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  1. #1 Muslims Protest Soccer Balls 
    Images on Soccer Balls Offend Muslim Sensibilities

    Wednesday, November 12, 2008
    By Patrick Goodenough, International Editor

    Images from a Saudi flag on a soccer ball are drawing complaints from Muslims in South Africa, host of the 2010 World Cup.(CNSNews.com) – An Islamic clerics’ group in South Africa is protesting the appearance of Koranic text in advertising and promotional merchandise for the soccer World Cup, which the country is hosting in 2010.

    At issue are soccer balls featuring images of flags of the world, including those of Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq. All three flags include words from the Koran.

    The Council of Muslim Theologians, based in Johannesburg, said in a statement that the use of text which Muslims consider sacred “has the potential of offending adherents of the Islamic faith.”

    “We would therefore like to bring to the attention of publishers, advertisers, printers, publicists and all concerned about the sensitivities the Muslim community has about the use of any type of media with sacred Islamic text,” it said.

    Although Muslims comprise less than two percent of South Africa’s population, the community is an influential one, with activists frequently protesting against Israeli and American policies.

    (snip)

    Allah everywhere

    Muslim groups have on numerous occasions complained about images or words being used in ways they consider blasphemous, and Western business interests invariably back down.

    In 2005, Burger King restaurants in Britain withdrew an ice cream product after Muslim customers said a label design – a stylized swirl of soft serve – looked like the Arabic script for “Allah,” when viewed sideways. The Muslim Council of Britain commended the company for “sensitive and prompt action.”

    Pamphlets have circulated in Muslim countries alleging that the famous swirly-scripted Coca Cola symbol, if viewed in a mirror, resembles the Arabic words, “No Mohammed, no Mecca.”

    In a “myths and rumors” section on its Web site, the Coca Cola Co. dismisses the charge, noting that “the trademark was created in 1886 in Atlanta, Georgia, at a time and place where there was little knowledge of Arabic.”

    “The allegation has been brought before a number of senior Muslim clerics in the Middle East who researched it in detail and refuted the rumor outright,” the company says, and its Web site links to a ruling in 2000 by the top cleric in Sunni Islam, the grand mufti of Al-Azhar, Egypt.

    Two years earlier, the owner of Walls ice cream, Unilever, was forced to scrap a new logo for use in the Middle East after Muslims in Gulf states said the symbol – a pair of intertwining red and yellow hearts – looked like the word “Allah” in Arabic, when viewed upside down and backwards.

    In 1997, Nike pulled more than 38,000 pairs of basketball shoes after the Council on American-Islamic Relations said the logo – the word “air” in flame-like lettering – looked like “Allah” in Arabic, again, when viewed from a certain angle.

    Nike also launched a program of “sensitivity training on Islam” and donated a children’s playground to an Islamic center in Falls Church, Va. In return, CAIR pledged to urge Islamic organizations and governments worldwide to cancel any planned boycotts of Nike.

    And in 1994, Chanel designer Karl Lagerfeld designed a dress incorporating an embroidered pattern copied from Arabic lettering on India’s Taj Mahal monument. He was unaware that the lettering included the phrase “They are the ones who found guidance,” which appears a number of times in the Koran.

    After wearing the dress on a Paris catwalk, German model Claudia Schiffer received death threats, prompting her mother to make a public plea for her safety. An Indonesian clerics’ body also called for a boycott of Chanel.

    Lagerfeld apologized, burned the garments, and said he would destroy all photographs and negatives of the dress.
    Muslims already damage private property, intimidate business people, and blow themselves and countless innocents up over various issues. How much more could they do if someone decided to blow them off over the soccer balls?

    CNS
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    The irony is that the manufacturer of the soccer balls was trying to show the international appeal of the sport by displaying various national flags on the merchandise. They were trying to be inclusive of all.
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  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    The irony is that the manufacturer of the soccer balls was trying to show the international appeal of the sport by displaying various national flags on the merchandise. They were trying to be inclusive of all.
    I don't think Islam thinks very highly of all that inclusivity stuff. They just got through stoning a 13 year old rape victim to death. :(
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    Senior Member enslaved1's Avatar
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    Allah everywhere
    snip
    Wow. Looks like we have a tinfoil turban crowd going there. Conspiracies to disgrace Allah are everywhere!!!1111!!!!!!
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by enslaved1 View Post
    Wow. Looks like we have a tinfoil turban crowd going there. Conspiracies to disgrace Allah are everywhere!!!1111!!!!!!
    From their perspective, that's true. This issue comes up over and over again which is part of the point the article makes. It isn't Baptists or Buddhists forcing businesses to conform to religious notions. The Amish aren't protesting sporting goods or advertising logos.

    Islam is the only religion that currently has a theocracy and the only one that is actively working to create more. Every time a non-Islamic business or enterprise caters to these protests, it makes it harder to draw a line between secular and religious interests.
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  6. #6  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    The irony is that the manufacturer of the soccer balls was trying to show the international appeal of the sport by displaying various national flags on the merchandise. They were trying to be inclusive of all.
    which just goes to show how STUPID that idea really is.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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  7. #7  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I don't think Islam thinks very highly of all that inclusivity stuff. They just got through stoning a 13 year old rape victim to death. :(

    I know, that is so disgusting. Poor girl. I read some of the details, that they buried her in the ground and put a sheet over her head, while she begged for her life. I hope all the men who participated get testicular cancer, or that the women of Somalia get hold of weapons and start gunning the bastards down who do this kind of thing.

    I read where this punishment exceeded that prescribed in Sharia law-allegedly, Sharia law does not consider a 13 year old unmarried girl to be capable of adultry.
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