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  1. #1 Solar panel boom causes concerns for firefighters 
    Senior Member Banacek's Avatar
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    In 2016, solar energy raked in $447 million in South Carolina, according to the Clean Energy Census.

    In the Upstate more than 750 installations of solar panels have gone in, and business is booming.

    Sunstore Solar has more than doubled business in the past year, even expanding to a new building. Growth in the residential sector is spreading in thanks to incentive programs for solar panels and word of the economic benefits. Owner Bruce Wood has reduced his monthly power bill to 8 dollars.

    But as this boom continues, firefighters are seeing the concerns. The South Carolina Fire Academy has even added an online training course about solar panels. A class that the Boiling Springs Fire District has made mandatory for their firefighters.

    Fire Marshal Tony Barnett is surveying local commercial businesses with solar panels, to make sure they’re prepared. Knowing the layout of the panels and where the power shut off switches are could mean seconds to these firefighters.

    “It limits your ability to ventilate a roof vertically, because most of your roof structure is covered by the panels,” said Barnett. Although lightweight, the panels also add pressure during a fire with a compromised structure
    http://wspa.com/2017/07/05/solar-pan...-firefighters/
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I support the idea of solar power as a backup to conventional energy, it helps lower bills for people. But really, if this is going to be part of construction of new houses, there needs to be more information available for everyone, including homeowners, banks, and other parties, so that consumers can make informed choices. Solar has been around a while, but it was always on the fringe of things. It's mainstream now, so there needs to be some standards.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Angry Old White Man's Avatar
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    Yeah this is what I need, a bunch of toxic batteries to burn and suffocate me if the fire don't get me first.
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  4. #4  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I support the idea of solar power as a backup to conventional energy, it helps lower bills for people. But really, if this is going to be part of construction of new houses, there needs to be more information available for everyone, including homeowners, banks, and other parties, so that consumers can make informed choices. Solar has been around a while, but it was always on the fringe of things. It's mainstream now, so there needs to be some standards.
    Maybe we could go with wind up spring powered generators.

    Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil;
    Who substitute darkness for light and light for darkness;
    Who substitute bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!
    21 Woe to those who are wise in their own eyes
    And clever in their own sight! Isaiah 5:20-21 NASB

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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Banacek's Avatar
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    A thought occurred to me. ( a rarity)

    If someone has their house "solarized" and lives in an area that, in the past, has been hit with large hail stones, does homeowners insurance cover that? Would a special policy rider be needed?

    Anyone with insurance expertise have an answer ?
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member cadillac shark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banacek View Post
    A thought occurred to me. ( a rarity)

    If someone has their house "solarized" and lives in an area that, in the past, has been hit with large hail stones, does homeowners insurance cover that? Would a special policy rider be needed?

    Anyone with insurance expertise have an answer ?
    I don't have expertise, but I know panels have warranties which would go a good distance to acting as 'insurance'.

    Then your home-policy takes over.

    You have to tell your insurance company you're thinking of installing them.
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Banacek's Avatar
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    Thanks Cadillac. I didn't think about the notifying your insurance angle
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