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  1. #1 179 years ago, General Santa Anna surrendered to General Sam Houston 
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    Texans all over the world will be remembering the events of April 21, 1836 where in a prairie near what would one day be La Porte, the Lone Star State took its next step into legend.

    The clash between General Sam Houston’s Texas rebels and General Santa Anna's troops that day ended with a Texan victory, concluding the Texas Revolution.

    Cries of “Remember the Alamo!” and “Remember Goliad” disturbed the slumber of Mexican troops taking siestas under trees.

    The ensuing firefight was only 18 minutes long, starting at around 3:30 p.m., with 630 Mexicans killed. There were nine dead Texans out of just over 900 fighters. About 730 Mexicans would be taken prisoner by Houston’s men.

    General Santa Anna had no lookouts posted and if he had, it’s unclear just how the day would have shaken out for General Houston and the rest.

    Houston was wounded in the ankle by a rifle ball in the fight. He accepted the surrender of Santa Anna while sitting down under an oak tree on a blanket. Santa Anna, a prisoner of war, was found in nearby tall grass the day before dressed as a common soldier and not the brave general he purported to be.


    http://www.chron.com/news/houston-te...na-6211970.php
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  2. #2  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    179 years later and we have surrendered.
    "If the Bible is true why don't we have any urns or vessels that like say expires 6/15/300 BC on the bottom?"
    Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    179 years later and we have surrendered.
    Not yet. Not as long as we've got a Republican in the Governor's mansion.

    But it does seem like the descendants of Santa Ana are hell bent on trying to take us back.
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  4. #4  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    It was April 1942, and World War II had the nation in a chokehold. In the fight against Japan, the small island of Corregidor in Manila Bay was the last of America’s strongholds in the area. As the small island continued to be pummeled by artillery shells from Japanese planes, the only safe spot for American soldiers was the bombproof Malinta Tunnel. The 830-foot by 35-foot passageway—used as headquarters, a supply depot and makeshift hospital—became the spot of Aggie legend.

    It was April 21,—San Jacinto Day, Brig. Gen. George F. Moore, Class of 1908, realized. According to the book
    Softly Call the Muster by John A. Adams, Jr. ’73, Moore asked another Aggie, Maj. Tom Dooley ’35, if they
    could get a list of the Aggies fighting at Corregidor. There were 24 of them.

    “So, we had a roll call, and a muster is a roll call,” Dooley was quoted as saying. He sent word to one of the
    news correspondents reporting from the island, and the reporter wired the story back to the states.

    Sometimes in tradition, truth and legend land so close together, a historian can get whiplash. And somewhere along the newswire, the tale of Aggie Muster at Corregidor grew wings, said retired University Archivist David Chapman ’67. The Houston Post ran the headline, “Aggies Fete San Jacinto—35 Texans Bear Down on Famed Fight Song.” The story said the group gathered in the tunnel and “sang Texas songs.”

    Impossible, said Chapman. The story is debunked by other accounts, too. It was war, Chapman said. Artillery
    shells rained from the sky; there was no way the Aggies would have physically gathered together, he said.

    But as a historian, Chapman calls no foul. The story, he explained, gave hope to a nation and helped cement
    the genuine celebration Muster triggers now. It gave Muster an international standing. This year there will be
    more than 325 Musters held around the world, but it was that 1942 Muster that provided the inspiration for what Muster has become.


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