Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1 Expedition locates USS Lexington 
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I came to Texas as soon as I could
    Posts
    16,289
    The Navy Times
    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...-wwii-carrier/

    The aircraft carrier USS Lexington (CV-2) was struck by multiple Japanese torpedoes and bombs on May 8, 1942, during the Battle of the Coral Sea, but it wasn’t until a secondary explosion crippled the vessel that the ship’s commanding officer gave the call to abandon ship.

    More than 200 Lexington sailors were killed in the fight, which marked the first ever carrier vs. carrier battle — one that dealt the imperial forces of Emperor Hirohito their first major blow of World War II.

    Nearby U.S. ships rescued 2,770 of the carrier’s remaining sailors, to include the captain’s dog, Wags.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    . If you ain't havin' fun, it's your own damn fault
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member Zathras's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    San Jose, California
    Posts
    7,625
    Quote Originally Posted by Retread View Post
    The Navy Times
    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...-wwii-carrier/

    The aircraft carrier USS Lexington (CV-2) was struck by multiple Japanese torpedoes and bombs on May 8, 1942, during the Battle of the Coral Sea, but it wasn’t until a secondary explosion crippled the vessel that the ship’s commanding officer gave the call to abandon ship.

    More than 200 Lexington sailors were killed in the fight, which marked the first ever carrier vs. carrier battle — one that dealt the imperial forces of Emperor Hirohito their first major blow of World War II.

    Nearby U.S. ships rescued 2,770 of the carrier’s remaining sailors, to include the captain’s dog, Wags.
    This is the same group that found USS Indianapolis late last year. For being underwater since mid 1942, the wreckage looks in fantastic shape. That aircraft in the video, a TBD Devastator from the looks of it, appears to be in great condition. It's probably because of the depth of where the wreck is located.
    Solve a man's problem with violence and help him for a day. Teach a man how to solve his problems with violence, help him for a lifetime - Belkar Bitterleaf

    Liberalism is what the stupid think is smart.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Power CUer SVPete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    10,253
    Somehow I skillfully missed this thread.

    Coral Sea was the first time the USN was able to go toe-to-toe with a similar IJN force and come away on somewhat equal terms. The USN lost CV-2, Lexington, and CV-5, Yorktown suffered significant damage. The IJN lost the new light carrier Shoho and fleet carrier Shokaku was significantly damaged. In addition, the air groups of Shokaku and sister Zuikaku suffered significant losses. The planned invasion of Port Moresby, New Guinea turned back.

    The aftermath was, perhaps, even more significant, with Midway in the offing. On the USN side, Yorktown and the rest of the Task Force was able to save many/most of Lex's aviators, so that while Lex and York suffered losses to their air groups, the two air groups could be combined. Yorktown got back to PH and was sufficiently repaired that she was able to fight at Midway. On the IJN side, their original plans for Midway had all six carriers of their Mobile Force attacking Midway. The damage to Shokaku precluded her participation, and IJN doctrine did not provide for Sho's and Zui's air groups to be combined, so Zuikaku also was not at Midway.

    In the event, four IJN carriers went to Midway in the Mobile Force - Akagi, Kaga, Hiryo, and Soryu - and all four were sunk, with the USN losing Yorktown (a submarine inflicted the fatal hit). A fifth IJN carrier might have altered the two sides' respective losses. Japan would have gotten buried anyway, since their strategy to destroy US civilian morale was not going to succeed. But had the USN lost Enterprise or Hornet as well as Yorktown that probably would have delayed the Solomon Islands campaign by 6-12 months, as well as the rest of the progress of the war.
    Facts don't matter to DUpipo.

    BIG CHEETO Is Watching You!

    Note to "Warpy" and "shockey80": I voted for Donald Trump! I would do so again!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Power CUer SVPete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    10,253
    Some miscellaneous background stuff:

    The very first USN launch of an airplane from a ship was off a platform built on the obsolescent armored cruiser, USS Pennsylvania during winter 1911-1912. The USN's first aircraft carrier, CV-1, was a converted collier, USS Jupiter, renamed USS Langley (1920). Being a converted auxilliary, Langley was relative slow, just 15 knots. She was principally used for pilot training, and with the dawn of monoplanes coming into use she was converted into a seaplane tender in 1936. She was sunk in February, 1942 while on a mission to deliver aircraft to Java.

    CV-2, Lexington, and CV-3, Saratoga began life being built to be the first of four battle cruisers. The 1923 Washington Naval Treaty forbade construction of new battleships and battle cruisers, while allowing limited building of new aircraft carriers. So Lex and Sara were converted during construction to carriers. The IJN started to do the same with their incomplete battlecruisers, Amagi and Akagi. Amagi was damaged beyond repair during the 1923 Tokyo earthquake, so Akagi was completed as a carrier, and the incomplete battleship Kaga was completed as a carrier.

    For nearly 7 years Langley, Lexington, and Saratoga were the USN's carriers on which all the training of aviators and developing handling processes happened. The USN's first purpose-designed aircraft carrier was USS Ranger, CV-4. Ranger was about a third of the displacement of Lex and Sara, and some 5 knots slower. At least partly due to her speed, Ranger was deemed unsuitable for fleet operations in the Pacific when war came.

    After Ranger came the Yorktown class of carriers: Yorktown, CV-5; Enterprise, CV-6; Hornet, CV-8. These were half the displacement of Lex and Sara, but of similar speed and aircraft capacity. CV-7 was USS Wasp, similar in size and speed to Ranger (though Wasp carried a few more aircraft and had better aircraft handling than Ranger).

    Of these seven CVs that went to war, just Saratoga, Ranger (which served almost entirely in the Atlantic), and Enterprise survived the war. These seven CVs held the line in 1942 and early 1943 until the flood of Essex class carriers buried the IJN.

    Back to Coral Sea ... the Japanese plan was to advance on Australia, to make shipping supplies to Australia difficult and dangerous. Part of the plan was to occupy islands in the souther Solomon Islands. This was successful, and eventually led to the Guadalcanal Campaign, 3 or 4 months later. The other, larger part was an invasion of Port Moresby, New Guinea. The Battle of Coral Seafrustrated that plan by sinking or damaging a significant part of the support for that invasion.

    Lexington and Saratoga were conversions, adaptations of something designed for one purpose to be used for another. Lex and Sara were also pretty much the first of their kind for the USN. They took carrier aviation from fragile biplanes into the era of faster and sturdier monoplanes, creating handling and fighting doctrine and procedures as they went along. They made up damage control procedures and facilities as they went along too, as the relatively exposed gasoline tanks and fuel lines and exposed ordinance handling of a carrier were unique and very different from a battleship's or cruiser's protected fuel bunkers and fuel lines and protected magazines and shell and powder handling hoists. That's a rather long way of saying that the handling and damage control equipment, processes, and procedures on Lex and Sara were not as robust as what the Yorktown and Essex class CVs had.

    The same was true, by the way, for Akagi and Kaga in comparison to Shokaku and Zuikaku (built in the mid-late 30s, like the Yorktown class CVs).
    Facts don't matter to DUpipo.

    BIG CHEETO Is Watching You!

    Note to "Warpy" and "shockey80": I voted for Donald Trump! I would do so again!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    724
    Paul Allen, co founder of MS, net worth about $21 BILLION. Hat off to him, you hear little except when he finds a sunken WWII US ship, he is not out to change the US, does not appear to be some EXTREME LEFT like Bezos and Zuckerberg, who I think are a true danger to America...
    Don
    Major US Army Infantry (RET)
    Hill Country of Texas

    Conservative, Constitutionalist, Capitalist, Christian. I speak: John Wayne, Johnny Cash and John Deere...
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •