Eventually, Chad Albright just couldn't take it anymore. The rejection, the depression, the mounting bills, it became too much to deal with all on his own.

"I had to escape this debtors’ prison," he said. It felt like there was no other choice. "That's what America became to me, a prison. So I left."

Albright bought a one-way ticket to China and boarded an airplane, uncertain if he would ever return to the country he once considered home.

It was 2011, and Albright was 30 years old, starting over in a country more than 7,000 miles away from his life in Pennsylvania — away from his family, his friends, and far away from the $30,000 he owed in student loans.

Borrowing money for college seemed like a sound financial decision at the time. Albright thought his degree would reliably lead the way to a well-paying career.

With tuition comes high debt. And when delivering pizzas was the only job he could find two years post-graduation — with the country’s outstanding student debt rising above $1 trillion, and 1 million people defaulting on student loans every year — it didn’t seem like it was worth it after all.
Further down

But to his dismay, finding a job after graduation wouldn't be so easy. His degree in public relations wasn't opening up as many doors as he anticipated.
:asshole:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...na/1419169001/


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