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  1. #11  
    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Exactly. They need to find ways to make stores comply with the rules. If a store like WalMart or Meijer can program their registers to prompt for a birthdate to sell alcohol, the store can also program the registers to not allow the sale of alcohol to be paid for with an EBT card. And no restaurants or bars should be able to accept the cards.

    If a store is caught breaking the rules, then they should be sanctioned and not allowed to participate for a given period of time. If these are the rules, the big stores will cooperate because they want the business.
    WIC is highly regulated so why can't EBT?
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  2. #12  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    WIC is highly regulated so why can't EBT?
    I don't know for sure. I think WIC still uses paper coupons and not an electronic card.

    I do know that SNAP/Food stamp programs are partly funded by the federal government and partly by the states. It might not be clear who is responsible to enforce it, and it may be that states don't want to drag in big companies that also donate to their re-election campaigns.
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  3. #13  
    Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    EBT cards were supposed to stop food stamp fraud. It used to be that someone had to send their kids in with food stamps to make a bunch of legal purchases and then come in with all the change to buy cigarettes or booze. They at least had to put some thought into it.

    I don't think that they can buy cigarettes with the EBT cards, but I know the stores are not preventing them from buying alcohol with them. A bar should not be able to accept the cards, titty bar or regular bar. I don't think people should be able to use them in restaurants, it's too expensive to eat out. $20 of food from WalMart will go a lot further than $20 of food from McDonalds.
    I agree.

    I remember in the Midwest when the paper food stamps had to be picked up from a currency exchange (or similar location) due to the theft of the stamps out of people's mailboxes and then of course people claiming they were stolen when they were not.
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  4. #14  
    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I don't know for sure. I think WIC still uses paper coupons and not an electronic card.

    I do know that SNAP/Food stamp programs are partly funded by the federal government and partly by the states. It might not be clear who is responsible to enforce it, and it may be that states don't want to drag in big companies that also donate to their re-election campaigns.
    Food stamps weren't regulated even when they were paper. WIC has always been regulated. We get WIC for our 2 foster babies and they're specific on what we can get for them. They actually spell it out. EBT should be the same way with candy and junk being prohibited.
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  5. #15  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Food stamps weren't regulated even when they were paper. WIC has always been regulated. We get WIC for our 2 foster babies and they're specific on what we can get for them. They actually spell it out. EBT should be the same way with candy and junk being prohibited.
    I don't know about each state's practices with WIC. I know in the area I work, the county administers it-they determine eligibility and register people. I think that your point about it only being used for very specific items makes it easier to enforce the rules. An EBT covers cleaning supplies and other household necessities in addition to food, which might make it a little more difficult to enforce the rules at the checkout level. Still, we live in an age in which that should still be possible.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Banacek's Avatar
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    In June 2014, Mother Jones reported that "Overall, 18 percent of all food benefits money is spent at Walmart," and that Walmart had submitted a statement to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission stating,

    Our business operations are subject to numerous risks, factors, and uncertainties, domestically and internationally, which are outside our control. These factors include... changes in the amount of payments made under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Plan and other public assistance plans, [and] changes in the eligibility requirements of public assistance plans.

    Companies that have lobbied on behalf of SNAP include PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, and the grocery chain Kroger. Kraft Foods, which receives "One-sixth [of its] revenues ... from food stamp purchases" also opposes food stamp cuts
    As a Senator, Dole became a staunch supporter of the program, after he worked with George McGovern to produce a bipartisan solution to two of the main problems associated with food stamps: cumbersome purchase requirements and lax eligibility standards. Dole told Congress regarding the new provisions, “I am confident that this bill eliminates the greedy and feeds the needy.” The law was intended to strengthen the agricultural economy and provide improved levels of nutrition among low-income households; however, the practical purpose was to bring the pilot FSP under congressional control and to enact the regulations into law.
    Didn't Bob Dolt run for president once ?

    A small part of the Food Stamp Act of 1977:

    The integrity provisions of the new program included fraud disqualifications, enhanced Federal funding for States' anti-fraud activities, and financial incentives for low error rates.


    Connecticut's fraud level dropped (though it was still higher than most states) because it changed the amount of money that somebody stole before it was considered a fraud !

    In March 2012, the USDA published its fifth report in a series of periodic analyses to estimate the extent of trafficking in SNAP; that is, selling or otherwise converting SNAP benefits for cash payouts. Although trafficking does not increase costs to the Federal Government,[55][56][57] it diverts benefits from their intended purpose of helping low-income families access a nutritious diet. The FNS aggressively acts to control trafficking by using SNAP purchase data to identify suspicious transaction patterns, conducting undercover investigations, and collaborating with other investigative agencies.



    Trafficking diverted an estimated one cent of each SNAP dollar ($330 million annually) from SNAP benefits between 2006 and 2008. Trafficking has declined over time from nearly 4 percent in the 1990s. About 8.2 percent of all stores trafficked from 2006 to 2008 compared to the 10.5 percent of SNAP authorized stores involved in trafficking in 2011. A variety of store characteristics and settings were related to the level of trafficking. Although large stores accounted for 87.3 percent of all SNAP redemptions, they only accounted for about 5.4 percent of trafficking redemptions. Trafficking was much less likely to occur among publicly owned than privately owned stores and was much less likely among stores in areas with less poverty rather than more.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supple...stance_Program
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