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  1. #1 Murder the REAL FACTS by John Lott 
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    51% Of Murders In The U.S. Come From Just 2% Of The Counties

    The Distribution of Murders
    The United States can really be divided up into three types of places. Places where there are no murders, places where there are a few murders, and places where murders are very common.
    In 2014, the most recent year that a county level breakdown is available, 54% of counties (with 11% of the population) have no murders. 69% of counties have no more than one murder, and about 20% of the population. These counties account for only 4% of all murders in the country.
    The worst 1% of counties have 19% of the population and 37% of the murders. The worst 5% of counties contain 47% of the population and account for 68% of murders. As shown in figure 2, over half of murders occurred in only 2% of counties.
    Murders actually used to be even more concentrated. From 1977 to 2000, on average 73 percent of counties in any give year had zero murders. Possibly, this change is a result of the opioid epidemic’s spread to more rural areas. But that question is beyond the scope of this study. Lott’s book “More Guns, Less Crime” showed how dramatically counties within states vary dramatically with respect to murder and other violent crime rates.

    This is JAW DROPPING!

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-...ust-2-counties

    Don
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  2. #2  
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    As a St Louis native who sold to government accounts throughout the metro area, I've known for a long time which areas to avoid or to be super-vigilant. I survived almost 30 years in the trenches there. I'm not a bleeding heart liberal. A relative keeps saying that "no one will hurt me" as she goes to areas that I know are super dangerous. My theory is that one shouldn't tempt fate, but use their common sense.

    Our local news comes out of Mobile, Alabama now. Just watching it, Mobile seems to be a city very similar to St Louis with a high minority population. However, I don't know the neighborhoods there and confess to being afraid to go to events that seem like they'd be cool. Perhaps I'm just way too cautious, but I believe in that old song "Staying Alive".
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    The data is very clear: Liberal far left govt, high minority populations.

    1) First the far left wants and needs turmoil and mass killings to justify their far left communist policies.

    2) Minorities: This is a result of far left govt and their creation of 'Uncle Sam's Plantation' mentality. FACT is minorities live worse today that at anytime in American history. Life on a real plantation would be far better than the crushing fist of life under a communist-socialist govt.
    Don
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  4. #4  
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    I didn't even read the article and know that the #1 county is Cook county and the #2 has to be LA county. If we talking per capita, Camden County, NJ has to be up there.
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    They didn't list the counties in the article, but they had a US map with the counties with high murder rates in dark red, and lighter red for those that had a lesser number of murders. Counties that had no murders were white.

    I was surprised that most of CA, even the rural areas, is dark red. In MI, Wayne, Kent and Genesee Counties are dark red (Detroit, Flint and Grand Rapids, respectively). The suburban Detroit counties (Oakland and Macomb) were light red as was Kalamazoo, which I don't think really has that many murders. They had the Uber Driver killer, which bumped their per capita numbers up as it's not a huge county.
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  6. #6  
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    Murder Rates: An Unenviable Top 10 List of Counties

    County Health Rankings revel the top 10 counties (and independent cities) with the highest murder rates. The list includes a look at other factors, like population and median household income.

    PoliceOne used per capita homicide rates from County Health Rankings to find the top 10 most deadly counties for homicides between 2009 and 2015. The rankings also include independent cities — those that do not lay within any county’s jurisdiction — and districts, and some of those made the list of highest murder rates based on this data.

    Crime affects every community in the U.S — big or small. But to truly gauge safety in a community, looking at crime statistics per capita will paint the clearest picture of problem areas in the United States. As a nation, in 2015, the homicide rate was 4.9 per 100,000 people. This mark is up from 45-year lows of 4.5 in both 2013 and 2014, but still less than half of the record 10.2 in 1980. While the murder rate has been decreasing overall since the early ‘90s, there are still many counties and cities across the country plagued by homicides.

    The rankings show that homicide can affect areas both rural and urban, and that law enforcement officers, as well as other first responders in these areas, have to face violent situations on a daily basis.
    Further down

    Additional notes:

    •There is a clear regional divide. St. Louis is the westernmost city to make the list and Baltimore the furthest north.
    •Low-income areas are hit the hardest by this type of violent crime. With the exception of the District of Columbia, all of the top 10 have median household incomes below the national average of $53,889 (2015). Dallas County, Ala., and Phillips County, Ark., both have median household incomes less than half the national average.
    •All 10 of the cities and counties on this list have an African-American plurality or majority

    https://efficientgov.com/blog/2017/0...t-of-counties/
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    As a St Louis native who sold to government accounts throughout the metro area, I've known for a long time which areas to avoid or to be super-vigilant. I survived almost 30 years in the trenches there. I'm not a bleeding heart liberal. A relative keeps saying that "no one will hurt me" as she goes to areas that I know are super dangerous. My theory is that one shouldn't tempt fate, but use their common sense.

    Our local news comes out of Mobile, Alabama now. Just watching it, Mobile seems to be a city very similar to St Louis with a high minority population. However, I don't know the neighborhoods there and confess to being afraid to go to events that seem like they'd be cool. Perhaps I'm just way too cautious, but I believe in that old song "Staying Alive".
    Mobile itself is pretty safe, all things considered. It's really Prichard (~12 miles north of downtown) and the immediately surrounding environs that is the bad place to be in Mobile.

    I've never been the least bit uncomfortable walking around downtown Mobile at night, and the "midtown" neighborhood (just west of downtown on Government, a/k/a US90) is a pretty great neighborhood. West of there, in the Tillman's Corner area, you're just fine as well, along with pretty much anything in the general vicinity of Airport Boulevard. The eastern shore is perfectly fine. South of Tillman's Corner, one goes through Bayou la Batre, Coden, and eventually Dauphin Island, all of which are perfectly safe, even though the Bayou is relatively depressed economically.

    Generally, though, if you're going north on I-65 from downtown Mobile, just keep going until you cross the Dolly Parton bridge (so nicknamed for its ... shape, along with the red lights right at the apexes of the arches) into the next county (Baldwin?).
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  8. #8  
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    SR/SLW - Looking at the map indicates 4-5 counties on the Atlantic coast are in that top bracket. Can you say The who and the why?
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  9. #9  
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    Reminder - correlation does not mean causality.

    Houston, Dallas, Ft worth, Austin, San Antonio all show that dark, hi intensity kill zone, color. They are all high population, densely populated, Democrat controlled cities. They have strong levels of “inequality” - I.e. large factors of income differential. I cannot speak for any outside of Houston as to the ethnic make-up but caucasians are definitely a minority in Harris county.
    Which one of those is the magic trigger or is it some combination?
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