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  1. #11  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I can live without popcorn. But seriously, I've been eating a lot of corn on the cob because it is late summer and it's all local (so as fresh as it gets). There doesn't appear to be any shortages at Meijer or Nino Salvaggio's, the placed I buy groceries.
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  2. #12  
    Festivus Moderator ralph wiggum's Avatar
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    Is is possible to OD on sweet corn? Since I reside in the Midwest, have had it for dinner about 4 times a week. Cook far more than necessary, and freeze it for the winter.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member SVPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    It grows and thrives here in Oklahoma at +100 temperatures.
    Likewise in CA's Central Valley where summer high temps are usually 90-105. My Dad, through the years, grew both the corn used to feed cattle and the corn used to make tortillas. At one restaurant in town he brought the corn in the back door in sacks and it went out the front door as tamales, enchiladas, etc.. The grasses from which modern corn developed were native to Central America, where it get quite hot.
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  4. #14  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph wiggum View Post
    Is is possible to OD on sweet corn? Since I reside in the Midwest, have had it for dinner about 4 times a week. Cook far more than necessary, and freeze it for the winter.
    Sweet corn leaves you in pretty much the same condition as it enters so I doubt you would have much accumulation other than butter.
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  5. #15  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVPete View Post
    Likewise in CA's Central Valley where summer high temps are usually 90-105. My Dad, through the years, grew both the corn used to feed cattle and the corn used to make tortillas. At one restaurant in town he brought the corn in the back door in sacks and it went out the front door as tamales, enchiladas, etc.. The grasses from which modern corn developed were native to Central America, where it get quite hot.
    I was amazed by this. I'm from Minnesota a heavy corn growing region with a climate much cooler than Oklahoma, when I moved here I had no idea they could grow corn almost as well. It's all about nitrogen and water.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Angry Old White Man's Avatar
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    Years ago I owned a house about four miles down the highway from where I now live and there was 500 acres across the street from my little house, there was corn every year while I lived there for 11 years and I had a nice toe sack in my closet. Just about wore that sack out from night time walks.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member SVPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    I was amazed by this. I'm from Minnesota a heavy corn growing region with a climate much cooler than Oklahoma, when I moved here I had no idea they could grow corn almost as well. It's all about nitrogen and water.
    And length of the growing season. I suspect varieties grown in MN might mature faster than those grown farther south. Which brings up another point. While various plants might evolve very slowly in the wild, domesticated plants used for food are actively bred and hybridized for various desired characteristics, climate included. This whole kerfuffle is Paul-Ehrlich-style Enviro-alarmism.
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  8. #18  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVPete View Post
    And length of the growing season. I suspect varieties grown in MN might mature faster than those grown farther south. Which brings up another point. While various plants might evolve very slowly in the wild, domesticated plants used for food are actively bred and hybridized for various desired characteristics, climate included. This whole kerfuffle is Paul-Ehrlich-style Enviro-alarmism.
    In Oklahoma you can grow a crop of corn reseed and get another crop of soybeans in the same season, Minnesota grew the long season 100+ day corn but only got a single crop. I would still bet there are differences other than time to maturation in the seed used, probably bred for heat and different insect resistance.
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  9. #19  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    In Oklahoma you can grow a crop of corn reseed and get another crop of soybeans in the same season, Minnesota grew the long season 100+ day corn but only got a single crop. I would still bet there are differences other than time to maturation in the seed used, probably bred for heat and different insect resistance.
    The stuff was domesticated in Mexico, so heat sensitivity isn't really part of its basic gene structure. It does unfortunately have a very narrow genetic profile, making it a crop that would be unusually susceptible to pandemic disease compared to other grains, but that potential problem has yet to materialize as a real-world issue.
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  10. #20  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph wiggum View Post
    Is is possible to OD on sweet corn? Since I reside in the Midwest, have had it for dinner about 4 times a week. Cook far more than necessary, and freeze it for the winter.

    Not if you are basically healthy. My sister has Crohn's, so she has to go easy on corn. Even healthy people don't digest all the corn, we all know that. It can tear up someone with digestive problems badly.
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