Thread: Potato ricer

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  1. #11  
    I'd agree with some of others in this thread that riced potatoes are a different dish from mashed potatoes. I never use my ricer for mashed potatoes. It's good for some other things like potato breads or pancakes and I use mine for lefse, of course.

    I had no idea they even made celebrity ricers. I got mine at a yard sale. :o
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'd agree with some of others in this thread that riced potatoes are a different dish from mashed potatoes. I never use my ricer for mashed potatoes. It's good for some other things like potato breads or pancakes and I use mine for lefse, of course.

    I had no idea they even made celebrity ricers. I got mine at a yard sale. :o
    A potato ricer is used to process food by forcing it through small holes, which are often not much larger than a grain of rice. Mashed potatoes are a food commonly made using this utensil. In technical terms, it works by a process of extrusion. A potato ricer can also be used to squeeze excess water from sliced or grated potatoes. This is useful to make crispy chips and hash browns.

    At least three types exist. The simplest variety is little more than a grid on a handle. Food is processed against a flat surface or inside a container. Slightly more elaborate models resemble a very large garlic press. A rotary type, called a food mill also exists where the food is driven toward the grid by a large screw, similar to a meat grinder but without the rotary blade.

    Potato ricers are used in the making of lefse (a Norwegian staple) and spätzle (German noodles), as well as for making homemade gnocchi (a type of Italian pasta).
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  3. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    A potato ricer is used to process food by forcing it through small holes, which are often not much larger than a grain of rice. Mashed potatoes are a food commonly made using this utensil. In technical terms, it works by a process of extrusion. A potato ricer can also be used to squeeze excess water from sliced or grated potatoes. This is useful to make crispy chips and hash browns.

    At least three types exist. The simplest variety is little more than a grid on a handle. Food is processed against a flat surface or inside a container. Slightly more elaborate models resemble a very large garlic press. A rotary type, called a food mill also exists where the food is driven toward the grid by a large screw, similar to a meat grinder but without the rotary blade.

    Potato ricers are used in the making of lefse (a Norwegian staple) and spätzle (German noodles), as well as for making homemade gnocchi (a type of Italian pasta).
    and by elitists to make mashed potatoes.
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'd agree with some of others in this thread that riced potatoes are a different dish from mashed potatoes. I never use my ricer for mashed potatoes. It's good for some other things like potato breads or pancakes and I use mine for lefse, of course.

    I had no idea they even made celebrity ricers. I got mine at a yard sale. :o
    in the next case of butt rash cream you send my way, could you throw in a few bags of lefse? I hate making it but love eating it :D
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  5. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    My sister was raving about the Martha Stuart potato ricer she got on sale at Macy's.
    Well, there's your problem. It was a cheap knockoff of the Martha Stewart brand. :)
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  6. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by lurkalot View Post
    in the next case of butt rash cream you send my way, could you throw in a few bags of lefse? I hate making it but love eating it :D
    I'll see what I can do. I've made a ton of it this month. ;)
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Well, there's your problem. It was a cheap knockoff of the Martha Stewart brand. :)
    No, it was the Martha Stewart brand---in her trademark little turquoise box, sold at Macy's. It just wasn't well made. Guess Martha is skimping on quality.
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