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  1. #1 The real story behind "Drag Queen Story Hour" and other LGBT activism in libraries 
    Power CUer
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    Jun 2008
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    I can only include snippets of the article here, but it is really worth the read. The American Library Association is working hand in glove with "gay rights" organizations to destroy the one place parents thought kids were safe. And our taxpayer dollars are being used for this.

    How libraries are being used to corrupt children and what you can do about it
    https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion...an-do-about-it

    ...The Lexington Park Library in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, first came under fire in March of 2017 when local homeschool mom, Georgia Kijesky, discovered that several libraries were planning to host a graphic sex-ed workshop for 12–17-year-old children. The workshop was co-sponsored by the libraries and the Southern Maryland Area Secular Humanists (SMASH). It was promoted as strictly kids-only and led by Bianca Palmisano, a Planned Parenthood-certified sex educator, author of Safer Sex for Trans Bodies, and founder of Intimate Health Consulting. As a result of Kijesky’s efforts to expose the workshop and pressure the county commissioning boards, the St. Mary’s County Library Board of Trustees cancelled the workshop at Lexington Park and issued a press release. However, SMASH later revived the effort, and the workshop was held without official library sponsorship...


    ...DQSHs and Drag 101 events have seen a sustained backlash of petitions and protests from Christian communities, resulting in cancellations in several states, including Ohio, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Kentucky. The events have sometimes served as doorways for sex offenders to gain access to children, made evident by recent reports in Texas and Ohio, where library board officials revealed there were no background checks in place to vet any of the performers.

    Some of these events are paid for by the libraries themselves, through funds provided by the American Library Association (which stem from taxpayer-funded federal grants). Libraries also use state and local taxpayer money to host and promote the events. In other instances, the events are privately funded, but most event sponsors take advantage of federal grants from the CDC for comprehensive sex education and HIV prevention. In these cases, community healthcare organizations and LBGTQ-advocacy groups use CDC grant money to bring the events into libraries. An example of this relationship was recently uncovered in Ohio, when Equitas Health used part of its HIV prevention grant from the CDC to support a Drag 101 event at the Licking County Library. The event was promoted as a “safe-sex for teens” workshop by the Newark Ohio Pride Coalition. It was cancelled after a large public outcry led to the Ohio House Speaker’s involvement in shutting it down....
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Once the ALA realized it was getting pushback, they got sneaky.

    Some other snippets:

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion...an-do-about-it

    The backbone of the LGBTQ community’s alliance with the American library system is firmly structured within the massive ALA organization, including, but not limited to, the:

    • Office of Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services
    • Freedom to Read Foundation
    • Office for Intellectual Freedom
    • Intellectual Freedom Committee
    • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Roundtable



    The roundtable provides tools and resources to promote acceptance of the LGBTQ lifestyle through the American library system and recommends reading lists for libraries with “significant gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or queer/questioning content, aimed at children and youth from birth to age 18.” These reading materials, when challenged by parents like Kijesky, are defended by the other parts of the system, under the banner of anti-censorship.

    To answer the backlash over DQSHs and Drag 101 events, the ALA created its #LibrariesRespond campaign to provide policy materials and resources to “defend pride at the local library.” The ALA also released an FAQ on responding to and preparing for controversial events and speakers.

    To help librarians promote acceptance of the LBGTQ lifestyle in resistant communities, the ALA published a blog post on how to be a “secret librarian advocate operative.” Suggestions included “sneakily fitting inclusive messages into current reading programs,” taking careful steps to bring Roundtable-approved materials into the library, and inviting local secular humanist, PFLAG, and GLADD chapters to host programs that distort God-designed sexuality and gender. This under-the-radar work is occurring right now in towns all across America. But in Kijesky’s situation in southern Maryland, the battle there has taken a sharp turn....
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