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  1. #1 Anyone feel that swords seem more honorable than guns? 
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    Because seems all someone has to do is just pull a trigger of a gun and really what is honorable about that.

    Whereas swords seem honorable,plus many warriors who used swords seem to be remembered,like the Samurai of Japan or the Medieval Knight.

    And it's a known fact that in WW2,that the Samurai were able to slash the barrels of guns with their samurai swords.
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    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Oh sure until somebody slices you up like a corned beef!
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    Senior Member FourWinds's Avatar
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    Nah, these days when I think of swords I think of neckbeards with fedoras and trench coats trying to look like anime badasses on instagram with the katana they bought at the mall.
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    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    12 gauge double barrel trumps sword, makes cool youtube also.
    "If the Bible is true why don't we have any urns or vessels that like say expires 6/15/300 BC on the bottom?"
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    A sword in the back is never honorable.
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    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Honor or dishonor is in the heart and mind of the wielder, not in the weapon itself. Samurai swords in WW2 likely killed vastly more POWs and civilians than combatant soldiers.
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    Senior Member Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hai View Post
    Because seems all someone has to do is just pull a trigger of a gun and really what is honorable about that.

    Whereas swords seem honorable,plus many warriors who used swords seem to be remembered,like the Samurai of Japan or the Medieval Knight.

    And it's a known fact that in WW2,that the Samurai were able to slash the barrels of guns with their samurai swords.
    First, the Katana cutting the barrel of WW2 firearms is a myth. If it happened, it would put put a nick in the barrel but the weapon would still be functional.

    Secondly, there were no Samurai in WW2. The Samurai were disbanded during the Meiji period and swords were prohibited to be worn in public by the Haitōrei Edict in 1876 except for certain individuals such as former samurai lords (daimyōs), the military and police.

    Third, the majority of the swords carried by Japanese officers were not the traditional Katanas carried by the Samurai. They are known as Guntō or military sword.

    Guntō (軍刀, military sword) is the name used to describe Japanese swords produced for use by the Japanese army and navy after the end of the samurai era in 1868. In the following era (Meiji period 1868–1912) samurai armour, weapons and ideals were gradually replaced with Western-influenced uniforms, weapons and tactics. Japan developed a conscription military in 1872 and the samurai lost the status they held for hundreds of years as the protectors of Japan. The migration from hand making blades, to that of machined-assisted creations was steadily increasing. Early in the production of guntō swords craftsmanship and artistic additions continued, but fell in heavy decline following Japan-wide increases in mass production. And thus guntō swords became the standard in the new military, transitioning the swords worn by the samurai class to an advancing battlefield.

    There are 3 different versions of the Guntō:

    Kyū guntō (old military sword)

    The first standard sword of the Japanese military was known as the kyū guntō (旧軍刀, old military sword). Murata Tsuneyoshi (1838–1921), a Japanese general who previously made guns, started making what was probably the first mass-produced substitute for traditionally made samurai swords. These swords are referred to as Murata-tō and they were used in both the Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905).[7] The kyū guntō was used from 1875 until 1934, and many styles closely resembled European and American swords of the time, with a wraparound hand guard (also known as a D-guard) and chrome plated scabbard (saya), the steel scabbard is said to have been introduced around 1900.

    Prior to 1945, many kyū guntō were distributed to commissioned officers to fill a demand for swords to Japan's expanding military officer classes. To distinguish individuality, wealth or craftsmanship, many swords were produced in batches as small as 1–25 to maintain the legacy of sword culture. Styles varied greatly, with inspirations drawn from swords of early periods, familial crests, and experimental artistic forms that the Meiji Restoration period had begun to introduce. Some examples have included European style silverworking, jade, cloisonné, or metalwork and paint for artistic relief.

    After the Second World War's conclusion, most produced guntō were made to resemble the traditionally cloth wrapped shin-gunto swords, but out of a solid metal casting. On later models the hilts were made of aluminum and painted to resemble the lacing (ito) on officer's shin-guntō swords. These swords will have serial numbers on their blades and are nearly always machine made. If the sword is all original, the serial numbers on the blade, tsuba, saya and all other parts should match.

    Shin guntō (new military sword)

    The Shin guntō (新軍刀, new military sword) was a weapon and symbol of rank used by the Imperial Japanese Army between the years of 1935 and 1945. During most of that period, the swords were manufactured at the Toyokawa Naval Arsenal. In response to rising nationalism within the armed forces, a new style of sword was designed for the Japanese military in 1934. The shin guntō was styled after a traditional slung tachi of the Kamakura Period (1185-1332). Officers' ranks were symbolized by coloured tassels tied to a loop at the end of the hilt. The corresponding colors were brown-red and gold for generals; brown and red for field officers; brown and blue for company or warrant officers; brown for sergeants, sergeant majors or corporals. The blades found in shin guntō ranged from modern machine made blades through contemporary traditionally manufactured blade to ancestral blades dating back hundreds of years.

    Kaiguntō (naval sword)

    Kaiguntō (海軍刀, naval sword) are the less common naval versions of the shin guntō. Some kai gunto were produced with stainless steel blades.
    Solve a man's problem with violence and help him for a day. Teach a man how to solve his problems with violence, help him for a lifetime - Belkar Bitterleaf

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    Oh, for fuks face...
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    Senior Member old dog's Avatar
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    I have one simple question for Hai: Are you advocating the use of swords for use in war or self defense for civilians?

    In war the objective is to complete the mission and survive. For civilians, the mission is survival. In either case, in the 21st century, a sword is not the best tool available.

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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FourWinds View Post
    Nah, these days when I think of swords I think of neckbeards with fedoras and trench coats trying to look like anime badasses on instagram with the katana they bought at the mall.

    LOL.

    I think of Excalibur, Braveheart and Game of Thrones when I think of swords.
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