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  1. #11  
    Senior Member SVPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    It works well in Europe. CA has a lot of seismic activity, an earthquake that affected a 200 mph train would have major disaster potential. Or it would make a good Irwin Allen movie plot. Either way.
    The southern end of the boondoggle would be in LA. You cannot head north from LA without crossing several major fault lines. And the northern end is the SF Bay Area. Nuff said?
    Facts don't matter to DUpipo.

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  2. #12  
    Senior Member SVPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zathras View Post
    Man I can't wait for the State of California starts running high speed rail. Nothing bad will happen with that.

    Yeah, just look at the current ongoing year-long debacle with the new BART cars.
    Facts don't matter to DUpipo.

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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVPete View Post
    Yeah, just look at the current ongoing year-long debacle with the new BART cars.
    Well, that's what happens when you have to be different than every other subway system in the world and use a different gauge (width between the wheels) and have to have your train cars specially made to fit your tracks.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zathras View Post
    Well, that's what happens when you have to be different than every other subway system in the world and use a different gauge (width between the wheels) and have to have your train cars specially made to fit your tracks.
    What are they? Most narrow gauge in the US has been three-foot, a few Canadian and other Empire systems have been three-foot-six-inch, but in Europe the standard for them is generally a meter, especially for transit railways (Which is really, really close to the three-six but just enough wider to cause a wreck if you ran the Imperial stuff on a Euro track). I'm fairly sure you'd have to go for a Euro supplier to get the meter gauge rolling stock off the shelf, or pay through the nose for a domestic supplier to custom produce it.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member SVPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbAss Tanker View Post
    What are they? Most narrow gauge in the US has been three-foot, a few Canadian and other Empire systems have been three-foot-six-inch, but in Europe the standard for them is generally a meter, especially for transit railways (Which is really, really close to the three-six but just enough wider to cause a wreck if you ran the Imperial stuff on a Euro track). I'm fairly sure you'd have to go for a Euro supplier to get the meter gauge rolling stock off the shelf, or pay through the nose for a domestic supplier to custom produce it.
    Standard gauge railroad is 4' 8.5". The gauge for BART is 5'6".
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVPete View Post
    That's ate up. No place uses that, and standard off-the-shelf running gear components can't be sized up that far, so everything from the axles to the bolsters would have to be custom-made and therefore twice as expensive. There are two standard gauges, 4'-8.5" everywhere American, English, or French engineers built the track, and 5' anywhere Russian engineers built it. I think ONE of the major railways in Oz was broad gauge, but nobody else has used anything over 5' since Victorian days when when Brunnell's Great Western was converted to standard gauge.
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  7. #17  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbAss Tanker View Post
    That's ate up. No place uses that, and standard off-the-shelf running gear components can't be sized up that far, so everything from the axles to the bolsters would have to be custom-made and therefore twice as expensive. There are two standard gauges, 4'-8.5" everywhere American, English, or French engineers built the track, and 5' anywhere Russian engineers built it. I think ONE of the major railways in Oz was broad gauge, but nobody else has used anything over 5' since Victorian days when when Brunnell's Great Western was converted to standard gauge.
    Put wider wheels and longer axles on them, leave the undercarriage the way it is.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Put wider wheels and longer axles on them, leave the undercarriage the way it is.
    It isn't that simple. Transit car trucks may have internal frames, but the bolsters set the distance between truck frames and axles are generally not straight cylinders, they are forgings that swell outward to the inside diameter of the wheel hubs and the bearing surface which are both machined to spec (The bearing surface outside the wheels for outside frames, inside the wheels for inside frames, and the two diameters are not usually the same), of course the standard forgings have as little excess metal on those diameters as possible to reduce the cost of finish machining. These wheelsets would be almost a foot wider than standard gauge, so it'll call for extra-long custom axles and bolsters (The part that sets the gauge of the frames, and on which the car pivots). All the mounting hardware for the traction motors and the parts of the brake gear that spans the width of the truck will also have to be custom-made, not only now, but in the outyears when rebuilds and repairs come up.

    It's kinda comparable to you deciding you want dualies on the front end of your truck...you can do it, but it costs a whole lot more than going stock and there isn't any sane reason to do it.
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