Thread: American Pie

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  1. #1 American Pie 
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    For those of us who grew up in the 50’s and 60’s this is a great piece with some very poignant moments in the history of those times. And for those of you who did not it’s a taste of what you missed!"American Pie" was the name of the plane that Buddy Holly, Richie Valenz and The Big Bopperwent down in.I have listened to the words to American Pie for many years and I thought I understoodlots of what was beingsung. I didn’t!
    However, when the words are put together with pictures and film clips the song takes on a new meaning.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhX3...ature=youtu.be
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    Senior Member Dlr Pyro's Avatar
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    alot of history in that song.

    Another song that chronicles 20th century history is "We didn't start the fire" by Billy Joel.

    "People who think they know it all, are annoying to those of us who really do".... Pyro Bob

    "Even if Trump didn't pay Russian hookers to pee on one another to defile a bed the Obamas once slept on it sounds like something he would do and that's all that matters." DemocratSinceBirth, Wed Jan 11, 2017, 09:32 AM

    "Enemy. The word you are looking for is enemy. When the ideals of someone are antithetical to yours, you can say the word "enemy". DUmmy ret5hd Fri Aug 24, 2018, 05:10 PM
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Cowboy View Post
    For those of us who grew up in the 50’s and 60’s this is a great piece with some very poignant moments in the history of those times.

    However, when the words are put together with pictures and film clips the song takes on a new meaning.
    This is very interesting until the end, when the photos don't quite go (9/11, Sinatra, Lennon before his death at 40, etc.) That is because, whether the video creator realizes it or not, Don McLean was documenting both a loss of innocence and the rising overt presence of the occult in music. The music of the 50s was innocent, dance music, about teen romance in an age where marriage quickly followed. People went to church, believed in God and love--and their government. The drug problem was a decade away.

    If you look carefully at the images of the 60's rock (Beatles, Stones, Altamont, the Byrds, etc.) you will see the rising themes of drugs and the occult in the new music. You also see the themes of violence, war, and assassination. along with the public protest that accompanied all of it. The traumas of losing three rock 'n roll idols and a youthful president are compared and assimilated inside each other: each traumatic death adds to the overall shock of the nation.

    Into a shocked nation, a music that promotes loveless sex, drugs, and the occult becomes the soundtrack for the numbed. Charles Manson is THE great symbol of this music: he knew all the players in the LA music scene and was trying to shop his songs around. His career ended in the hideously violent deaths of people in and around the scene. The violence, drugs, and the occult all converge in Manson. They also reach a peak with the Rolling Stones at Altamont, which seems to have been a planned killing meant to look like Hell's Angels out of control. Mick Jagger plays at the devil while others do the demon's dirty work.

    The young generation, meanwhile, becomes lost in space, influenced by the violence, the bad music, the drugs, and the rising counter culture. Not all of them, of course. The working classes were still working for the most part, while the college kids dropped out, did drugs, and had kids out of wedlock to the horror of their parent. It was the beginning of the radicalization of the bourgeoisie that Saul Alinksy was so desiring. The professors (and Lennon) taught Marx and 19th century Romantic-era poetry. The affluent college kids left the innocent dance music behind, attracked by the pseudo-poetry and Marxist themes of folk music. They stayed for the switch to electric guitar (Bob Dylan, the Jester--who was aping the working class look and had "a voice that came from you and me") and to the occult non-dance music (Sargent Pepper, an album drenched in Alistair Crowley references).

    The generation is lost. And, at the end, America is lost. Even God is lost. The Father, Son and Holy Ghost are gone.

    There is an eccentric, rather ambling book by Dave McGowan about the LA scene during this era: Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon. It started out as a series of internet posts, so it doesn't follow a straightforward path. But it is documented. In the end, according to McGowan, the music scene and the drugs that went with it, were a product of intelligence agencies: most of the big LA rock scene names of this era were connected to military intelligence or the CIA. One surprising name is Jim Morrison, whose father, Admiral George Stephen Morrison was the commander of US Naval forces in the Pacific during the Gulf of Tonkin--an attack that never happened. The Navy was trying to create a false flag as an excuse to go into Vietnam, but the North Vietnamese didn't bite. In the end, a false report was given to Congress about an attack that never happened.

    McGowan has written on other seemingly non-related topics as serial killers and fascism. But they all lead back to the deliberate manipulation of the American public by the largely unseen hand of intelligence agencies: from Operation Paperclip that put actual Nazis into the US government agencies; Operation Mockingbird, the CIA infiltration of journalism, and Operation Northwoods, which seems to have been an early blueprint for 9/11.

    McGowan believes that the entire counterculture was a planned and implemented operation, from Timothy Leary (a known CIA asset now) who handed out LSD and told the young to "drop out" to the musicians with their many connections to the military industrial complex, to the assassins of the Kennedys, and MLK.

    I don't know if I'd go as far as McGowan did, but Don McLean was, I believe, talking in riddles about a popular culture industry drenched in the occult, drugs, meaningless sex, and death.
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  4. #4  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dlr Pyro View Post
    alot of history in that song.

    Another song that chronicles 20th century history is "We didn't start the fire" by Billy Joel.
    What the vid doesn’t mention is what drove Joel to write it. He hated to sing it and thought it had the worst melody of anything he wrote. Some fanboy told him nothing ever happened in the ‘50’s.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    A man is but a product of his thoughts. What he thinks, he becomes. Gandhi
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