolutely thrilled with Obama as president, not since Lincoln will we see this level of deification of a presidential candidate by the black community.
    And just like Lincoln, Obama will use them for all they're worth and not give two shits about them.


    The fact that Americans (especially Republicans) hold Lincoln up as something great, shows exactly how ignorant the average American is.
    I feel that once a black fella has referred to white foks as "honky paleface devil white-trash cracker redneck Caspers," he's abdicated the right to get upset about the "N" word. But that's just me. -- Jim Goad
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member xavierob82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    288
    Lincoln would be a liberal Democrat today. It is doubtful Republicans like him all that much.

    Here are some great Lincoln quotes:

    "What is conservatism? Is it not adherence to the old and tried, against the new and untried?"

    "Every advocate of slavery naturally desires to see blasted, and crushed, the liberty promised the black man by the new constitution."

    "Capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fleece the people."

    "The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do, at all, or can not, so well do, for themselves -- in their separate, and individual capacities."



    Great man, that Lincoln. One of our greatest presidents.
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The West
    Posts
    1,618
    He would not be a liberal democrat such as exists today. He'd fit in more with the likes of democrats such as Kennedy or Moynihan. The kind of democrat before the party was taken over by the far left.
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member xavierob82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    288
    Lincoln was VERY progressive for his time. If he has any comparison to to any contemporary politician today, it would be Russ Feingold. A pragmatist. But a liberal nonetheless.

    Lincoln also spoke out rabidly against the Mexican-American War when he was in the Illinios senate. Very daring for his time.
     

  8. #8  
    Senior Member xavierob82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    288
    Quote Originally Posted by Lager View Post
    He would not be a liberal democrat such as exists today. He'd fit in more with the likes of democrats such as Kennedy or Moynihan. The kind of democrat before the party was taken over by the far left.


    According to the wingnuts on the right, even JFK was a Marxist-Communist. Kennedy was probably as liberal a Democrat you were ever going to get in the 1950s/early 1960s. Even Ronald Reagan called JFK a Marxist.

    Of course, had he lived, JFK would have drifted left just like his brothers Teddy and RFK.


    Just check out a couple of examples of anti-JFK right-wing propaganda in the 1960s:

    http://www.lawsch.uga.edu/academics/..._24_flyer2.jpg

    http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/jfki...its/ce1031.jpg
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member Rebel Yell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    South GA
    Posts
    5,181
    xavier,

    Here's a few more.....

    I acknowledge the constitutional rights of the States — not grudgingly, but fairly and fully, and I will give them any legislation for reclaiming their fugitive slaves.

    The point the Republican party wanted to stress was to oppose making slave States out of the newly acquired territory, not abolishing slavery as it then existed.

    Lincoln in speeches at Peoria, Illinois

    I have no purpose directly or indirectly to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.

    Lincoln's Inaugural Address

    Do the people of the South really entertain fear that a Republican administration would directly or indirectly interfere with their slaves, or with them about their slaves? If they do, I wish to assure you as once a friend, and still, I hope, not an enemy , that there is no cause for such fears. The South would be in no more danger in this respect than it was in the days of Washington.

    Letter from Lincoln to A.H. Stephens
    Public and Private Letters of Alexander Stephens, p. 150


    I am not now, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in any way the social or political equality of the white and black races. I am not now nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of Negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor of intermarriages with white people. There is a physical difference between the white and the black races which will forever forbid the two races living together on social or political equality. There must be a position of superior and inferior, and I am in favor of assigning the superior position to the white man.
    Lincoln in his speech to Charleston, Illinois, 1858

    Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up and shake off the existing government and to form one that suits them better. Nor is this right confined to cases in which the people of an existing government may choose to exercise it. Any portion of such people that can, may make their own of such territory as they inhabit. More than this, a majority of any portion of such people may revolutionize, putting down a minority intermingling with or near them who oppose their movement.

    Lincoln on the floor of Congress, 13 January 1848
    Congressional Globe, Appendix
    1st Session 30th Congress, page 94




    A little extra reading,

    Mr. Wendell Phillips said that Lincoln was badgered into issuing the emancipation proclamation, and that after it was issued, Lincoln said it was the greatest folly of his life.
    President Lincoln in his Emancipation Proclamation evidently had in mind to colonize or segregate the slaves if freed:

    It is my purpose to colonize persons of African descent, with their consent, upon this continent or elsewhere, with the previously obtained consent of the government existing there.

    He later said, in discussing the options of colonizing them with segregated areas of Texas, Mississippi and South Carolina:

    If we turn 200,000 armed Negroes in the South, among their former owners, from whom we have taken their arms, it will inevitably lead to a race war. It cannot be done. The Negroes must be gotten rid of.
    Ben Butler responded to this by saying: "Why not send them to Panama to dig the canal?" Lincoln was delighted with this suggestion, and asked Butler to consult Seward at once. Only a few days later, John Wilkes Booth assassinated Lincoln and one of his conspirators wounded Seward.
    I feel that once a black fella has referred to white foks as "honky paleface devil white-trash cracker redneck Caspers," he's abdicated the right to get upset about the "N" word. But that's just me. -- Jim Goad
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •