Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 46
  1. #11  
    Power CUer
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    24,608
    Quote Originally Posted by old dog View Post
    I have one simple question for Hai: Are you advocating the use of swords for use in war or self defense for civilians?
    In that case, where can I get a good second hand sword?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #12  
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    get off my lawn
    Posts
    1,694
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    LOL.

    I think of Excalibur, Braveheart and Game of Thrones when I think of swords.
    Yup me too. i also think of total mediaval war and Skyrim when i think of swords
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #13  
    Senior Member cadillac shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    4,999
    When I think of swords, I think of swordfights 'n kickass dialogue:

    " So YOU'RE the one who's been hanging most of my friends! "
    " -For MURDERING most of MINE! "
    -The Crimson Pirate
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #14  
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    get off my lawn
    Posts
    1,694
    Quote Originally Posted by Zathras View Post
    First, the Katana cutting the barrel of WW2 firearms is a myth. If it happened, it would put put a nick in the barrel but the weapon would still be functional.

    Secondly, there were no Samurai in WW2. The Samurai were disbanded during the Meiji period and swords were prohibited to be worn in public by the Haitōrei Edict in 1876 except for certain individuals such as former samurai lords (daimyōs), the military and police.

    Third, the majority of the swords carried by Japanese officers were not the traditional Katanas carried by the Samurai. They are known as Guntō or military sword.

    Guntō (軍刀, military sword) is the name used to describe Japanese swords produced for use by the Japanese army and navy after the end of the samurai era in 1868. In the following era (Meiji period 1868–1912) samurai armour, weapons and ideals were gradually replaced with Western-influenced uniforms, weapons and tactics. Japan developed a conscription military in 1872 and the samurai lost the status they held for hundreds of years as the protectors of Japan. The migration from hand making blades, to that of machined-assisted creations was steadily increasing. Early in the production of guntō swords craftsmanship and artistic additions continued, but fell in heavy decline following Japan-wide increases in mass production. And thus guntō swords became the standard in the new military, transitioning the swords worn by the samurai class to an advancing battlefield.

    There are 3 different versions of the Guntō:

    Kyū guntō (old military sword)

    The first standard sword of the Japanese military was known as the kyū guntō (旧軍刀, old military sword). Murata Tsuneyoshi (1838–1921), a Japanese general who previously made guns, started making what was probably the first mass-produced substitute for traditionally made samurai swords. These swords are referred to as Murata-tō and they were used in both the Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905).[7] The kyū guntō was used from 1875 until 1934, and many styles closely resembled European and American swords of the time, with a wraparound hand guard (also known as a D-guard) and chrome plated scabbard (saya), the steel scabbard is said to have been introduced around 1900.

    Prior to 1945, many kyū guntō were distributed to commissioned officers to fill a demand for swords to Japan's expanding military officer classes. To distinguish individuality, wealth or craftsmanship, many swords were produced in batches as small as 1–25 to maintain the legacy of sword culture. Styles varied greatly, with inspirations drawn from swords of early periods, familial crests, and experimental artistic forms that the Meiji Restoration period had begun to introduce. Some examples have included European style silverworking, jade, cloisonné, or metalwork and paint for artistic relief.

    After the Second World War's conclusion, most produced guntō were made to resemble the traditionally cloth wrapped shin-gunto swords, but out of a solid metal casting. On later models the hilts were made of aluminum and painted to resemble the lacing (ito) on officer's shin-guntō swords. These swords will have serial numbers on their blades and are nearly always machine made. If the sword is all original, the serial numbers on the blade, tsuba, saya and all other parts should match.

    Shin guntō (new military sword)

    The Shin guntō (新軍刀, new military sword) was a weapon and symbol of rank used by the Imperial Japanese Army between the years of 1935 and 1945. During most of that period, the swords were manufactured at the Toyokawa Naval Arsenal. In response to rising nationalism within the armed forces, a new style of sword was designed for the Japanese military in 1934. The shin guntō was styled after a traditional slung tachi of the Kamakura Period (1185-1332). Officers' ranks were symbolized by coloured tassels tied to a loop at the end of the hilt. The corresponding colors were brown-red and gold for generals; brown and red for field officers; brown and blue for company or warrant officers; brown for sergeants, sergeant majors or corporals. The blades found in shin guntō ranged from modern machine made blades through contemporary traditionally manufactured blade to ancestral blades dating back hundreds of years.

    Kaiguntō (naval sword)

    Kaiguntō (海軍刀, naval sword) are the less common naval versions of the shin guntō. Some kai gunto were produced with stainless steel blades.
    Dude,i remember some person on topix said that thing about samurai swords slicing rifles. so i'm sorry
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #15  
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    55,250
    I have a couple of sword canes. I always take
    one when I go for a walk. Just in case...
    May the FORCE be with you!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #16  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    53,775
    A bodygaurd is your best bet, Sam or I always carry a sword.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
    "If the Bible is true why don't we have any urns or vessels that like say expires 6/15/300 BC on the bottom?"
    Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #17  
    Senior Member Zathras's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    San Jose, California
    Posts
    8,146
    Quote Originally Posted by hai View Post
    Dude, I remember some person on topix said that thing about samurai swords slicing rifles. so I'm sorry.
    No need to be sorry Hai. You were just repeating what you thought was a fact. Nothing wrong with that. There was an episode of Mythbusters where they looked into this and found it to be false. There were propaganda films during WW2 that showed a swordsman cutting a gun barrel off but the barrel they used was made out of wood and not one that would have been used on a real weapon.
    Solve a man's problem with violence and help him for a day. Teach a man how to solve his problems with violence, help him for a lifetime - Belkar Bitterleaf

    Liberalism is what the stupid think is smart.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #18  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    20,729
    Quote Originally Posted by SarasotaRepub View Post
    I have a couple of sword canes. I always take
    one when I go for a walk. Just in case...
    I need one of those for walking around Detroit. Although my singing crazy songs in public defense has worked pretty well-start singing country western songs and people will cross the street to avoid coming near you. My favorite for this purpose are John Denver songs.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #19  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I came to Texas as soon as I could
    Posts
    18,211
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I need one of those for walking around Detroit. Although my singing crazy songs in public defense has worked pretty well-start singing country western songs and people will cross the street to avoid coming near you. My favorite for this purpose are John Denver songs.
    If you are relating John “mile high” Denver to country music then your understanding of country is about the same level as my understanding of hyper-physics.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    . If you ain't havin' fun, it's your own damn fault
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #20  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    20,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Retread View Post
    If you are relating John “mile high” Denver to country music then your understanding of country is about the same level as my understanding of hyper-physics.

    The people I am trying to scare off consider it to be country music.

    I was raised listening to "easy listening" music, because my mom loved it and my dad didn't hate it. So Denver, The Carpenters, Barbara Streisand, Barry Manilow, the soundtracks to SNF and Grease, this was the music I heard until I was old enough to develop my own taste. Also, we sang John Denver songs at Young Life meetings, so I know most of the words.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •