Thread: Seared Ahi tuna

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  1. #1 Seared Ahi tuna 
    HR Corporate Scum patriot45's Avatar
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    Not hard at all to make yourself. Tuna is not cheap but doing it at home is cheaper than a restaurant.

    Ingredients
    2 (6-8 ounce) ahi tuna steaks (3/4 of an inch thick)
    2 Tbsp dark sesame oil
    2 Tbsp soy sauce (or 2 teaspoons of wheat-free tamari for gluten-free option)
    1 Tbsp of grated fresh ginger
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 green onion (scallion) thinly sliced (a few slices reserved for garnish)
    1 teaspoon lime juice

    Note* I didnt have scallions.
    Crushed sesame seeds and fresh ground pepper

    Method
    1 Mix the marinade ingredients together and coat the tuna steaks with the marinade, cover tightly, and refrigerate for at least an hour.

    1a. Roll the tuna edgewise in the crushed sesame and pepper.

    2 Heat a non-stick skillet over medium high to high heat. When the pan is hot, sear them for a minute to a minute and a half on each side ( even a little longer if you want the tuna less rare .)

    3 Remove from pan and slice into 1/4-inch thick slices. We served it with some wasabi, Thai chile sauce and soy sauce.

    Marinated, coated and searing!


    Mmmmm!

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  2. #2  
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    Just the edges? You could coat the top & bottom in sesame & pepper as well. The roasted sesame flavor is great.

    Looks a bit overcooked to me :D
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  3. #3  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by patriot45 View Post
    Not hard at all to make yourself. Tuna is not cheap but doing it at home is cheaper than a restaurant.

    Ingredients
    2 (6-8 ounce) ahi tuna steaks (3/4 of an inch thick)
    2 Tbsp dark sesame oil
    2 Tbsp soy sauce (or 2 teaspoons of wheat-free tamari for gluten-free option)
    1 Tbsp of grated fresh ginger
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 green onion (scallion) thinly sliced (a few slices reserved for garnish)
    1 teaspoon lime juice

    Note* I didnt have scallions.
    Crushed sesame seeds and fresh ground pepper

    Method
    1 Mix the marinade ingredients together and coat the tuna steaks with the marinade, cover tightly, and refrigerate for at least an hour.

    1a. Roll the tuna edgewise in the crushed sesame and pepper.

    2 Heat a non-stick skillet over medium high to high heat. When the pan is hot, sear them for a minute to a minute and a half on each side ( even a little longer if you want the tuna less rare .)

    3 Remove from pan and slice into 1/4-inch thick slices. We served it with some wasabi, Thai chile sauce and soy sauce.

    Marinated, coated and searing!


    Mmmmm!

    Oww,you are killing me,That looks great .The only thing missing is the hot Wasabbi, pickled ginger A bowl of Miso soup and about six bottles of Kirin beer ,OPs sorry I didn't see the Wasabi paste
    Last edited by megimoo; 05-29-2008 at 05:53 PM.
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  4. #4  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Pickled Ginger (Gari or Shoga),Wasabia japonica

    In a sushi bar, you will be given a small heap of pickled ginger as well as a small glob of wasabi. The purpose of the wasabi is to mix with soy sauce in the small dish that included with your place setting. (Start with small amounts of the wasabi, mix it with the soy sauce,(Wasabi-joyu). and sample.

    Repeat until it tastes more like the wasabi than the soy sauce, or until it tastes "right" to you.) The ginger is used to cleanse the palate between bites of sushi. It does not take a lot of the ginger to cleanse the palate, so the small pile should be enough for several rolls. If you consume all of either, by all means ask the sushi chef for more.

    People have asked if the ginger root in grocery stores is the same ginger that is pickled for sushi. It is, and up until now I have recommended that you buy it in jars at Asian markets. I recently found a recipe for making your own pickled ginger, and will share that with you.

    8 oz. (250 g) ginger root
    3 fl oz (90 ml) rice vinegar
    2 Tablespoons mirin *
    2 Tablespoons sake **
    5 teaspoons sugar
    mirin is a very sweet rice wine used only for cooking. You can substitute a teaspoon of sugar for a Tablespoon of mirin, or an equal amount of sake.
    sake is a rice wine that often accompanies sushi. Dry sherry is a potential but inferior substitute.
    Scrub the ginger under running water as you would a potato for baking. Blanch in boiling water for one minute and drain.Combine mirin, sake, and sugar in a small pan. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Cool.
    Place the ginger into a sterilized jar and pour the cooled vinegar over the ginger. Cover and keep 3-4 days before using. Will keep refrigerated for up to one month.The pale pink color develops as it ages, however, you might want to add a small amount of red food coloring.[/

    Celebrating the authenticity of Wasabia japonica
    Consumers of sushi know wasabi, or at least think they do... The truth is, most so called wasabi isn't, and the majority of products claiming to contain wasabi don't. What typically passes for "wasabi" in most establishments is a mixture of horseradish, food coloring, mustard, corn starch and sadly, is a mere shadow of the real deal. You may already know that. Maybe you're interested in where organic wasabi grows and how it serves up such unique thrills to our tastebuds, or perhaps you've heard of wasabi's promising health benefits that have the scientific world buzzing...
    Like exposure to fine wines, one taste of Real Wasab may leave you forever dissatisfied with "faux wasabi" imitations.
    Last edited by megimoo; 05-29-2008 at 08:08 PM.
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  5. #5  
    HR Corporate Scum patriot45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biccat View Post
    Just the edges? You could coat the top & bottom in sesame & pepper as well. The roasted sesame flavor is great.

    Looks a bit overcooked to me :D
    Dang, everyones a critic!:D
    The tuna started out dark but it passed the smell test when I bought it. I think coating it all around would end up with burnt sesame seeds, we just sprinkled some seeds down on the plate under the tuna.

    Dark tuna

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  6. #6  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by patriot45 View Post
    Dang, everyones a critic!:D
    The tuna started out dark but it passed the smell test when I bought it. I think coating it all around would end up with burnt sesame seeds, we just sprinkled some seeds down on the plate under the tuna.

    Dark tuna

    Sorry didn't mean to be critical but you got me all excited for one of my favorite foods .

    If you are open for suggestions only buy sushi grade tuna all in one piece and roll in sesame seeds all around then slice !
    Another way to serve it is with Japanese sushi rice and if you like make sashimi not sushi.

    If you really enjoy Japanese style foods and have the time and patience try making your own susi rice and giri you may decide, after a while , to entertain Japanese style with a full Japanese meal minus Gasha unless you can convince your wife to go along with you !
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by patriot45 View Post
    Dang, everyones a critic!:D
    The tuna started out dark but it passed the smell test when I bought it. I think coating it all around would end up with burnt sesame seeds, we just sprinkled some seeds down on the plate under the tuna.

    Dark tuna

    Looks delicious just like that.

    When I cook tuna, I like to have toasted sesame seeds. I think it adds a ton of flavor. If you have a grill, that's the preferred way to cook the steaks, because then burnt seeds fall into the fire.

    I was only half kidding about it being overcooked. Raw or barely seared is the best way to enjoy such a fish. :D
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member DarkScribe's Avatar
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    Pat,

    That looks yummy, man. Of course, I'm the only one in the house that likes fish (not counting the stuff in a can) and usually can only cook it when I am by myself.
    "The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." H.P. Lovecraft in Supernatural Horror in Literature
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  9. #9  
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkScribe View Post
    Pat,

    That looks yummy, man. Of course, I'm the only one in the house that likes fish (not counting the stuff in a can) and usually can only cook it when I am by myself.
    That looks delicious. Had some ahi tuna at a little recipe in Sanibel that was excellent. It was such a large portion that just ordering the appetizer was more than enough for the main meal. I'll post the name when I think of it.
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