Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1 Driving when drowsy 
    Senior Member oldcoastie!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    316
    Somewhat dated, but I'll bet there are few changes.


    Facts and Stats


    According to the National Sleep Foundation’s 2005 Sleep in America poll, 60% of adult drivers – about 168 million people – say they have driven a vehicle while feeling drowsy in the past year, and more than one-third, (37% or 103 million people), have actually fallen asleep at the wheel! In fact, of those who have nodded off, 13% say they have done so at least once a month. Four percent – approximately eleven million drivers – admit they have had an accident or near accident because they dozed off or were too tired to drive.

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conservatively estimates that 100,000 police-reported crashes are the direct result of driver fatigue each year. This results in an estimated 1,550 deaths, 71,000 injuries, and $12.5 billion in monetary losses. These figures may be the tip of the iceberg, since currently it is difficult to attribute crashes to sleepiness.

    There is no test to determine sleepiness as there is for intoxication, i.e. a “Breathalyzer”.

    State reporting practices are inconsistent. There is little or no police training in identifying drowsiness as a crash factor. Every state currently addresses fatigue and/or sleepiness in some way in their crash report forms. However, the codes are inconsistent and two states (Missouri and Wisconsin) do not have specific codes for fatigue and/or fell asleep.

    Self-reporting is unreliable.

    Drowsiness/fatigue may play a role in crashes attributed to other causes such as alcohol. About one million such crashes annually are thought to be produced by driver inattention/lapses.

    According to data from Australia, England, Finland, and other European nations, all of whom have more consistent crash reporting procedures than the U.S., drowsy driving represents 10 to 30 percent of all crashes.

    Who is at risk?

    Sleep related crashes are most common in young people, especially men, adults with children and shift workers. According to the NSF’s 2002 poll:

    http://drowsydriving.org/about/facts-and-stats/
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I came to Texas as soon as I could
    Posts
    5,276
    That one truly hits home. Never again! Although I never had an accident as a result, when on duty 24 hrs a day for a 6 or 9 day shift it can get mighty sleepy out there. The easiest ones are going back to the shop after the job. I kept a pillow in the car and would just pull over and lay down. Lots of scary tales I could tell.
    Then I started suffering from sleep apnea and went some time without realizing what I was experiencing. Thankfully my cardiologists saw it and directed the diagnosis. Great sleeping almost every night since and haven't dozed off behind the wheel since '94.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    Live every day as if it were your last, because one of these days, it will be.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •